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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

daftandbarmy

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We can tell people what is acceptable. We can tell them how to act and how to behave. We can't make them conform. No amount of training will prevent true deviants from behaving badly. We can only deal with the situation afterwards, unfortunately. The best we can hope for is a reduction in the number of incidents. This is the reality we have to accept. Sadly, someone will wind up getting hurt, despite our best efforts.

Dude, I'm in the room ;)
 

daftandbarmy

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For 'heart of the problem' read 'white males, I'm guessing:

Canadian Forces targeting ‘heart of the problem’ behind sexual misconduct: culture chief


One of the most senior women in the Canadian military says she believes the current push to address the crisis of sexual misconduct is unique from past efforts, which she says only targeted “symptoms.”
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In an interview with The West Block‘s Mercedes Stephenson, Lt.-Gen. Jennie Carignan said despite previous initiatives by the Canadian Forces, the root issue of culture was never fully addressed.

“This time we are going at the heart of the issue,” she said.

“We have been looking at symptoms historically. But what we have learned in the past six years is that we had not gotten to the heart of the problem … what is the environment that allows all range of misconduct to take place?”

“This is where we are going to be intervening.”

Carignan was named in April to the newly created post of chief of professional conduct and culture amid a national reckoning over allegations of high-level sexual misconduct.

In the months since Global News brought the first of multiple exclusive reports to light, the military has been embroiled in what leaders have acknowledged represents an existential “crisis” for the Canadian Armed Forces.


Lt.-Gen. Carignan ‘touched’ by Canada’s apology for military sexual misconduct

Monday, Gen. Wayne Eyre, chief of the defence staff, delivered a historic apology to survivors and victims of military sexual misconduct, alongside Defence Minister Anita Anand.

“You were let down. You were hurt. And when you tried to get help, we did not react,” said Eyre.

“I am sorry. We sincerely apologize for the trauma that you have experienced. To those who suffered in silence, we are sorry. To those who shouted until you could shout no more at great personal risk only to have no one listen to you, we are sorry.”

Anand described the problem as a “scourge” within the Canadian military — one that successive governments have repeatedly failed to adequately confront.

“Countless lives have been harmed because of inaction and systemic failure. This is a failure that our Canadian Armed Forces, our department, and the Government of Canada will always carry with us,” she said.

“These institutions failed you, and for that we are sorry. I am sorry.”


‘This time, we will not fail’: Ottawa apologizes to military sexual misconduct victims

Carignan last week said she has heard firsthand from large numbers of members who are “hungry for change” and when asked what was different from previous efforts, she pointed to leadership.

“At the very senior leadership, the chief of defence is very much engaged, the deputy minister is very much engaged,” said Carignan last week.

“What was not obvious to us collectively around the table is now being discussed and seen, which is a great difference. Five years ago, if I were to ask around the table, ‘What are we doing about culture?’ I would get silence,” she added.
“That’s not the case now.”

Former Supreme Court of Canada justice Louise Arbour is currently leading a review into how best to set up an independent reporting system for military sexual misconduct.

Her final report is due this spring.

 

Jarnhamar

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“This time we are going at the heart of the issue,” she said.

Sounds kinda familiar.

The initial focus of Operation HONOUR was on:
  • improving support for CAF members affected by sexual misconduct
  • rapidly modifying harmful behaviours, and
  • increasing understanding and vigilance at all levels of leadership
The strategy has four strategic lines of effort:
  • Awareness and understanding
  • Support for persons affected by sexual misconduct
  • Improve leadership response to incidents of sexual misconduct
  • Institutional leadership
Operation HONOUR recognizes that:
  • People are at the centre of everything we do. The way we support and treat them is directly related to our operational effectiveness.
  • Any attitudes or behaviours which undermine the camaraderie, cohesion and confidence of serving members threatens the CAF’s long-term success.
Operation HONOUR vision: A Canadian Armed Forces free of sexual misconduct where all are treated with dignity and respect.

Operation HONOUR mission: To ensure sexual misconduct is never minimized, ignored or excused so that the CAF cultivates the inclusive and respectful work environment that embodies the ethical principles and core values of the profession of arms.

Why didn't any of this address the heart of the issue? Guess we need to re-imagine our approach.

when asked what was different from previous efforts, she pointed to leadership.

“At the very senior leadership, the chief of defence is very much engaged, the deputy minister is very much engaged,” said Carignan last week

Oh.
 

Good2Golf

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“At the very senior leadership, the chief of defence is very much engaged, the deputy minister is very much engaged,” said Carignan last week

Did LGen Carignan mean that the DM is more engaged now, than she was for 2/3 of OP HONOUR’s conduct? It stuck me odd that during the Departmental apology, after the MND’s and CDS’ apologies, the DM started as an apology, then appeared to pivot to her personal concerns from her RCN past and skated past any direct involvement in helping to resolve the situation…an odd avoidance of personal (vice positional apologetic comments) culpability from the most powerful civil servant in the Defence portfolio…
 

Eye In The Sky

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Having been an end user of the grievance system, it is another dull knife in the CAFs tool drawer. I’ve said, start issuing RMs to decision makers who f$$ked up. COs, Commander
Of Commands, whatever. Another needed piece of the “culture change” being yammered about - holding all CAF members including Snr and General/Flag Officers accountable when they fuck over their subordinates and are negligent in their duties. Not just when it makes national news.
 

Halifax Tar

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Having been an end user of the grievance system, it is another dull knife in the CAFs tool drawer. I’ve said, start issuing RMs to decision makers who f$$ked up. COs, Commander
Of Commands, whatever. Another needed piece of the “culture change” being yammered about - holding all CAF members including Snr and General/Flag Officers accountable when they fuck over their subordinates and are negligent in their duties. Not just when it makes national news.

I am with you. But I would go further, if a leader fucks over a subordinate they needs to have a complete review of their competency and a probable release from the CAF. Officer or NCM.
 

OldSolduer

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I am with you. But I would go further, if a leader fucks over a subordinate that needs to have a complete review of the competency and a probable release from the CAF. Officer or NCM.
I reckon it depends on what you call "fucking over". Deliberately withholding entitlements? Can you expand on this?
 

trigger324

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daftandbarmy

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Not actioning/processing administrative functions in prescribed timelines.

Not providing a member(s) with their entitlements.

Failing to investigate a scenario.

Bullying, of various natures, was one issue I complained about to the next higher authority once.

Although they acknowledged my complaint, which was more of a collection of observations about how awful this particular senior leader was when dealing with people and that no one - anywhere - should be allowed to get away with the sh*t he was dealing out, nothing was done.
 
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