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The Eternal Debate- helmet scrim; fact or fiction

What are your views on using helmet scrim?


  • Total voters
    90

daftandbarmy

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Yes and no. For example:

Yes: when stalking, patrolling or conducting similar sneaky peeky stuff in daytime

No: Where night ops require you to wear night vis
 

Journeyman

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When securing a bridge in the middle of an urban centre:  No

bridgetoofar2-large.jpg





.....especially if it's "1944" and the Germans have Leopard 1s; scrim isn't going to help
 

medicineman

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OZ - forgot to add to the poll - "Gives something else for overly anal RSM's to worry about...especially lining up and interweaving the various colours" and also "It allows male soldiers the ability to play with their hairdos like their female counterparts"...I'm likely going to Hell for that last one, but in reality, it only just tipped me over anyway  ;D.

MM
 

x_para76

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IMO the only time scrim is relevant is in a defensive position... Other than that it is pointless.
 

Tibbson

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Journeyman said:
When securing a bridge in the middle of an urban centre:  No

bridgetoofar2-large.jpg





.....especially if it's "1944" and the Germans have Leopard 1s; scrim isn't going to help

If I recall that movie correctly one of the officers pointed that out around that time. 
 

GnyHwy

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When using an extreme bright green against a recently and freshly painted white door and under Hollywood lights, it is ineffective.

 

Tibbson

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GnyHwy said:
When using an extreme bright green against a recently and freshly painted white door and under Hollywood lights, it is ineffective.

Agreed.  The lad wearing the beret is much more effective.
 
M

MikeL

Guest
daftandbarmy said:
No: Where night ops require you to wear night vis

From my experience, scrim doesn't interfere/get in the way of the NVG or mount(I assume this is what you are referring too). Not having scrim immediately around the NVG mount, and ensuring no scrim is long enough to move in the way works for me.
 

jeffb

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I wonder if anyone has ever lost their helmet after putting it down with scrim on it. There's no way the CoC could deny THAT lost kit report...
 

ZacheryK

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Yes scrim because it breaks up the nice straight lines of your helmet. Also, just a thought here, there's something to be said about a section of cammed up, predator looking types attacking your position in terms of intimidation. 
 

x_para76

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IMO on the offensive scrim serves no purpose. It will be movement that alerts the enemy to your presence long before the shape of your helmet does. That and I'm sure the defenders won't think that they're being attacked by a company of wild bushes. If you're on a recce or any other type of sneaky peeky stuff you'll be wearing soft caps and likely won't be operating in anything bigger than a 4 man patrol so scrim does become more relevant.
 

Cloud Cover

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While on the subject, what's the deal with the over sized Israeli scrim? They look like they are all wearing some sort of sad culinary garb.
 

The Bread Guy

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whiskey601 said:
While on the subject, what's the deal with the over sized Israeli scrim? They look like they are all wearing some sort of sad culinary garb.
They sure do break up the helmet outline ....
beaufortstill.jpg
 

Nfld Sapper

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The Mitznefet is a covering for the infantry helmet used by the Israeli Defense Forces as of 1994. It is considerably larger than the helmet, giving the impression of a militarised chef's hat. The purpose of the floppy helmet cover is to break up the distinctive outline of a helmeted head and thus assist in the camouflage of the wearer. It was originally adapted in the 1990s for guerrilla warfare in the wood and bush land of south Lebanon, later adding a two sided camo, one for desert and one for woodland terrain. The Mitznefet is easily removable, and can be attached to the helmet while folded.
The term comes from the mitznefet, or turban, worn by the high priest in the Temple of Jerusalem, originating in a Hebrew language root meaning "to wrap".
 
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