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"Why you’ve never heard of this RCMP officer who shot Parliament Hill gunman"

The Bread Guy

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This from the National Post ...
There are days when it’s hard to be a hero. Just ask Curtis Barrett.

Two years ago, the RCMP corporal shot Michael Zehaf-Bibeau in the head in Parliament’s Hall of Honour, just minutes after the 32-year-old Zehaf-Bibeau had fired three bullets into the back of Corporal Nathan Cirillo, an unarmed member of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada, who was posted at the National War Memorial in Ottawa.

An Ontario Provincial Police report into the terror attack on Parliament Hill on October 22, 2014, concluded that Zehaf-Bibeau “presented a serious and imminent threat to the lives of all persons inside Centre Block,” including Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the entire Conservative caucus meeting in the Reading Room, just off the Hall of Honour.

The report concluded that the House of Commons’ former Sergeant-at-Arms, Kevin Vickers, and Barrett “fired their weapons and neutralized the threat.”

But while Vickers was hailed as a hero by the nation and appointed Canada’s ambassador to Ireland, Barrett’s contribution was buried, redacted and generally forgotten, leading him into a downward spiral of post-traumatic stress.

After two years, the RCMP has finally recognized the valour of Barrett, and the three other officers who walked into gunfire that day — he will receive the Star of Courage from the Governor-General at a ceremony next Friday. But Barrett’s story is a cautionary tale about how this country treats those of its sons and daughters who put themselves at great peril to keep the rest of us safe ...
 

Jarnhamar

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I'm not sure if I understand the context of that story.  Not being recognized as a hero and given credit for shooting Bibeau caused him to develop PTSD?  Is that just bad wording?
 

RedcapCrusader

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Jarnhamar said:
I'm not sure if I understand the context of that story.  Not being recognized as a hero and given credit for shooting Bibeau caused him to develop PTSD?  Is that just bad wording?

I think it was more so the fact that nobody believed him (therapists etc) because the media reported one version of facts, and because he was never mentioned people essentially said he was making it up.

Which contributed to his inability to cope,  receive help, and get his life back on track.


That's what I took away from it any way.
 

George Wallace

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Jarnhamar said:
I'm not sure if I understand the context of that story.  Not being recognized as a hero and given credit for shooting Bibeau caused him to develop PTSD?  Is that just bad wording?

What I took away from it, causing the PTSD, was not the lack of recognition and credit for the shooting; but the treatment he suffered by being basically ignored and forgotten by those who should have been there to support him, the RCMP.  They had him in limbo and even lost all records of his being present at the shooting and any interviews he had had.  He went without medical and/or psych treatment, and had no form of counselling for over a year. 
 

The Bread Guy

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George Wallace said:
What I took away from it, causing the PTSD, was not the lack of recognition and credit for the shooting; but the treatment he suffered by being basically ignored and forgotten by those who should have been there to support him, the RCMP.  They had him in limbo and even lost all records of his being present at the shooting and any interviews he had had.  He went without medical and/or psych treatment, and had no form of counselling for over a year.
That's what I read into it, too.
 
J

jollyjacktar

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Once again, the Force seems to be lacking in support for it's members.  Shameful.
 

Jarnhamar

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LunchMeat said:
I think it was more so the fact that nobody believed him (therapists etc) because the media reported one version of facts, and because he was never mentioned people essentially said he was making it up.

Which contributed to his inability to cope,  receive help, and get his life back on track.


That's what I took away from it any way.
Makes a lot of sense ya!

Sucks he was treated that way for sure.
 

Kirkhill

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...

“The whole world wasn’t buying into my story because it wasn’t the story in the media,” he said. “Shooting a terrorist on Parliament Hill is not something that gives you PTSD. I’m so proud that no-one else got shot. It went as well as it could have gone. But no-one stood up for us. I broke my television when (Green Party leader) Liz May said the RCMP is good at giving out tickets on Parliament Hill but not at stopping terrorists.”

(May gave a speech in the House of Commons in May 2015, criticizing the RCMP for stopping MPs on their way to the Hill but not noticing a man with a gun.)

“It was heartbreaking to hear that you’re a failure for not stopping this guy,” Barrett said.

He said his life went into a downward spiral — he stopped participating in Beaver Scouts with his sons and his relationship ended because his girlfriend said he was so caught up in his own issues.

“I was a bit of a mess,” he admits.

The feeling of being abandoned was reinforced when, reviewing his status almost a year after the event, the RCMP’s Health Services division said it had no record of Barrett being involved in the shooting.

“These are the people supposed to be looking after me. All the psychologist reports were lost. I lost my mind. I said: ‘How can you clear me to go back to work when you don’t know I was in a shooting?’”

...

From the original article.

Clearly shooting somebody WAS a big thing.  Especially when hearing the crack before the bang.  To have that effort belittled and then discover that even your chain of command is unaware of your involvement......

I think that is where he is coming from.
 

brihard

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For those who are interested, here's Cpl Barrett's comments on this article. He posted this in an RCMP facebook group and said people could feel free to share

Cpl Barrett said:
Hi everyone. Thank you for all of the supportive messages. A lot of the positive things I wanted to come out in the article were there and John Ivison did a fair account. But i cannot stress enough that I was not alone. Many RCMP and Parliament hill security risked their lives. And only by their actions did the conditions exist for me to do what I did.

Pat flood who saw the gunman and called us into action. who's voice I hear everyday in my mind.

Parliament hill security guard Sameron Son who tried to disarm Bibeau at the enterence, incredibly brave. Another guard and friend max Melo who stood his ground at the top of the stairs when all else scrambled for cover and was almost shot point blank by Bibeau, other guards Louis letourneau and Charles thom who laid down fire on Bibeau keeping him pinned down by the library. Michelle, Gary,Somoza, Sylvie, Mike p, pat, and herb were right there with us in the gunfire and smoke. Kevin vickers who indeed did have a incredible amount of courage to throw himself down in front of a gunman. Ottawa police and out ert teams who were inside moments after the shooting and then for the whole day and night felt the confusion and stress.

Ottawa police took me and Karl d under their wing at the funeral. Nathan Cirillos family who made me feel good about what I had done, and Marcus Cirillo who made me wish I could have done more.
And my brothers for life, Richard Rozon, Dany Daigle and Martin Frazier who marched down the middle of the hall of honor with me towards gunfire in a textbook successful iard formation. All of us were ready to take bullets to save people in parliament. Our teamwork under pressure and under fire still blows me away.

My story is just a sample of all of the hardships most of the members and hill security went through after the shooting. Terrorist or not taking a human life after that person tries to take yours and the stresses that came after were intense for all.

The term loneliest hero was coined by the press. But I assure you, I was not alone on October 22 2014. It took an entire team to save lives, protect the prime minster and end the attack.
Everyone of us has felt alone at some point since that day.

Cpl Curtis Keith Darryl Barrett
 

mariomike

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"All of us were ready to take bullets to save people"

Although unable to save Cpl. Cirillo's life, the City of Ottawa Paramedics who "Without regard for their own safety responded into a chaotic, uncontrolled scene" also received  bravery medals.
 

The Bread Guy

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Medals being presented Friday - from the GG's Info-machine ...
... STAR OF COURAGE

Constable Curtis Barrett, S.C.
Chelsea, Quebec
RCMP Corporal Dany Daigle, S.C.
Ottawa, Ontario
RCMP Constable Martin Fraser, S.C.
Gatineau, Quebec
Constable Louis Létourneau, S.C.
Gatineau, Quebec
RCMP Sergeant Richard Rozon, S.C.
Gatineau, Quebec
Constable Samearn Son, S.C.
Ottawa, Ontario
Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, S.C.
Miramichi, New Brunswick and Dublin, Ireland
RCMP Constable Michelle Bergeron, M.B.
Ottawa, Ontario
RCMP Constable Gary Bubelis, M.B.
Spencerville, Ontario
RCMP Constable Somoza Célestin, M.B.
Ottawa, Ontario
Corporal Maxim Malo, M.B.
Gatineau, Quebec
RCMP Constable Sylvie Marcoux, M.B.
Embrun, Ontario
RCMP Constable Michel Palmer, M.B.
Rockland, Ontario
RCMP Constable Patrick Ruest, M.B.
Embrun, Ontario
Constable Charles Thom, M.B.
Ottawa, Ontario
RCMP Constable Herbert Waye, M.B.
Oxford Mills, Ontario 

On October 22, 2014, members of the House of Commons Security Services and the RCMP were instrumental in stopping an armed man who had stormed the Centre Block of the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa, Ontario. Constable Son was stationed at the front entrance when he spotted the man entering with a concealed rifle. The constable lunged to gain control of the firearm, but it discharged and struck him in the leg. Drawn to the Rotunda by the noise, Corporal Malo and Constable Thom took cover and exchanged several rounds with the gunman after he entered the building. Constable Létourneau tracked the gunman down the Hall of Honour toward the Library of Parliament and fired at him several times. RCMP Sergeant Rozon, Corporal Daigle and constables Barrett, Bergeron, Bubelis, Célestin, Fraser, Marcoux, Palmer, Ruest and Waye, who had assembled outside the Peace Tower, entered the Centre Block. Supported by their colleagues, Sergeant Rozon, Corporal Daigle and constables Barrett and Fraser assumed a tactical formation (IARD) as they charged down the Hall of Honour. With the shooter now cornered in an alcove leading to the Library, Sergeant-at-Arms Vickers, after being advised of the shooter’s location, dove to the floor in front of him and fired his weapon. RCMP Constable Barrett walked directly toward the gunman while also firing his weapon. The collective actions of these 16 individuals brought the incident to an end in less than three minutes, and avoided further tragedy.

The Bravery Decorations awarded to other members of the group were presented to them at a previous ceremony. ...
 
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