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Survey on Future Remembrance Ceremonies

lenaitch

Sr. Member
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I wouldn't be particularly keen on the cadet organization getting tasked with it: was just casting around for the next-best-distributed single organization with a military bent. There's 145 JCR patrols and 1088 cadet corps/squadrons, though some of the latter are doubled or tripled up in a community (Sea/Army/Air), though the same thing might be said for Legion branches in some areas.

Agreed as far as existing memorials with religious symbols. I'm also game, on principle, to do the respectful silence thing; however, I'm not a fan of either a singular religious voice, especially if they're without military or RCL links, or every local officiant having a go at the cenotaph.

You can almost manage the latter if a community has a relatively sparse religious selection: around here, there's Sikhs, Buddhists, IIRC Hindus, a patchwork of First Nations, and a comprehensive sampling of Christians, with physical places of worship in the Cowichan Valley, and a few more without. Best to consign that to a separate event.

Actually, as a "displease almost everyone equally" choice, if there must be a religious element, let it be a CAF chaplain and/or someone from the local First Nation. Neither available? Strike prayer from the program.

Most of my Remembrance Day experience has been in small town Ontario which are generally pretty white-bread. In more recent years, they have often included an Aboriginal invocation (since there is no such thing as Aboriginal clergy, it is usually an elder or the chief). I think the community where I most recently attend, the 'religious part' is delivered by the Legion Chaplain, which is fair.

I also enjoyed the recently-late Rabbi Bulka at the National Memorial. As is often the case with Jewish clergy, it often struck me more a quick philosophical presentation than a sermon.

Like you, I have more issue with the parade of local nabobs who feel compelled to speak, and the parade of wreathes from some of the darndest organizations. Good for contributing but do it before or after. November weather here can be crappy and I recall being frozen or wet or both and looking at the vets and figuring if they can do it, so can I, but it's gotta be tough on them standing while somebody drones on or the local Remax agent places a wreath.
 

Weinie

Army.ca Veteran
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Most of my Remembrance Day experience has been in small town Ontario which are generally pretty white-bread. In more recent years, they have often included an Aboriginal invocation (since there is no such thing as Aboriginal clergy, it is usually an elder or the chief). I think the community where I most recently attend, the 'religious part' is delivered by the Legion Chaplain, which is fair.

I also enjoyed the recently-late Rabbi Bulka at the National Memorial. As is often the case with Jewish clergy, it often struck me more a quick philosophical presentation than a sermon.

Like you, I have more issue with the parade of local nabobs who feel compelled to speak, and the parade of wreathes from some of the darndest organizations. Good for contributing but do it before or after. November weather here can be crappy and I recall being frozen or wet or both and looking at the vets and figuring if they can do it, so can I, but it's gotta be tough on them standing while somebody drones on or the local Remax agent places a wreath.
I have tried to inculcate into my two oldest boys (14 and 9) the rationale and understanding why it is important to celebrate Nov 11th. For the last three years, it has been yadda,yadda,yadda at the microphone, followed by an interminable amount of wreath layings; to the point where my second oldest boy said " Who are all these people"? Neither of them expressed any interest in attending again. It really has no relevance to them.

The only thing that has captivated them has been the F-18 flypast, after the national ceremony in downtown Ottawa.
 
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