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US Reserves for Dual Citizens?

Mike5

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Hi,

Does anybody know what the options are for a dual citizen (Canada / US) to serve as an officer in the US military reserve?
 

Blackadder1916

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Some extracts from FAQs found on a US Army site.

http://www.7csc.army.mil/Transformation.aspx
I am interested in becoming an officer. What are my options?

The unit structure of the 7th CSC after transformation contains many additional officer slots. To assist with filling this shortfall, the command is utilizing two programs: direct commission and officer candidate school. In order to be eligible for commission, an enlisted Soldier must meet a list of requirements to include: Education (60 Semester Hours + ACT (19) or SAT (850), or a Bachelors degree); Age (screen for 40 and below); Security clearance (Interim Secret); GT score (110+); Must be a U.S. Citizen (no dual citizenship).

I hold dual citizenship and am interested in becoming an officer. Where do I begin the process?

Becoming an officer in the U.S. military requires a security clearance. Individuals that maintain dual-citizenship are not allowed to obtain a security clearance and are therefore not eligible to become officers.

From knowledge of an individual who did as you are contemplating, you would have to renounce the non-US citizenship and provide proof that you did so.
 

Ex-SHAD

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You still have the option of taking an Enlisted MOS (non-security clearance). That being said, good luck if you chose to serve, and just remember to actually study for your ASVAB and be physically and mentally ready for MEPS (and don’t lie to your service liaison/the doc, since they will find out pretty quickly).

If you still wish to pursue a career as a member of the ARNG, then you can apply to renounce your citizenship (http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/citizenship/renounce-how.asp).
 

tomahawk6

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Why not just join the CF ? If you go the US route at some point you will have to choose.
 

Ex-SHAD

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That’s not entirely true.

A US or dual national does not have to renounce their citizenship at any point while in service to the United States Armed Forces, though they cannot hold a security clearance so long as they are a dual national.
Though the Oath of Allegiance clearly states:

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.”

This is simply a historical holdover, and due to current legislation you no longer lose your foreign nationality unless you chose to renounce it. Though, potentially Mike5 could be subject to losing his US Nationality if he chooses to serve a foreign power (The Canadian Armed Forces), now obviously this has not happened since WW2(and those veterans were all re-naturalized as US Citizens following entry into WW2), but these are all things to consider.
 

tomahawk6

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Army jobs that do not require a security clearance. If you become an officer you will be required to give up your dual citizenship. Alot of material is classified NOFORN" (No Foreign Dissemination) and dual citizenship might well mean that you are not allowed access to it. Another thing to consider is that as a dual citizen you are subject to the law of your birth country in addition to US law. I dont feel that the tradeoffs are worth keeping your non-US citizenship.

OOB--Diver

02--Band Member

02S--Special Band Member

11B--Infantryman

11C--Indirect Fire Infantryman

11H--Heavy Anti--armor Weapons Infantryman

11M--Fighting Vehicle Infantryman

12B--Combat Engineer

12C--Bridge Crewmember

13B--Cannon Crewmember

19D--Cavalry Scout

19E-M48--M60 Armor Crewman

19K-MI Armor Crewman

25M-Multlmedia Illustrator

25R--Visual Infonmation Equipment Operator

25VCombat Documentation/Production Specialist

35D--Air Traffic Control Equipment Repairer

35H--Test, Measurement, and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE) Maintenance Support Specialist

35L--Avionlc Communications Equipment Repairer

35Q--Avlonlc Flight Systems Repairer

42E--Optical Laboratory Specialist

43M-Fabric Repair Specialist

44B--Metal Worker

44E--Machinist

45B--SmaII Arms/Artillery Repairer

45D--Self-propelled Field Artillery Turret Mechanic

45E--MI ABRAMS Tank Turret Mechanic

45N--M6OAIIA3 Tank Turret Mechanic

45T--Bradley Fighting Vehicle System Turret Mechanic

46Q--Journalist

46R--Broadcast Journalist

51B--Carpentry and Masonry Specialist

51K--Plumber

51M--Firefighter

51R--lnterior Electrician

51T--Technical Engineering Specialist

52C--Utilities Equipmnt Repairer

52D--Power-Generation Equipment Repairer

52F--Turblne Engine Driven Generator Repairer

52G--Transmission and Distribution Specialist

54B--Chemical Operations Specialist

57E--Laundry and shower Specialist

62B--Constructlon Equipment Repairer

62E--Heavy Construction Equipment Operator

62F--Crane Operator

62G--Quarrying Specialist

62H--Concrete and Asphalt Equipment Operator

62J--General Construction Equulpment Operator

63B--LIght-Wheel Vehicle Mechanic

63D--Self-propelled Field Artillery System Mechanic

63E--MI ABRAMS Tank System Mechanic

63G--Fuel and Electrical Systems Repairer

63H--Track Vehicle Repairer

63J--Quartermaster and Chemical Equipment Repairer

63N--M6OAIIA3 Tank System Mechanic

63S--Heavy-Wheel Vehicle Mechanic

63T--Bradley Fighting Vehicle System Mechanic

63W--Wheel Vehicle Repairer

63Y--Track Vehicle Mechanic

67G--Utility Airplane Repairer

67N--UH-1 Helicopter Repairer

67R--AH-64 Attack Helicopter Repairer

67S--OH-58D Helicopter Repairer

67T--UH-60 Helicopter Repairer

67U--CH-47 Helicopter Repairer

67V--Observation/Scout Helicopter Repairer

67Y-AH-1 Attack Helicopter Repairer

68B--Aircraft Powerplant Repairer

68D--Aircraft Powertrain Repairer

68F--Aircraft Electrician

68G--Aircraft Structural Repairer

68H--Aircraft Pneudraulics Repairer

68J--Aircraft Armament/Missile Systems Repairer

68X--AH-64 Armament/Electrical Systems Repairer

71D--Legal Specialist

71G--Patient Administration Specialist

71L--Administrative Specialist

71M--Chaplain Assistant

73C--Finance Specialist

73D--Accounting Specialist

75B-Personnel Administration Specialist

75H--Personnel Services Specialist

76J--Medical Supply Specialist

77F--Petroteum Supply Specialist

77L--Petroleum Laboratory Specialist

77W--Water Treatment Specialist

88H--Cargo Specialist

88K--Watercraft Operator

88L--Watercraft Engineer

88M--Motor Transport Operator

88N--Transportatlon Management Coordinator

88P--Railway Equipment Repairer

88T--Railway SectionRepairer

88U--Railway Operations Crewmember

91A--Medical Equipment Repairer

91B--Medical Specialist

91C--Practical Nurse

91D--Operating Room Specialist

91E--Dental Specialist

91K--Medical Laboratory Specialist

91M--Hospital Food Service Specialist

91P--Radlology Specialist

91Q--Phanmacy Specialist

91R--Veterinary Food Inspection Specialist

91S--Preventive MedicIne Specialist

91T--Animal Care Specialist

91V--Respiratory Specialist

91X--Mental Health Specialist

92A--Automated Logistical Specialist

92G--Food Service Operations

92M--Mortuary Affairs Specialist

92R--Parachute Rigger

92Y--Unit Supply Specialist

93C--Air Traffic Control (ATC) Operator

93F--Field Artillery Meteorological Crewmember

95C--Correctlons Specialist
 

Ex-SHAD

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The following now require a security clearance, and as per the M48-M60 Armored Crewman MOS, that doesn’t exist anymore.

25M-Multlmedia Illustrator

25R--Visual Information Equipment Operator

25VCombat Documentation/Production Specialist

35D--Air Traffic Control Equipment Repairer

19K-MI Armor Crewman

19E-M48--M60 Armor Crewman

46Q--Journalist

46R--Broadcast Journalist

63E--MI ABRAMS Tank System Mechanic

63T--Bradley Fighting Vehicle System Mechanic

71M--Chaplain Assistant

93C--Air Traffic Control (ATC) Operator

93F--Field Artillery Meteorological Crewmember

95C--Corrections Specialist
 
M

MikeL

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Ex-SHAD said:
and as per the M48-M60 Armored Crewman MOS, that doesn’t exist anymore.

Neither does 11H and 11M, and I'm sure theres a couple others

IMO it would just make things simpler to just have a US citizenship if you want to join the US Military then get the Canadian one back when you are done.  Being able to get a security clearance would open more doors in the Military.
 

tomahawk6

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There is one place you can go to find out your options and that is MEPS. I apologize for the out of date list.

http://www.mepcom.army.mil/meps/indianapolis/index.html
 

LineDoggie

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Umm, had 2 Canadians with Dual Citizenship in my Infantry company in Baghdad. and as for security clearances, that might work for Pvt to SPC. but to become an NCO your going to need to have one. We had them for every 11B in the Bn.
 

Blackadder1916

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-Skeletor- said:
IMO it would just make things simpler to just have a US citizenship if you want to join the US Military then get the Canadian one back when you are done.  Being able to get a security clearance would open more doors in the Military.

Renouncing and regaining Canadian citizenship is not so simple as waking up in the morning, declaring you don't want to be a Canuck anymore and not using your passport - and then ("when you are done") showing up at the border and saying you've come home for hockey and real beer, eh.

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/citizenship/renounce.asp
Renouncing citizenship

In some situations, you might decide that you want to renounce (give up) your Canadian citizenship. For example, if you are or want to become a citizen of a country that does not allow dual citizenship, you may have to renounce your Canadian citizenship.

For a renunciation of Canadian citizenship to be recognized in Canada, you must make a formal application to renounce your citizenship.

If you renounce your Canadian citizenship, you will lose all the rights and privileges of Canadian citizenship. For example:

You will lose the right to travel under a Canadian passport.
You will lose the right to vote.
If you want to return to Canada as a permanent resident, you will have to go through the immigration process.
 
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MikeL

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Blackadder1916 said:
Renouncing and regaining Canadian citizenship is not so simple as waking up in the morning, declaring you don't want to be a Canuck anymore and not using your passport - and then ("when you are done") showing up at the border and saying you've come home for hockey and real beer, eh.

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/citizenship/renounce.asp

I never said it was an easy or quick process. Just giving them an idea of a possible thing to do, up to them to do the leg work and find out exactly whats involved in the process.
 

Ex-SHAD

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If I’m not mistaken, it currently takes about 6 months to fully renounce your Canadian Citizenship.
 

Castus

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A few friends of mine in my Bn are interested in possibly joining the US Army or Marines as infantrymen. None of them have citizenships, though, and when they looked online there wasn't a whole lot of information on the possible processes, if any.

If it is possible for them to join, would they need to get green cards?
Would any of their Canadian experience/qualifications matter, or would they start from the beginning, if they could even join at all?

I figured this thread, already opened, was probably the best way to ask for them since none of them have milnet accounts, and I do. Any help would be much appreciated and enlightening.

Thanks
 
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MikeL

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Castus, unless they have an immediate family member who has a green card or US citizenship they can not join the US Military.

The immediate family member with the green card/citizenship is needed to sponser them for their green card.

And no, experience gained in the CF won't help them get in or write off courses, they would have to start out as a E-1 Private/Recruit and goto Basic, etc

Random FYI serving in a foriegn military(non-US) disqualifies you from joining the USAF.

A few years back I looked into joining the US Army(Infantry) and USAF(TACP) and talked to INS(US Immigration) and recruiters and that is what I was told.
 

Ex-SHAD

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Citizens of foreign nations who have served in their nations armed forces may still apply for the USAF, but they're restricted to ASFC's such as Security Forces and of course the non-security clearance professions.

As per CF experience, it's worthless to a US Recruiter!

 

Ex-SHAD

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It should be noted that if you have gone to college, you will enter as an E-3 rather than an E-1.

In the end it's all about credit hours, and not semester hours!
 
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