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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

rmc_wannabe

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Part of the problem is we need to shift away from the corporate "Credentials" based management model that was adopted in the early 2000s and adopt a more "Effects" based leadership model.

I say Effects based in the sense of "What are the effects of this person leading the organization? Are they positive? Toxic? Do people want to work with/for this person? Let's take a look at the health and morale of the group you command; discipline problems? Administrative Actions? Merely having having them aren't a reflection of your command ability, but they do speak to the environment you're fostering."

The ability to competently lead isn't vested in topping ALP, JCSP, or having a CCE Language profile or Masters of Defense Studies; they compliment it for sure, but the true metric of a leader's ability should always be reflected primarily in the personnel they're responsible for.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Certainly. I recognize the time lag- though in D&B’s case he’s talking about CO of a PRes unit, which is not nearly so selective a process as in the Regs; more a matter of who continues to show up. That, in turn, is a factor of who is supported in balancing their PRes service and outside life (there’s your ‘two places at once’), who is encouraged into opportunities and training, and who is made to feel welcome as part of the team, unit, and institution.
For a woman that wants a family, be in the PRes and have a career, it means being in 3 places at once. The big reality for a woman is that they must take about a year out of their career for each child at the minimum and more likely 2-3 per child. The good news is that it is far more acceptable for a father to take time off work to help raise a child. In fact the two things I am most thankfully and appreciative of my government job is that I could take time off of work with partial pay to help with the first year of each child. Plus the fact that I get 80% healthcare for my Type 1 kid. If we want to level the playing field more, it's not punishing men or women who take time off to raise their kids. That should be seen as a benefit to society, because a kid who has parents involved will likley cost society a lot less down the road.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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. If we want to level the playing field more, it's not punishing men or women who take time off to raise their kids.
But that can also mean 'punishing' those who didn't take time off. I remember a girl who as soon as she got full time had 3 children in 5 years. Now has the same seniority for job picks/ etc as those who worked all of those five years.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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The swerve about the future of RMC/degrees/ etc has been moved here.

Nice that this thread is quiet.
Bruce
 

daftandbarmy

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The swerve about the future of RMC/degrees/ etc has been moved here.

Nice that this thread is quiet.
Bruce

Yes, too quiet ;)

hey arnold nicksplat GIF
 

Ostrozac

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There seems to be a new trend for military defendants to wear 1A (DEU with medals) for their criminal trials. Presumably because the medals are more impressive than the ribbons. This seems to skirt the edges of misusing the uniform, 3 is approved for off-duty wear, while 1A is supposed to be reserved for ceremonial use. The standard for court martial, which is written in policy, remains 3 (DEU with ribbons).
 

Haggis

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Is a court martial in the definitions as any court proceedings?
Roughly put, DEU 3 is regarded as equivalent to business attire whereas DEU 1/1A is a tuxedo equivalent. DEU 3 would be suitable in any courtroom.

He wouldn't be the first GO/FO to play fast and loose with the dress regulations.
 
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rmc_wannabe

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Roughly put, DEU 3 is regarded as equivalent to business attire whereas DEU 1/1A is a tuxedo equivalent. DEU 3 would be suitable in any courtroom.

He wouldn't be the first GO/FO to play fast and loose with the dress regulations.
Especially since this isn't a Court Martial, its a civil trial. Pretty sure our various Dress Regs, DAODs, and CANFORGENs state its a big no no wearing any military uniform (1,1A, 3, 5s) to a civil trial.
 

Journeyman

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Especially since this isn't a Court Martial, its a civil trial. Pretty sure our various Dress Regs, DAODs, and CANFORGENs state its a big no no wearing any military uniform (1,1A, 3, 5s) to a civil trial.
New dress regs. #shrug ;)
 

Navy_Pete

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They all seem to be using file photos/footage, so would take it with a grain of salt unless it's actually from today.
 

Blackadder1916

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They all seem to be using file photos/footage, so would take it with a grain of salt unless it's actually from today.

From the linked article

"Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin arrived at the Gatineau courthouse Monday morning dressed in his military uniform wearing his medals with his wife, daughter and legal team by his side."
 

Infanteer

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Roughly put, DEU 3 is regarded as equivalent to business attire whereas DEU 1/1A is a tuxedo equivalent. DEU 3 would be suitable in any courtroom.

He wouldn't be the first GO/FO to play fast and loose with the dress regulations.

[pedantic]
DEU is not an order of dress, its a type of uniform.

Order of dress #3 (Service) is "business attire" equivalent.

And "tuxedo equivalent" would be #2 (Mess), not #1 (Ceremonial). Nobody would wear a tuxedo to a funeral (nor, to the original point, should it be worn to a civil proceeding either).
[/pedantic]
 

Good2Golf

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I suppose he, like VAdm(Re’d) Norman could have asked the CDS for permission?
 

btrudy

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Especially since this isn't a Court Martial, its a civil trial. Pretty sure our various Dress Regs, DAODs, and CANFORGENs state its a big no no wearing any military uniform (1,1A, 3, 5s) to a civil trial.

I'm not aware of any such provision in the dress regs. At least for a Reg Force member; if he was a reservist he'd need to have permission from his Chain of Command, as per Chapt 2 Section 1 para 26 of the dress instructions.

But there's very little in the way of prohibitions on Reg Force members wearing their uniform while off duty, beyond the generic "the deportment and appearance of all ranks, in uniform or when wearing civilian attire, shall on all occasions reflect credit on the CAF and the individual." At least to my recollection. Certainly not in the dress instructions themselves, which is where I'd expect such a prohibition to be located. Could you perhaps point us in the direction of the regulation you're thinking of?

As for the question of what order of dress would be appropriate for the occasion, wouldn't the relevant reference for that be Annex A Chapt 2? Which is, not surprisingly, completely vague on the subject. Court appearances aren't specified on any of the various orders of dress, but 1A does specify that it's for a "Formal and other significant occasions for which the wearing of complete ceremonial attire is not necessary or appropriate". Obviously, you're not bringing a sword to court, but it's quite clearly a formal and significant occasion, and thus I'd personally suggest it's the most appropriate uniform to wear to your civilian criminal trial if you're going to be wearing a uniform at all.
 

Blackadder1916

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(Medals only)No. 1AFormal and other significant occasions for which the wearing of complete ceremonial attire – No. 1 or 1B orders – is not deemed necessary or appropriate; ie., no swords, ceremonial belts, bayonets, etc.:
a. investitures;
b. levees;
c. ceremonial parades;
d. ceremonial occasions, when attending as a spectator;
e. on Remembrance Days in messes;
f. formal military weddings; and
g. other occasions as ordered.
(Duty)No. 3Daily duty and travel dress, suitable for all occasions, including:
a. divisions, routine parades and inspections;
b. public appearances;
c. off-duty wear;
d. appropriate military social occasions; and
e. other occasions as ordered.

And from the Court Martial Procedures Guide which, though it deals with military trials, would suggest the appropriate order of dress for civil proceedings.

Dress
3. Orders of dress for participating military members, listed at para 8, are as prescribed by the Chief Military Judge. For military participants, Service Dress Nº 3 (tunic with ribbons) will be worn unless otherwise specified by the military judge presiding at the court martial. Headdress is worn by participating military members until after the pleas have been entered but may be removed earlier at the discretion of the military judge. Headdress is also worn for the pronouncement of findings and sentence. At other times during the proceedings, headdress is not worn except for military witnesses who are called to testify.

But to throw a spanner in the works (as a good contrarian) let's not forget the former Chief Military Judge's wearing of civilian dress to the abortive attempt to court martial him.
 
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