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Top Gun 2

lenaitch

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Finally, the psychoanalysis is in and stating the obvious about the Navy ;)


Comparative Media Studies 201: “Heterosexual Undertones in Top Gun”​


Since its release in 1986, Top Gun has been universally accepted as the homoerotic story of a pilot whose “inverted” flying style puts him at odds with the straight-shooting patriarchal value system of the US Navy1. Yet while the past three decades of film criticism have reaffirmed this interpretation, recent study suggests that subtle layers of heterosexuality pervade the text. As unlikely as it seems, a closer reading reveals a romance between a cocky male pilot and his female instructor.

Indeed, this theory is inherently outlandish and absurd. How could a film featuring beach volleyball games, gratuitous locker room scenes, phallic fighter jets, and language such as “You can be my wingman anytime,” “Hard deck, my ass. We nailed that son of a bitch,” and “Buzzing the tower” be anything but a gay fantasia on naval aviation themes?

This paper, however, should not be written off as a stretch, or a Room 237 conspiracy theory, or “a contrarian opinion written solely for the sake of academic provocation” (which this author was previously accused of for writing “The Lion King’s Critique of Neo-Colonial Patrilineal Succession”). No. In this case, the critical community did not look closely enough at Top Gun, taking the text at face value and not recognizing it as an intellectual target-rich environment.

Whether it is a glance, a throwaway line (“You always go home with the hot women”), or the scenes where Maverick has sex with a woman, there are subtle instances of straightness that are impossible to deny. It is unclear if director Tony Scott intended this reading, but too many clues exist for it to be purely coincidental. These details appropriately fly under the viewer’s radar, much as Maverick did to the MiG in the film’s opening dogfight.
The first hint comes in the famous beach volleyball game, set to the sound of Kenneth Loggins’ “Playing With the Boys.” The scene, highlighting a shirtless and sweaty Tom Cruise and Val Kilmer (and a clothed Anthony Edwards), plays like a hyper-masculine exercise in reaffirming Susan Sontag’s definition of camp2. Yet in a wink to the audience, Maverick occasionally and subtly checks his watch during the game. This indicates that he is late, pointing us back to the overlooked plot point of his planned mid-day rendezvous with Charlie (portrayed by Kelly McGillis).

Or . . . sometimes a movie is just a movie.

Our daughter (CAF employee) saw it yesterday at a dedicated first screening for CAF personnel in her town and was suitably impressed. The first movie really did set the benchmark for aerial action photography and had to live up to the standard they set - and apparently they did.

I didn't realize Val Kilmer has had serious health issues.
 

armrdsoul77

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I saw Dune in Dolby Atmos and it blew my mind. I'm thinking this movie would also utilize the enhanced sound system.il_fullxfull.2944101740_kh0z.jpg
 

Remius

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Crimes committed by Maverick in the first Top Gun.





Before anyone freaks out, it’s all in good fun.
 

Blackadder1916

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Finally, the psychoanalysis is in and stating the obvious about the Navy ;)


Comparative Media Studies 201: “Heterosexual Undertones in Top Gun”​


Since its release in 1986, Top Gun has been universally accepted as the homoerotic story of a pilot whose “inverted” flying style puts him at odds with the straight-shooting patriarchal value system of the US Navy1. Yet while the past three decades of film criticism have reaffirmed this interpretation, recent study suggests that subtle layers of heterosexuality pervade the text. As unlikely as it seems, a closer reading reveals a romance between a cocky male pilot and his female instructor.

Indeed, this theory is inherently outlandish and absurd. How could a film featuring beach volleyball games, gratuitous locker room scenes, phallic fighter jets, and language such as “You can be my wingman anytime,” “Hard deck, my ass. We nailed that son of a bitch,” and “Buzzing the tower” be anything but a gay fantasia on naval aviation themes?

This paper, however, should not be written off as a stretch, or a Room 237 conspiracy theory, or “a contrarian opinion written solely for the sake of academic provocation” (which this author was previously accused of for writing “The Lion King’s Critique of Neo-Colonial Patrilineal Succession”). No. In this case, the critical community did not look closely enough at Top Gun, taking the text at face value and not recognizing it as an intellectual target-rich environment.

Whether it is a glance, a throwaway line (“You always go home with the hot women”), or the scenes where Maverick has sex with a woman, there are subtle instances of straightness that are impossible to deny. It is unclear if director Tony Scott intended this reading, but too many clues exist for it to be purely coincidental. These details appropriately fly under the viewer’s radar, much as Maverick did to the MiG in the film’s opening dogfight.
The first hint comes in the famous beach volleyball game, set to the sound of Kenneth Loggins’ “Playing With the Boys.” The scene, highlighting a shirtless and sweaty Tom Cruise and Val Kilmer (and a clothed Anthony Edwards), plays like a hyper-masculine exercise in reaffirming Susan Sontag’s definition of camp2. Yet in a wink to the audience, Maverick occasionally and subtly checks his watch during the game. This indicates that he is late, pointing us back to the overlooked plot point of his planned mid-day rendezvous with Charlie (portrayed by Kelly McGillis).


I have mixed emotions about Top Gun (original flavour). Yes, it was a good film and provided some easy jokes about fighter pilots but it could have an influence on behaviour. Shortly after its release, I was at Staff School and in my syndicate were three fighter pilots and though they were enthusiastic about the movie none of the three resembled Maverick or Iceman in any way. For those who may remember Staff School from back in the day, one of its nicknames was "Volleyball U", as the organized sport (syndicate v. syndicate competition) was volleyball. Our syndicate was okay, but we certainly didn't reach the top of the leader board and nobody wanted our pilots to play shirtless - especially the one who tried to make the case that the best physique for a jet jockey was endomorphic as he claimed they could handle Gs better - something to do with a higher fat to blood ratio meant his g-suit could squeeze more to his brain in tight turns.

Top Gun's influence also contributed to us (most of our syndicate) being called on the carpet the day after the mess dinner. Our syndicate hosted the school's librarian at the dinner and we succumbed to the temptation of serenading her with a rendition of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'". The powers that be thought it inappropriate and so there were some chosen warnings before we signed our course reports the following day (granted there were a few other hijinks during the course that may have gained us a certain reputation).
 

lenaitch

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So the lesson is entertainment doesn't necessarily reflect real life . . . so real life shouldn't try to reflect entertainment?
 

SupersonicMax

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I watched it this morning. I was good entertainment, more realistic than the first one. The cockpit voice alerts were accurate and the flying scenes were real.

Their SEAD and Escort plans were severely deficient during their little operation, and Maverick’s disregard for a planned, deliberate build up approach during testing of the new aircraft was wreckless (and would get you fired well before that happened!), but as I said, good entertainment! My kids loved it!
 
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Underway

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Just got back from the movie. The whole family really enjoyed it! My wife is even watching some military history show right now on naval aviation (and I'm not even in the room!).
I particularly liked that they added a bit more humor into it than the first movie. A couple of times I actually laughed out loud.

They say that they don't make movies like they used to, but this one certainly feels like the first one. They even brought back a lot of the original soundtrack.
 

Good2Golf

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Their SEAD and Escort plans were severely deficient during their little operation, and Maverick’s disregard for a planned, deliberate build up approach during testing of the new aircraft was wreckless (and would get you fired well before that happened!), but as I said, good entertainment! My kids loved it!
It’s like Maverick’s ego was writing cheques his body couldn’t cash…
 

The Bread Guy

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I have mixed emotions about Top Gun (original flavour). Yes, it was a good film and provided some easy jokes about fighter pilots but it could have an influence on behaviour ... Top Gun's influence also contributed to us (most of our syndicate) being called on the carpet the day after the mess dinner. Our syndicate hosted the school's librarian at the dinner and we succumbed to the temptation of serenading her with a rendition of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" ...
But that was the movie's fault, right? :) #VictimOfOurEnvironmentDefence
Sounds a lot like Petawawa following the release of "First Blood".
Lotta one-liners for instructors came out of this one, too ....
 
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