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The FACTS: 2 more Canadian Soldiers KIA in Afghanistan 04/11/07

midget-boyd91

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Story just breaking onto CTVNN. Two more Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20070411/cdns_killed_070411/20070411?hub=TopStories
   
This has been a heartbreaking week, thoughts go out to families.
 

Nfld Sapper

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This is becoming a too common occurance again.

RIP Boys. Stand Easy, Mission Over.

Article Link

Two more Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan
Updated Wed. Apr. 11 2007 3:48 PM ET

CTV.ca News Staff

Two more Canadian soldiers have been reportedly killed in Afghanistan.

The news comes on the same day that the bodies of six Canadians killed in Afghanistan on Easter Sunday will be flown back to CFB Trenton in eastern Ontario.

"Details will have to wait until later on," Robert Fife, CTV's Ottawa bureau chief, told Newsnet on Wednesday.

The information will come out of either the Dept. of National Defence or from Canadian military officials in Kandahar, Afghanistan, he said.

"Everybody had been saying when the summer began in Afghanistan that it would be another bloody summer like it was last year," Fife said.

Earlier Wednesday, a suicide bombing attack on a Canadian convoy west of Kandahar City injured 10 Afghan civilians but no Canadian soldiers.

There was minor damage to a Canadian Forces tanker truck in that incident.

Repatriation ceremony

The bodies of the six soldiers are scheduled to arrive at 7:15 p.m. ET at the air base located about 160 kilometres east of Toronto.

Sgt. Don Lucas, Master Cpl. Chris Stannix, Cpls Aaron Williams and Brent Poland, and Ptes David Greenslade and Kevin Kennedy were killed when their light armoured vehicle ran over a roadside bomb 75 kilometres west of Kandahar City.

They were inside a LAV-III armoured vehicle at the time. Military officials say the bomb was probably both very powerful and a lucky strike, as LAVs have been doing a good job of keeping Canadian soldiers protected.

When the bodies arrive, Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor will be on the tarmac to meet them, along with their families and other dignitaries.

Fife said the event is closed to the media, although CTV and other outlets will cover it from outside the base.

He didn't know if Gov. Gen. Michaelle Jean, the formal commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces, will attend the repatriation ceremony or a memorial at CFB Gagetown, the New Brunswick home base for five of the six dead soldiers.
 

The Bread Guy

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A few more details, shared with the usual disclaimers....

- edited 112042EDT Apr to add Reuters report -

Two Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan
CEFCOM NR–07.007 - April 11, 2007
Article link

Two Canadian soldiers were killed and two others were injured, one seriously, when a roadside bomb exploded near their vehicle earlier today. The incident occurred shortly before 8 p.m. Kandahar time, approximately 38 km west of Kandahar City. These soldiers had been assisting another vehicle that had been struck by a roadside bomb earlier in the day, one soldier suffered only minor injuries in this earlier attack.  The three injured soldiers were immediately evacuated to the multinational medical facility at Kandahar Airfield for treatment and are assessed as stable.  The names of the casualties are being withheld pending next of kin notification.  Today is another sad day for the Canadian Forces and our thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of these fine soldiers. The incidents of the last few days, while challenging for Joint Task Force Afghanistan, have galvanized our determination to support and help the long-suffering people of Afghanistan.



2 Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan
CBC Online, 11 Apr 07, 19:24 PM ET
Article link

Two Canadian soldiers were killed and three were injured in two separate roadside bombings in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the military has confirmed.  The attacks happened within hours of each other, in locations less than one kilometre apart, said Col. Mike Cessford of the Canadian Armed Forces said.  The names of the injured and dead were not released immediately, as the soldiers' families had not yet been notified.  "As you can appreciate, our thoughts are with the families of the soldiers that we have lost," Cessford told reporters in Afghanistan. "All soldiers are thinking of these families."  He said the bombings occurred about 38 kilometres west of Kandahar on Wednesday night. The second bomb, which occurred next to a Canadian military vehicle, took the greatest toll — killing the two soldiers and injuring two.  The third injured soldier was hurt in the first bombing ....



Two Canadians dead, 3 injured in Afghanistan: military official
Canadian Press, 11 Apr 07
Article link

Two Canadians have been killed and three injured in Afghanistan in two separate attacks, a military official says in Kandahar.  Col. Mike Cessford, deputy commander of the Canadian contingent in Afghanistan, says the two roadside bomb explosions happened west of Kandahar city.  He says the injured soldiers are in stable condition.  He did not say where the soldiers are from, but during a service in New Brunswick, Lt.-Col. Paul Kearney says the unit involved is from Petawawa, Ont.  The news comes the same day bodies of six Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan last Sunday are to arrive in Trenton, Ont.  Earlier today, military officials reported 10 Afghan civilians were injured when a suicide car bomber targeted a Canadian military convoy west of Kandahar city.  But Canadian military spokesman Lt. John Nethercott said no soldiers were hurt.  The bomb damaged a Canadian Forces tanker truck.



Two Canadian soldiers killed in Afghan blast
Reuters (UK), 11 Apr 07, 20:20 EDT
Article link

Two Canadian soldiers were killed and two wounded in Afghanistan on Wednesday when a roadside bomb exploded near their vehicle, the Defense Ministry said.  The attack happened three days after six soldiers died when their armored vehicle ran over a massive explosive device in the war-torn country. Canada has lost 53 soldiers since troops were sent to Afghanistan in 2002 as part of the U.S.-led war on terrorism.  The Defense Ministry said the blast took place about 23 miles west of the southern city of Kandahar -- where Canada has a 2,500-strong mission -- as the soldiers were assisting another vehicle that had been damaged in an earlier bomb attack. One of the survivors had serious wounds.  "Today is another sad day for the Canadian forces and our thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of these fine soldiers," a ministry statement said.  "The incidents of these last few days, while challenging ... have galvanized our determination to support and help the long-suffering people of Afghanistan."  Opinion polls show Canadians are sharply divided over the wisdom of the mission, which is due to end in February 2009. Opposition politicians say Canada's troops spend too much time fighting Taliban militants and not enough on helping rebuild the country.

 
J

Jacqueline

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"The incidents of these last few days, while challenging ... have galvanized our determination to support and help the long-suffering people of Afghanistan."

Opinion polls show Canadians are sharply divided over the wisdom of the mission, which is due to end in February 2009.


They want to help the people of Afghanistan, but the polls show divided wisdom.
 

The Bread Guy

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Latest CF statement here....

Names of Canadian Soldiers Killed in Afghanistan Released

OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(CCNMatthews - April 11, 2007) - The names of the two Canadian soldiers killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan on April 11, 2007 are as follows:

Master Corporal Allan Stewart, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, based in Petawawa, Ont.; and
Trooper Patrick James Pentland, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, based in Petawawa, Ont.


These two soldiers were killed and two others were injured, one seriously, when a roadside bomb exploded near their vehicle earlier today. The incident occurred shortly before 8 p.m. Kandahar time, approximately 38 km west of Kandahar City. The soldiers had been assisting another vehicle that had been struck by a roadside bomb earlier in the day, one soldier suffered only minor injuries in this earlier attack.

 

George Wallace

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http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=b212d173-b824-46b4-a2ff-70f671359ee3&k=90823

Reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions (§29) of the Copyright Act from today’s Ottawa Citizen:


Attacks on Canadian convoys kill two soldiers
Three also injured in Afghanistan


Jonathan Fowlie
CanWest News Service

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Two Canadian soldiers died in Afghanistan Wednesday and three others were injured in a day that saw three separate attacks on convoys of Canadian armoured vehicles.

The deaths, which come less than a day after a ramp ceremony for six other fallen soldiers, bring the number of Canadians killed on the battlefield since Sunday to eight, the most ever in a given week in Afghanistan since Canada’s mission in there began in 2002. It pushes the total number of Canadian soldiers killed here to 53.

"As you can appreciate our thoughts, again, are with the families of the soldiers we have lost," Col. Mike Cessford, deputy commander of Task Force Afghanistan said from the NATO base in Kandahar early Thursday.

"It is hard to put into words what they must be feeling at this time of sorrow," he added.

Master Cpl. Allan Stewart, 30, and Trooper Patrick James Pentland, 23, died after their vehicle hit a roadside bomb in an area about 38 kilometres west of Kandahar City, and in a region that Canadians claimed last June to have mostly rid of Taliban influence.

Military officials confirmed the dead soldiers were members of the Royal Canadian Dragoons, based in Petawawa, Ont.

CFB Petawawa was sombre Wednesday night as news of the deaths of the two soldiers began to spread through town. Many troops serving with the Dragoons and on the base won’t learn the news until this morning, said Lieut. Krzysztof Stachura, a public affairs official at CFB Petawawa.

“It is tough,” he said. “I don’t think it’s any easier than when the base heard two days ago that six had died. It doesn’t matter where they come from.”

Late Wednesday night, Stewart’s family said the fallen soldier was born for the military, but lived for his family.

“He was more then military. He about family. Even though he was quiet and kept to himself, we knew he was there for us,” said his sister, Saskatoon resident Tanya Safard.

“He said this was last tour. He wanted to be home with his daughters.

A career-military man, Stewart lived in Trout Brook, N.B. with his wife and two daughters, Sarah, 8, and Brittney, 12.

In Afghanistan, Blackhawk helicopters brought the two bodies back to Kandahar Airfield soon after the blast along with the wounded. One of those injured soldiers was carried into the base hospital on a stretcher, while another — still noticeably dazed — staggered in with the help of two medics.

Of those wounded soldiers, one sustained minor injuries while a second, who was seriously hurt, will soon be taken to the U.S. Military Hospital in Landstuhl, Germany.

A third, who was injured in a separate attack, was also brought in with minor injuries. All three were listed in stable condition.

Wednesday’s deaths were the fourth and fifth casualties suffered by the Royal Canadian Dragoons and the 19th and 20th for CFB Petawawa in total. There are about 100 Dragoons and 500 soldiers in total deployed to Afghanistan from the base.

Cessford said the fatal blast took place around 8 p.m. and that it happened about 800 metres from an earlier, similar, attack against another convoy of Canadians.

That earlier incident, which Cessford called "unrelated,” took place around 6 p.m., he said, explaining that a separate Canadian armoured vehicle convoy hit another roadside bomb. The shrapnel from that explosion left one soldier in a trailing vehicle — the third to be brought to the hospital — with minor injuries.

In a brief news conference, Cessford refuted claims this week’s series of attacks should be seen as the beginning of a Taliban spring offensive.

"I think the spring offensive, if you listen to what the Taliban are saying, they are talking in hundreds, and multiples of attacks. These are two separate incidents widely dispersed," he said.

"It is a spike in casualties, obviously, we will examine it closely but again I am not convinced that we are seeing a Taliban spring offensive."

Cessford went on to suggest that instead of a show of new force, these attacks may in fact be a sign of weakness.

"The Taliban have tried to fight us in a conventional fight. They have lost," he said. "They have limited capability now and that is now turning to attacks with IED’s suicide bombs and so on — in my mind, perhaps, acts of desperation.”

The two blasts followed yet another attack on Canadian soldiers Wednesday, one that happened at about 1:30 p.m. In that third attack, a suicide bomber driving a taxi set off a large explosion next to a convoy of Canadian vehicles.

The blast blew out the front window of a nearby water truck and sent pieces of the taxi flying close to nine metres, witnesses said.

No soldiers were injured in that attack, which happened in a western district of Kandahar City, though Kandahar’s health director said 10 Afghan civilians were injured.

On Wednesday afternoon, military spokesman navy Lieut. John Nethercott said the explosion caused minor damage to a Canadian LAV III, but added all the vehicles in the convoy were able to keep driving and to leave the scene.

Taj Muhammed, a 25-year-old day labourer was one of those who was injured.

He said he was on his way to Helmand province to harvest poppies when the explosion went off. He explained he’d pulled his car to the side of the road at the time because a Canadian convoy was about to pass.

"Suddenly I heard an explosion," he said from his hospital bed,where he was being treated for burns.

"After the explosion fire spread all around us," he added. "I lost consciousness and when I opened my eyes I found myself at the Mirwais Hospital."

The string of attacks took place less than three days after yet another IED strike where six Canadian soldiers died in a blast about 75 kilometres west of Kandahar City.

Cpl. Brent Poland, Sgt. Donald Lucas, Cpl. Aaron E. Williams, Pte. Kevin Vincent Kennedy, Pte. David Robert Greenslade, and Cpl. Christopher Paul Stannix all died in that blast, and were given a final farewell at a ramp ceremony on the Kandahar Airfield Tuesday night.

On Wednesday morning, several infantrymen of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment’s hotel company spoke about what happened during the blast on Sunday and of how they have been coping since.

Master Cpl. Brian McCallum, 31, was the crew commander in the stricken vehicle and recalled on Wednesday what he felt immediately after the explosion went off: "From what I recall, I just remember a sense of floating," he said, adding he was standing halfway into the vehicle’s turret at the time the LAV hit the IED.

"When things did settle down I was on top of the turret," he said. "I think my legs were still inside the turret but the rest of me was out of the vehicle."

McCallum said he can’t recall feeling any specific emotions at the time, and that instead he simply fell back on his training and snapped into action.

"I remember calling out for names, waiting for word back," he said, explaining he was greeted by silence.

"At first I wasn’t getting any response," he said."A good sign was when the gunners hatch opened and my gunner was telling me `I’m all right, I’m all right.’”

McCallum and others said they have spent much of the last few days leaning on each other and to sharing funny anecdotes and quiet moments. Most of all,however, he said they’ve started putting their minds towards returning to the field.

"We come here to do a job and I would like to finish it with the guys I came with," he said.

Pte. Dennis MacKenzie, 23, agreed saying he remains comfortable with the risks that come with the job, as well as with the training and equipment Canadian soldiers have to protect themselves.

"As far as I’m concerned it happens," he said of death on the battlefield. "You come in thinking the worst, knowing the worst can happen and knowing the risks of coming here.

"You can’t come here thinking the best. You’re going to try there best to do what you can do, but it’s always going to be in the back of your mind," he added.

When asked if he will be lonely when he heads back into the field without his old crew, McCallum took a long pause and then settled on an answer.

"No, I don’t think so," he said."I’ve got a little bit of everybody in me and I know they’ll be riding along with us because they wouldn’t have given up," he added as he started choking up.
"They are all there until the bitter end."

With files from Ottawa Citizen and Saskatoon StarPhoenix
© CanWest News Service 2007
 

GAP

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Dead Canadian soldier called mother day earlier to say all was well: father
at 22:51 on April 11, 2007, EST.
Article Link

HALIFAX (CP) - The father of one of the Canadians killed in Afghanistan on Wednesday recalled his son as a dutiful young man who wanted to follow in his footsteps as a soldier.

"He was just a quiet, fit soldier who died doing what he wanted to do," said Jim Pentland, 45, a retired soldier, of his son, Patrick James Pentland, 23, who was one of two soldiers killed after a roadside bomb detonated near an armoured vehicle in Afghanistan.

Patrick, based in Petawawa, Ont., had telephoned his mother on Tuesday, as he always did after bad news came from Afghanistan, to reassure her.

"He had just got in touch with his mother yesterday to let her know he was safe after the other soldiers were killed there," said the father in a brief interview with The Canadian Press.

"So any time something happened, he tried to get word home to let her know he was OK. He was very considerate towards his Mom for that."

In one small blessing amid the tragedy, the father noted that Patrick had seen his mother Gabriele, 43, and his German grandparents during a recent leave in Germany.

Sadly, his father had chosen to stay home and look after the dogs and cats at their home in New Brunswick.

Being in Gagetown, among other military families, will help his family cope, said Pentland.

"The community we're in, it's basically a military community. A lot of our friends are military or retired military. They've watched our son grow up, it's a tight-knit community and for coping that will make it a little bit easier for us."

Pentland said his son's passions were outdoor camping and martial arts.

But above all, he loved being a soldier.

"He always wanted to be a soldier, that was what he wanted to do," he said.

"He was a fit athlete. Other than that, he was a quiet, patient person."

Patrick Pentland was born on the Canadian military base in Lahr, Germany, and returned with the family to Gagetown, N.B. when he was young. The family returned for a second stint in Germany, before returning again to the base in Gagetown.

His father said the family doesn't question the conflict in Afghanistan despite his son's death.

"They're soldiers. They go over there to do a job, to try to make life better for other people," he said.

"We hold no animosity towards the people over there. They have enough animosity in their lives already. We look at it as Canadians trying to help another country that isn't as fortunate as our own."

He said it shouldn't surprise Canadians that so many Maritimers are among the recent dead in Afghanistan.

Pentland said many of the young men from New Brunswick join the military to see a wider world, "and to find adventure."

That's what he did himself as a young man, said the father.

"He followed in the same path I went."
More on link
 

GAP

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I did not know what a Coyote recon vehicle looked like....so for those in my shoes, here are some pics

edited: had to remove two pics....I screwed up
 

Teddy Ruxpin

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Not quite, GAP, the top two vehicles are Cougars - the 76mm variant of the AVGP, now out of service.  The bottom picture is of a Coyote.
 

Recce41

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Well Fellas
Im heading back on the 18th . Its going to be hard for the Sqn.
RIP Stu and Pat. Bold and Swift.  :salute:
 

Nfld Sapper

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MND Statement


Statement
Statement by the Minister of National Defence on the deaths of Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland
NR-07.021 - April 12, 2007

OTTAWA – The Honourable Gordon O’Connor, Minister of National Defence, issued the following statement today on the deaths of Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland:

“The Canadian Forces grieve for Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland, who died yesterday in Afghanistan. The incident occurred when a roadside bomb exploded near their vehicle, as they were helping another vehicle that had been struck by a bomb earlier in the day.

My thoughts and prayers go out to the families and loved ones of these devoted soldiers. These tragedies are a painful reminder that the Canadian Forces are engaged in a difficult and dangerous mission in Afghanistan.

But in the face of this, Canada’s soldiers are succeeding in our mission of securing a brighter future for the Afghan people while ensuring that Afghanistan never again becomes a base for terrorism. Canada stands shoulder to shoulder with our troops and our allies, unwavering in our commitment to the success of this mission.

We will honour the sacrifice of these brave soldiers by continuing our efforts to build a safe and secure Afghanistan.”

-30-



 

Nfld Sapper

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GG Statement

Message from Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada, on the death of Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland in Afghanistan
April 12, 2007

“This has been a difficult week for Canada. My husband, Jean-Daniel Lafond, and I would like to extend our condolences to the families and friends of Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland. Our hearts also go out to the soldiers who were injured during this incident; we know how worried their loved ones must be.

Last month in Afghanistan, I saw for myself how committed the women and men of the Canadian Forces are in their efforts to restore security and stability to the Afghan people. 

We recognize the difficulty and the dangers of this mission and we must salute and honour the extraordinary courage with which our soldiers carry out their duties. Our thoughts are with them.”

Michaëlle Jean

- 30 -


PM Statment


Statement by Prime Minister Stephen Harper on the deaths of Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland
12 April 2007
Ottawa, Ontario


Prime Minister Stephen Harper issued the following statement on the deaths of Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland:

“It is with great sadness that I learned of the deaths of Master Corporal Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick James Pentland, who died yesterday in Afghanistan when a roadside bomb exploded near their vehicle as they assisted fellow soldiers. 

On behalf of the Government of Canada and all Canadians, I would like to express my sincerest condolences to their family and friends. In this time of mourning, our thoughts and prayers are with them.  They can take great pride in knowing that these brave soldiers helped build a better future for the Afghan people.  I also extend my wishes for a speedy recovery to those injured in this attack.

Their sacrifice leaves a profound legacy – a legacy of hope and confidence for the future of Afghanistan and its people.  They will not be forgotten.”


 

MOOXE

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CTV News stated that his wife posted a message on Tpr Patrick James Pentland's video game website about his death. I didnt see the url around here anywhere, has anyone got it?
 

Sig_Des

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MOOXE said:
CTV News stated that his wife posted a message on Tpr Patrick James Pentland's video game website about his death. I didnt see the url around here anywhere, has anyone got it?

Pat was not married.
 

George Wallace

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MOOXE said:
CTV News stated that his wife posted a message on Tpr Patrick James Pentland's video game website about his death. I didnt see the url around here anywhere, has anyone got it?

You got the wrong name.  It was MCpl Allan Stewart.
 

Blackhorse7

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:salute: :cdn:

Soldier on boys.  Toughest week we have had yet, and my prayers go out to the families of the departed, and the departed themselves.  I heard that Sears is in cooperation with Canex to sell support the troops gear.  No such luck here, so I ordered directly from Canex themselves.

Stay the course, Steven Harper.  We are doing the right thing over there, no matter how much it hurts.
 

Recce41

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MOOXE said:
CTV News stated that his wife posted a message on Tpr Patrick James Pentland's video game website about his death. I didnt see the url around here anywhere, has anyone got it?

No Pentlands but Stewarts. Pentland was single.
 

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Canadian soldier's salute from stretcher an iconic image of Afghan conflict
http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/War_Terror/2007/04/13/4004065-cp.html

By JAMES MCCARTEN
   
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (CP) - Hundreds of rigid salutes signalled the start of the long, sad journey home Friday for Master Cpl. Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick Pentland, but one served as a particularly poignant reminder of both the bond shared by soldiers and the perils of war: the one that came from a hospital stretcher.

An anonymous soldier, his eye blackened and an oxygen mask over his face, braved the diesel and dust of Kandahar Airfield to bid a final farewell to the two men with whom he was sharing a cramped Coyote armoured vehicle when it was flipped over Wednesday by a roadside bomb.
As pallbearers slowly carried the two flag-draped coffins toward a waiting military aircraft, the bedridden man from Conception Bay, N.L.., pressed his right hand to his temple, his index finger equipped with a pulse oximeter, an IV tube running the length of his bandaged right arm.

It was a vivid and inspiring counterpoint to the grim image of caskets wrapped in Canadian colours - a sight that has grown all too familiar for soldiers who are enduring Canada's worst week at war in half a century.
"The individual who you saw (on the stretcher) was also part of that crew," said Maj. Steve Graham, commanding officer of the reconnaissance squadron to which the two dead soldiers belonged.
It is Canadian Forces policy not to disclose the identities of injured soldiers. But the effect this injured soldier had on morale was unmistakable, Graham said. 
 
"The fact that he was on the tarmac, where all of my squadron could go and see him and see how he's doing - it had a big effect."
International Co-operation Minister Josee Verner, who stood directly across from the stretcher, dabbed at her eyes underneath dark sunglasses as 20 pallbearers carried the two coffins aboard a Hercules C-130, the skirl of bagpipes piercing the early-morning quiet.

"Despite the risk, despite what was happening to them every time they went out the gate, there was no hesitation, there was no question in their minds what they had to do; they got in their vehicle and they went and they did it," Graham said of Stewart and Pentland.
"You know what? Unfortunately, in this case, the Taliban got lucky. That's all it was; it was luck."
Both were from New Brunswick and based with the Royal Canadian Dragoons in Petawawa, Ont.

It was the second ramp ceremony at Kandahar Airfield in four days; the first, on Tuesday, followed the deaths of six other soldiers who were killed last Sunday when their light armoured vehicle, or LAV, was destroyed by an IED - an improvised explosive device.
Canadian troops have suffered similar or bigger losses in several plane crashes over the years, including the death of nine peacekeepers in 1974 when their plane was shot down en route to the Golan Heights.
But not since the Korean War, which ended in 1953, have Canadian troops in a combat role suffered losses on such a scale and in such a short period.

Stewart and Pentland died in the second of two roadside bombings Wednesday that took place just two hours and less than a kilometre apart, about 38 kilometres west of Kandahar.
"One group was going out, and unfortunately they struck a small IED that disabled one of their vehicles," battle group commander Lt.-Col. Rob Walker said Friday as he provided fresh details about the attack.
"Three vehicles that were already out deployed in the observation post to assist those individuals, and that's when, unfortunately, they hit another one."

Three soldiers were injured in Wednesday's blasts. The death toll now stands at 53 Canadian soldiers killed since the mission in Afghanistan began in 2002. A Canadian diplomat was also killed in the country.

 
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