Author Topic: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans  (Read 31282 times)

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Offline the 48th regulator

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Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« on: June 01, 2016, 22:31:45 »
Hello,

Those of you that don't know me, I am John Tescione.

I served Canada for over 25 years.  18 in CAF as and Infanteer, and 7 plus as a civilian for DND/VAC as a Peer Support Coordinator.

During my service, I was physically wound in an ambush, took 7 gunshot wounds and shrapnel.  I healed quickly.  One of the few things I did not care for was my mind.  I discovered army.ca and found that many people understood me, even though the stigma of PTSD was rampant.  This site was the first place I found Peer Support.

I, like many others, have also fallen victim to the prescribed pharmaceuticals that are given to many veterans.   Yes, many work, but they also bring along side effects that far worst than the original symptoms.   I discovered Cannabis, like most people do.  Friend of a friend.  I knew it was not right.  So two years ago, I sought to get my prescription and make it legal.  My Psychiatrist was all for it, but because she was against smoking so would not prescribe it.....I talked to people I knew in the industry, and was given a list of Doctors that were empathetic to Medical Cannabis. 

I booked my appointment, and after an intense interview, I was given a prescription for my PTSD, with an emphasis to pick strains for my physical pains.    PICK MY OWN STRAINS.

You see folks, when people are wounded, most times, physical or Mental, you lose control.  Medical Cannabis was the first therapy, where I was EMPOWERED to take charge of my own health.  I can choose, what strain, what Oil, what amount based on how I feel, and what I need!!  Not rely on a hand full of peas from a manufactured drug, hoping to hit my pain of the day, with he added side effects.

I was taking control of my health.

VAC was phenomenal, and rushed the approval, and I was signed up with a licensed producer!!!  I could order by phone or online, and I would get delivery next day to my doorstep.  None of my other Medication was treated with the same respect!   I love my life now.  So a year ago I decided to open up Green Veterans Canada, a Facebook group dedicated to Canadian Veterans and Medical Cannabis!!

I am proud to say we are the largest Canadian orient group of this kind!!!  I was at the LIFT Conference, and found out we are getting noticed by many many people in the community!!!!!  Woot  Woot!!!!

With that all being said, I approached Mike Bobbit and asked if I could provide a thread similar to my peer group for Milnet.ca and all of it's sites.  Mike was all over it!!!!  This thread is about helping Veterans and their families.



WHAT THIS WILL NOT BE IS A THREAD TO DEBATE THE MERITS OF MEDICAL CANNABIS

This was created for Veterans and their Families interested about Medical Cannabis without fear of being admonished.

If you feel that your convictions are true, then you are more than welcome to approach Mike Bobbit about starting your own thread.

Also, the thread will be locked.  However if you have  any questions, or would like to add information, please Private Message me.

MUST READ FOR ALL SERVING MEMBERS

CMP Guidance on  Marijuana (Cannabis) for Medical use.


Ourselves Alone

Tess




« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 20:15:49 by kratz »
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Offline Lumber

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2016, 08:30:26 »
Has medical cannabis ever been prescribed to a serving member for their PTSD?
“Extremes to the right and to the left of any political dispute are always wrong.”
― Dwight D. Eisenhower


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Offline the 48th regulator

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2016, 08:44:56 »
Has medical cannabis ever been prescribed to a serving member for their PTSD?


Yes, however these are the challenges;

Those that have served, and been prescribed Medical Cannabis were members with injuries severe enough that would place them in breach of Universality of service so they were already transitioning out of the military.  Otherwise, the Cannabis will place you on MELs that will breach universality of service.

Second, DND/CAF does not cover Medical Cannabis under their spectrum of care, and VAC will not touch you while you are serving.  Therefore you would be footing the bill until your release, and then VAC will cover it.

I hope that sounded clear, I have not got a coffee yet!  :P
I know that I’m not perfect and that I don’t claim to be, so before you point your fingers make sure your hands are clean.

Offline Lumber

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2016, 08:54:17 »
...
I hope that sounded clear, I have not got a coffee yet!  :P

No it's perfectly clear; it's a perfect catch-22. Either you're on your way out, so no big deal, or using it will send you out. Either way, if you're using it, you won't be a serving member much longer.

I am surprised, though, that we would prescribe it to serving members at all, simply because of the hardline stance the military has on it's use.
“Extremes to the right and to the left of any political dispute are always wrong.”
― Dwight D. Eisenhower


Death before dishonour! Nothing before coffee!

Offline the 48th regulator

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2016, 08:58:45 »
No it's perfectly clear; it's a perfect catch-22. Either you're on your way out, so no big deal, or using it will send you out. Either way, if you're using it, you won't be a serving member much longer.

I am surprised, though, that we would prescribe it to serving members at all, simply because of the hardline stance the military has on it's use.

You are bang on the money with that.  Very few people have been given a prescription, and those wer for severe injuires or terminal illness.
I know that I’m not perfect and that I don’t claim to be, so before you point your fingers make sure your hands are clean.

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2016, 09:11:03 »


Health Canada's Guide in Medical Use of Marijuana

Medical Use of Marijuana

Learn about licensing and compliance and enforcement for producers of marijuana for medical purposes. Find procedures for accessing marijuana for medical purposes and frequently asked questions. Obtain information for licensed producers, healthcare practitioners, law enforcement and local government.

Dried marijuana is not an approved drug or medicine in Canada. The Government of Canada does not endorse the use of marijuana, but the courts have required reasonable access to a legal source of marijuana when authorized by a healthcare practitioner.


The Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR) came into force in June 2013. The regulations create conditions for a commercial industry that is responsible for the production and distribution of marijuana for medical purposes. They also make sure that Canadians with a medical need can access quality controlled marijuana grown under secure and sanitary conditions.
A strict and rigorous application process

All applications to produce marijuana for medical purposes undergo a strict and rigorous review.

    When an application is received it undergoes an initial screening to ensure that it is complete. Complete applications undergo a more in depth screening on key elements of the MMPR.
    The application is thoroughly reviewed to ensure compliance with all the requirements of the MMPR. This includes but is not limited to security measures, good production practices, packaging, labelling, shipping, and record keeping.
    A pre-licence inspection occurs once the physical site is ready and the results of the security clearance checks have been received.
    Key personnel must have a valid security clearance in order to be licensed.

The timeframe for processing applications is highly variable - sometimes taking well over a year to complete. The quality, completeness and complexity of applications are key variables influencing application processing times. Applicants should expect several rounds of communication with the Department during the application process.

More information about the application process can be found on our Application Process web page.
Ensuring health and safety for Canadians

Licences are issued only after it is determined:

    there is no risk to public health, safety and security;
    the applicant has met the security requirements outlined in the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR);
    all the requisite security clearances have been obtained;
    there are no other grounds for refusing the application; and,
    The application otherwise satisfies the conditions for obtaining a licence outlined in the MMPR.

Regulations no longer in effect

The Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR) were repealed on March 31, 2014. However, as a result of a Federal Court Order granted on March 21, 2014, individuals who were previously authorized to possess and produce marijuana under the MMAR, and who meet the terms of the Federal Court order, will be able to continue to do so on an interim basis until the Court reaches a final decision.  As ordered by the Court, individuals with an Authorization to Possess valid on March 21, 2014, may hold a maximum quantity of dried marijuana as specified by their Authorization to Possess or 150 grams, whichever is less.
Individuals with a medical need

Individuals with a medical need who do not fall within the scope of this Court order and who have the support of a licensed healthcare practitioner may consult Procedures for Accessing Marijuana for Medical Purposes.


I know that I’m not perfect and that I don’t claim to be, so before you point your fingers make sure your hands are clean.

Offline gryphonv

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2016, 09:26:43 »
This is something I'm going to investigate for my condition when I get out. I am being medical released for chronic shin splints and unfortunately all the meds I had to address the pain/inflammation cause other side effects (indigestion). I went over a year with indigestion and all the nasty things that entails. I essentially have daily pain but I can manage it by avoiding things that will inflame it. With all that said I do have a recognized and approved diagnosis though VAC. Hopefully I can explore THC edible meds in the future with VAC support.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2016, 11:20:56 by gryphonv »

Offline the 48th regulator

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2016, 12:32:19 »
"They" (if you mean your CAF docs, either uniformed or the civi contractors in the garrison clinics) will not prescribe it.

You are correct, however there have been those that have received the prescription, in the instances I have described.
I know that I’m not perfect and that I don’t claim to be, so before you point your fingers make sure your hands are clean.

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2016, 12:41:58 »
MUST READ FOR ALL SERVING MEMBERS

CMP Guidance on  Marijuana (Cannabis) for Medical use.

This is the latest directive, it is one years old.  I don't have access to a DWAN computer, but is the most up to date copy that I have.

If you find a later version, please by all means upload file, or PM me.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2016, 18:25:10 by John Tescione »
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Offline dangerboy

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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2016, 12:50:00 »
Here is the link for those with DWAN access http://cmp-cpm.mil.ca/en/health/policies-direction/policies/4200-10.page.  The version John uploaded is still the most current.
All right, they're on our left, they're on our right, they're in front of us, they're behind us... they can't get away this time.
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2016, 14:59:47 »

https://medreleaf.com/the-word-marijuana-versus-the-word-cannabis


The Word “Marijuana” Versus the Word “Cannabis”


Why do we call marijuana marijuana?

Growing up, I assumed that “marijuana” was the original Latin name for the plant I discuss every week in this column. But that’s not the case.

Cannabis is its actual name. Cannabis is the genus that contains the three psychoactive plants we love so well: Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, and their stubby cousin Cannabis ruderalis. However, cannabis is far more commonly referred to as marijuana. Why?

The term “marijuana” came to the United States via Mexico. How it came to Mexico is still a mystery. Scholar Alan Piper made a valiant attempt at its etymology in a 2005 issue of the academic journal Sino-Platonic Papers, but came to the conclusion that it could have come from China, or maybe Spain, or maybe it was already in North America.

“Of all the multifarious terms associated with the cannabis plant,” he wrote, “marihuana is one of the most universally recognized and used in the English-speaking world, yet its origins remain deeply obscure.” He goes on to say, “The word marijuana, together with the use of herbal cannabis as an intoxicant, is consistently identified as coming into the USA from Mexico, being brought there by migrant workers.”

That key phrase—”the use of herbal cannabis as an intoxicant”—could explain why we still call cannabis marijuana today.

In 1930, Harry Anslinger, the head of the brand-new Federal Bureau of Narcotics, was unsatisfied with regulating only cocaine and opium. When he went in front of a congressional panel in 1937 to push his pot prohibition bill, he said, “We seem to have adopted the Mexican terminology, and we call it marihuana.”

While he sounds all innocent there, like he just picked up the word from who knows where, many surmise that he was actively using the term to focus the discussion on recreational use. His terminology distanced the plant as much as possible from its common medical and industrial uses, where it was more often referred to as cannabis or hemp. Using “marijuana,” most commonly associated with recreational use among poor Mexican immigrants, was a sneaky bit of branding for the bill he wanted passed.

Dr. William C. Woodward, legislative counsel of the American Medical Association, showed up to the same 1937 hearing to protest Anslinger’s feigned semantic innocence, accusing him of switching the name to fool groups that would have otherwise been opposed to the bill.
“I use the word ‘cannabis’ in preference to the word ‘marihuana,’ because cannabis is the correct term for describing the plant and its products,” Woodward said. “It was the use of the term ‘marihuana’ rather than the use of the term ‘cannabis’ or the use of the term ‘Indian hemp’ that was responsible, as you realized, probably, a day or two ago, for the failure of the dealers in Indian hempseed to connect up this bill with their business until rather late in the day.”

As an example of the racial dimension of Anslinger’s animus toward cannabis, here’s one of his quotes on the subject: “There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos, and entertainers. Their satanic music, jazz, and swing, result from marijuana use,” he said. “This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers, and any others.”

William Randolph Hearst was also happy to lend his newspaper empire to the cause of pot prohibition, printing such inflammatory bullshit in nationally syndicated columns as: “Was it marijuana, the new Mexican drug, that nerved the murderous arm of Clara Phillips when she hammered out her victim’s life in Los Angeles?… Three-fourths of the crimes of violence in this country today are committed by dope slaves—that is a matter of cold record.”

This use of the term represents a marked linguistic shift. As NPR reported in 2013, “Throughout the 19th century, news reports and medical journal articles almost always use the plant’s formal name, cannabis.”


No matter how you slice it, the rise of the term marijuana is suspiciously contemporaneous with its popularity in racist screeds. To that end, I’m going to stop using the word “marijuana” in this column, except in proper names, quotations, or where it is part of the seemingly inseparable alliterative pairing “medical marijuana” (after all, “medical marijuana” has specific regulatory policy attached to it).

While the word doesn’t carry the same racist connotations it once did, I see no reason to use it when “cannabis” or “pot” or “weed” work fine. And I’m not alone.

Harborside Health Center, one of California’s largest and most influential dispensaries, has a page on its website devoted to the issue.

“The word ‘marijuana’ or ‘marihuana’ is an emotional, pejorative term that has played a key role in creating the negative stigma that still tragically clings to this holistic, herbal medicine,” it reads. “Most cannabis users recognize the ‘M word’ as offensive, once they learn its history. We prefer to use the word cannabis, because it is a respectful, scientific term that encompasses all the many different uses of the plant.”

I asked a person of color who is knowledgeable about pot—someone who runs a socially conscious (and sadly illegal) cannabis delivery service—what they thought. “We are very vocally against that word and fully support whatever action you choose to take against its use,” they said. “It’s 100 percent racist terminology.”


by Tobias Coughlin-Bogue of The Stranger 
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2016, 15:02:12 »

https://medreleaf.com/canada-and-israel


Canada and Israel are going to pot together


TORONTO — When Neil Closner, the former vice president of Business Development for Toronto’s world-renowned Mount Sinai Hospital, found himself a bit cynical about his latest job offer, it took a trip to Safed, Israel, to help him make up his mind.   Closner is now the CEO of MedReleaf, a licensed producer and supplier of medical cannabis which works out of a 55,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility in Markham, Ontario, just minutes east of Toronto. He had no background in this area, and swears that he’s never even had so much as a drag on a cigarette.   But when Stephen Arbib, CEO of MENA Investment Network, the company behind MedReleaf, approached him about the job, Closner wasn’t convinced that the medical pot business was anything more than a legal way for people to get high.   “When I left Mount Sinai, I knew that I wanted to be part of a successful business, but I also knew that it would have to be a business in which we were helping people with the quality of their lives; to help improve the world, bit by bit,” says Closner.   So Closner made the 13-hour plane ride to Israel to visit Tikun Olam, Israel’s first and largest government-approved producer of medical cannabis. Known as the start-up nation for its entrepreneurial spirit, Israel is also one of the most progressive medical cannabis markets on the globe.   Closner soon found himself in a senior citizen nursing home on a kibbutz about an hour outside of Tel Aviv where Tikun Olam had been running clinical trials of the effects of medical cannabis on its patients for two years.   After spending a day visiting with several seniors and hearing their personal stories, Closner knew he had found his new business, one that melded nicely with the Jewish values he had grown up with in Toronto’s Jewish community.   “I went room to room, meeting with at least a dozen of these octogenarians, and each one of them told me their stories about how their lives were totally transformed by cannabis, most of which really blew my mind,” says Closner.   Among the seniors he chatted with, Closner relates a particularly heartfelt and emotional tale of a patient suffering from dementia.   Unable to eat or go to the bathroom by himself, the man needed 24-hour care, someone to literally spoon-feed him every day lest he succumb to malnutrition. After taking a couple of cannabis capsules daily, he soon found himself not only eating on his own, but able to take care of his bathroom needs without anybody’s help.   A gentleman in the facility, a painter, could no longer hold a brush due to the tremors brought on by Parkinson’s. After taking a daily capsule, his tremors lessened, allowing him to get back to the activity he loved.   Closner quickly identified another vital benefit of the business.   “What really got me interested in accepting this new challenge with MedReleaf was when I realized the economic impact it could have,” says Closner. “As the baby-boomers in North America, and around the world, continue to age, I realized that we simply don’t have the caregivers to take care of each and every one, especially those who require around-the-clock-care. And, even if we did, the cost would be enormous.”   Closner realized that if seniors can take a capsule with a tiny amount of cannabis that helps them get o the point where they can become even a bit more self-sufficient and content, “it could save society an enormous amount of money in the long run.”   “After my time in that Israeli nursing home, I got back on the plane, saying to myself, ‘Wow, this business is legitimate. Let’s get back to Canada, fill out the forms for Health Canada, and let’s start improving lives,” says Closner.   And what more appropriate partner could there have been for MedReleaf than a company called “Tikun Olam,” (Hebrew for “repairing the world”)?   “Our partnership with Tikun Olam gives us a significant scientific advantage,” says Closner. “We have access to treatment data from more than 7,000 of their patients, that will give us great insight into the effectiveness and efficacy of various strains and, in turn, an advanced ability to work with patients and physicians to create the most beneficial treatment protocols. The partnership also provides us with exclusive access to an array of proprietary medical cannabis varieties.” Two of the varieties to which Closner refers are Erez, the best-selling variety in Israel, and AviDekel. Erez, with its high tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content, is well known for treating sleep disorders and managing pain, nausea, inflammation, and indigestion. AviDekel, a sativa-dominant strain, contains very high levels of cannabidiol (CBD), and virtually no THC, which, by the way, means no “getting high.” CBD is a non-psychoactive compound found in cannabis that has been shown to have a positive impact on disorders such as multiple sclerosis, arthritis and epilepsy, amongst other ailments. As you’d expect from Closner’s hospital background, a tour of MedReleaf’s Markham facility is impressive, almost awe-inspiring. With rooms cleaner than an operating room, employees constantly monitored via video surveillance, a decontamination room, and staff gowned up head to toe with white clean-room suits, masks, gloves, hair nets and booties part of their daily working uniform, MedReleaf, which trademarked its product, “medical grade standard,” has clearly gone above and beyond the regulations and requirements of Health Canada. “Health Canada pays us regular and frequent surprise inspections, so we always need to be operating at the top of our game,” says Closner. “We are focused on building a pharma-like company, even if Health Canada doesn’t yet consider cannabis an official drug. We are building this business with the assumption that at some point, that will change.” The facility includes a “Mother Room,” where, upon passing through an airlock that could have been on the set of the sequel to “2001: A Space Odyssey,” there are rows and rows of plants flourishing under 1,000 watt lights. From there, the plants are trimmed, clones are made, and they are moved to one of the facility’s flower rooms. There, many thousands of plants grow under intense lights and are regularly fed nutrients for about two months before being harvested. MedReleaf, still growing and already looking for other facilities, will soon have as many as 10 flower rooms and will grow some 150,000 plants at any one time. At the end of its processing, the medical cannabis is vacuum-sealed, picked up by Canada Post, and delivered to patients. In partnership with Tikun Olam, MedReleaf is also currently collaborating on nearly two dozen cannabis-related research studies with doctors and professors at eight leading hospitals in Israel including the Hadassah Medical Centre in Jerusalem, Wolfson Medical Centre in Holon, Sheba Medical Center at Tel hashomer, Meir Medical Center in Kfar Saba and Tel Aviv’s Sourasky Medical Centre. “With MedReleaf, what we’ve aimed for is a combination of Israeli ingenuity which has led that country to become a world leader in the research and application of medicinal cannabis, and Canadian growing experience and mastery, which is incomparable,” says Arbib. “Combining the strengths of these two great nations, we’ve created value which will provide tremendous benefits to doctors, researchers, and most important of all, patients,” says Arbib. [Article originally published here]
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2016, 15:19:45 »
Testimonials.










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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2016, 15:51:13 »
[img=http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/marihuana/info/list-eng.php]http://Authorized Licensed Producers under the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations[/img]

Authorized Licensed Producers under the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations

The map below shows all licenses issued by Health Canada under the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR). Only producers who are authorized to produce and sell to the public may sell or provide dried marijuana, fresh marijuana or cannabis oil to eligible persons.





Number of licenses issued by province or territory Province or Territory    Number of licences
Nova Scotia    0
New Brunswick    1
Prince Edward Island    0
Newfoundland and Labrador    0
Quebec    1
Ontario    18
Manitoba    1
Saskatchewan    2
Alberta    1
British Columbia    7
Yukon    0
Northwest Territories    0
Nunavut    0
Canada (total)    31


List of Authorized Licensed Producers

The tables below contain all licensed producers who have been issued a licence by Health Canada. Contact information is only listed for licensed producers who are authorized to sell. The lists are sorted by alphabetical order. Please check this website regularly for updated information.
List of Authorized Licensed Producers of dried marijuana under the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations


ABcann Medicinals Inc.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    March 21, 2014    Valid    1-855-322-2266
Agripharm Corp.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    December 11, 2014    Valid    1-844-638-8786 (METTRUM)
AMMCan    ON    Cultivation Only    March 11, 2016    Valid    N/A
Aphria    ON    Cultivation and Sale    March 24, 2014    Valid    1-844-427-4742
Aurora Cannabis Enterprises Inc.    AB    Cultivation and Sale    February 17, 2015    Valid    1-844-9AURORA
Bedrocan Canada Inc.    ON    Sale Only    December 16, 2013    Valid    1-855-420-7887
Bedrocan Canada Inc.
(2nd site)    ON    Cultivation and Sale    February 17, 2015    Valid    1-855-420-7887
Broken Coast Cannabis Ltd.    BC    Cultivation and Sale    March 14, 2014    Valid    1-888-486-7579
Canna Farms Ltd.    BC    Cultivation and Sale    January 8, 2014    Valid    1-855-882-0988
CanniMed Ltd.    SK    Sale Only    September 19, 2013    Valid    1-855-787-1577
CannTrust Inc.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    June 12, 2014    Valid    1-855-794-2266
Delta 9 Bio-Tech Inc.    MB    Cultivation and Sale    March 18, 2014    Valid    1-855-245-1259
Emblem Cannabis Corp.    ON    Cultivation Only    August 26, 2015    Valid    N/A
Emerald Health Botanicals Inc.    BC    Cultivation and Sale    February 5, 2014    Valid    1-800-757-3536
Green Relief Inc.    ON    Cultivation Only    February 18, 2016    Valid    N/A
Hydropothecary    QC    Cultivation and Sale    March 14, 2014    Valid    1-844-406-1852
In The Zone Produce Ltd.    BC    Cultivation Only    February 26, 2014    Valid    1-800-420-1707
MariCann Inc.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    March 27, 2014    Valid    1-844-627-4226 (MARICANN)
MedReleaf Corp.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    February 14, 2014    Valid    1-855-4-Releaf (73-5323)
Mettrum (Bennett North) Ltd.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    November 1, 2013    Valid    1-844-638-8786 (METTRUM)
Mettrum Ltd.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    December 16, 2015    Valid    1-844-638-8786 (METTRUM)
OrganiGram Inc.    NB    Cultivation and Sale    March 26, 2014    Valid    1-855-961-9420
Peace Naturals Project Inc    ON    Cultivation and Sale    October 31, 2013    Valid    1-888-64-PEACE (73223)
Prairie Plant Systems Inc.    SK    Cultivation Only    September 19, 2013    Valid    N/A
RedeCan Pharm    ON    Cultivation and Sale    June 25, 2014    Valid    1-905-892-6788
THC Biomed Ltd.    BC    Cultivation Only    February 18, 2016    Valid    N/A
Tilray    BC    Cultivation and Sale    March 24, 2014    Valid    1-844-TILRAY1 (845-7291)
Tweed Farms Inc.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    August 8, 2014    Valid    N/A
Tweed Inc.    ON    Cultivation and Sale    November 18, 2013    Valid    1-855-55-TWEED (89333)
WeedMD    ON    Cultivation only    April 22, 2016    Valid    N/A
Whistler Medical Marijuana Corp.    BC    Cultivation and Sale    February 26, 2014    Valid    1-604-962-3440


List of Authorized Licensed Producers of fresh marijuana and cannabis oil Licensed producer    Province / Territory    Licence

Agripharm Corp.    ON    Production and Sale    August 28, 2015    Valid    1-844-638-8786 (METTRUM)
Aphria    ON    Production Only    August 26, 2015    Valid    N/A
Aurora Cannabis Enterprises Inc.    AB    Production Only    February 16, 2016    Valid    N/A
Bedrocan Canada Inc. (2nd site)    ON    Production Only    February 23, 2016    Valid    N/A
Broken Coast Cannabis Ltd.    BC    Production Only    November 3, 2015    Valid    N/A
Canna Farms Ltd.    BC    Production and Sale    November 6, 2015    Valid    1-855-882-0988
CanniMed Ltd.    SK    Sale Only    January 12, 2016    Valid    1-855-787-1577
CannTrust Inc.    ON    Production Only    August 26, 2015    Valid    N/A
Emerald Health Botanicals Inc.    BC    Production Only    November 6, 2015    Valid    N/A
Hydropothecary    QC    Production Only    August 6, 2015    Valid    N/A
MariCann Inc.    ON    Production Only    August 21, 2015    Valid    N/A
MedReleaf Corp.    ON    Production Only    August 19, 2015    Valid    N/A
Mettrum (Bennett North) Ltd.    ON    Production and Sale    October 1, 2015    Valid    1-844-638-8786 (METTRUM)
Mettrum Ltd.    ON    Production and Sale    March 11, 2016    Valid    1-844-638-8786 (METTRUM)
OrganiGram Inc.    NB    Production Only    February 23, 2016    Valid    N/A
Peace Naturals Project Inc    ON    Production and Sale    July 31, 2015    Valid    1-888-64-PEACE (73223)
Prairie Plant Systems Inc.    SK    Production Only    August 6, 2015    Valid    N/A
THC Biomed Ltd.    BC    Production Only    May 20, 2016    Valid    N/A
Tilray    BC    Production and Sale    August 6, 2015    Valid    1-844-TILRAY1 (845-7291)
Tweed Inc.    ON    Production and Sale    August 19, 2015    Valid    1-855-55-TWEED (89333)
Whistler Medical Marijuana Corp.    BC    Production and Sale    July 31, 2015    Valid    1-604-962-3440


Note: Some licensed producers may not be licensed for sale.

Cannabis is a controlled substance under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. To reduce the risk of diversion, factors such as physical capacity (size of building, physical security considerations, number of staff, cultivation technique), sale capacity, and inventory levels are considered before issuing a licence. Canada also reports annual production and consumption figures and inventories to the International Narcotics Control Board.
Compliance and Enforcement Actions

Health Canada conducts routine inspections of licensed producers of marijuana for medical purposes, to verify their ongoing compliance with the regulations. It is expected that licensed producers of marijuana for medical purposes will take timely and appropriate corrective actions when any issue of non-compliance with the MMPR is brought to their attention. Compliance is normally achieved through a cooperative approach between the regulated party and Health Canada; however, Health Canada has various tools of enforcement available, from warning letters and seizures to licence suspension, revocation and prosecution. For more information, visit the Compliance and Enforcement page.
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2016, 16:28:04 »
Jenny Migneault giving her testimonials.


Part 1


Part 2


Part 3


Part 4
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2016, 15:45:31 »
Hello Folks,

Posting this template of a VAC Service Summary of Assessment. I used just the first page of mine, so you have an idea what is required when applying for a Medical Cannabis Prescription. If you have a copy of this, the process is by far sped up. As I said in a previous Post, from time of prescription to time of holding product in my hand was a week!!

I advise all of you that do not have this to contact VAC ASAP and ask for a copy. Use my template as an example to explain to any VAC Rep you speak to.

Remember, you can also use your MY VAC Online account to speed up the process even further!

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask!!

Ourselves Alone

Tess
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2016, 16:05:22 »
Why Canada Just Became A World Leader On Medical Marijuana And PTSD



March 17, 2016 by James McClure

Canada is taking the lead on studying marijuana as a way to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

PTSD has become a hot-button issue among marijuana advocates. Right now, Canada and some American states including Michigan and Nevada recognize cannabis as a drug that can help veterans, first responders and others suffering from PTSD treat their symptoms. But New York, Illinois and other states that have legalized medical marijuana don't include PTSD as a qualified condition. And Veterans Affairs prohibits V.A. physicians from prescribing cannabis to American veterans.

But a landmark study by Canadian researchers could broaden and improve the use of marijuana for PTSD treatment. On Mar. 16, Apollo Research - a network of Canadian medical cannabis clinics that prescribe medical marijuana - announced that it's undertaking a cross-country study to investigate the effects marijuana has on patients with PTSD.

"This research study is a passion project and it is timely given the national attention that is being given to Veterans, First Responders and to mental health awareness overall," said Bryan Hendin, President of Apollo Applied Research - in a press release."There has been a lot of anecdotal evidence [in favor of using cannabis to treat PTSD] and now it's time for validated research."

The study will also investigate which strains are best for treating PTSD: "We have learned a lot...on what strains and prescribing methods work best for our chronic pain patients," said Hendin. The PTSD project will aim to do the same. And while Apollo is spearheading research, they hope to partner with Veterans Affairs Canada in the near future.

Canada poised to overtake American researchers

The project could make Canada a world leader in this field of research, outpacing studies in United States that are hampered by America's rigid drug laws.

"Currently in the United States, studies are stalled due to the lack of federal approval of using cannabis for testing," noted Hendin. "Strains of medical marijuana are classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is tightly controlled by the Food and Drug Administration. This presents a challenge for conducting studies with American veterans who are struggling with PTSD. Canada is positioned to be a leader in medical cannabis research."

That bureaucratic stalemate hindering American cannabis research isn't likely to improve any time soon. Groups like the Cato Institute and others groups have have called on the American government to reschedule cannabis. But the DEA has refused to budge on the issue. And the Obama administration has decided not to take action on marijuana unless legislation comes from Congress, where numerous bills that would liberalize the nation's laws have stalled, including the CARERS Act - a bipartisan bill that would change the drug scheduling and recognize the value of medical marijuana.

But further research such as the Apollo study could pressure the American government to recognize the medical value of cannabis, and to help veterans and other patients with PTSD gain access to medical marijuana.


https://www.civilized.life/canada-ptsd-medical-marijuana-1668611701.html


Please contact me via PM if you are interested in Participating in this study.
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2016, 16:13:02 »

Canadian war veteran turns to pot to cope with PTSD


Medicinal marijuana helped the former combat engineer gain control of his life.





Noah Starr, a former Canadian Armed Forces combat engineer from Fredericton, N.B.


By: Staff Torstar News Service Published on Mon Jan 04 2016

It took six deaths on Easter Sunday, 2007, for Noah Starr’s life to unravel.

It would take five years, thousands of pills, lost relationships and the discovery of medical marijuana before he won back some semblance of control.

“People call marijuana a gateway drug and it absolutely is. It’s been the gateway to my recovery,” said the former Canadian Armed Forces combat engineer from Fredericton, N.B.

“I’ve had times when I was in the hospital because I didn’t know where to turn. I have been one of those soldiers.”

Starr, now 31, can trace his troubles through the dust and dirt of Afghanistan to a road about 75 km west of Kandahar City. It was there on April 8, 2007, that an improvised explosive device exploded as a light armoured vehicle carrying Sgt. Donald Lucas of the 2nd Batallion of the Royal Canadian Regiment and the five other young men under his charge drove past.

Starr, whose job was to inspect Kandahar’s routes for roadside bombs, was working with another team a short distance away and was among the first to respond.

“It hit really close to home because I was wearing the exact same uniform that these guys were wearing. It made it very real for me and I think it put into perspective what could happen,” he said.

He kept coming back to the attack in his head. He chastised himself for feeling lucky that his friends had been switched out of the convoy at the last minute. The pictures of the dead men, the pictures of their families and the images of recently delivered Valentine’s Day cards etched themselves into Starr’s mind.

He put on a brave face, telling a Canadian reporter nearly two months later that, “I feel we are making an incredible difference. You know, just seeing kids on the street waving to us.”

But Starr was acutely aware he was suffering psychological problems and he told his superiors he needed help. Help, at that point in the Afghan mission, was a prescription for medication and access to a social worker to help him deal with his health needs while overseas. He trusted then that the military was equipped to help him deal with his difficulties.

It wasn’t until September 2007, when he returned to CFB Gagetown in New Brunswick and found there were only two psychiatrists available for the entire 2,000-member battle group that had just returned from war, that his confidence was rattled.

“It took me six months before I even saw a doctor,” he said. “It wasn’t until January of 2008 that I had a working diagnosis of PTSD. It was almost a year before a doctor said, ‘You’ve got PTSD. We’re going to start you on a program.”

The program was built upon a cocktail of prescribed drugs to help him sleep, to deal with depression and to tamp down his anxiety.

“At my worst point there were about six different drugs at one time and only ever seeing that if this wasn’t working there was another drug or an increase of a drug,” Starr said. “If I ever forgot these drugs, I would get a wicked withdrawal reminder and my quality of life was almost non-existent.”

That regimen, which also included one year of anger-management therapy, continued for years, during which Starr said he was twice denied a transfer to one of the military’s Joint Personnel Support Units, a military designation created as a way station for ill and injured personnel. He wanted to return to Vancouver — he and his then-girlfriend’s hometown — so that she could have family help with their two children while he dealt with his psychological problems.

Instead, Starr was kept at CFB Gagetown where he said that the heavy doses of sleeping pills he was prescribed caused him to be chronically late for work, testing the patience and eventually provoking the ire of his superior officers.

Those problems ended only in December 2012, when Starr was released from the military. He was judged “unsuitable for further service” — an item 5f release — because of personal problems “within his control” that had made him “an excessive administrative burden” to the military he had dreamed of joining ever since he was a boy.

Starr had lost his mental health, his family and now his career. Preparing for life as a civilian, he began looking for a new treatment. He examined psychedelic drugs like LSD and Ecstasy, which have been shown to have some benefit in PTSD therapies.

He finally settled on marijuana, which he at first had to purchase illegally off the street — a transaction that only heightened his anxiety because of the fear of unknown substances or arrest.

“Even that stuff did have a wonderful effect on me,” he said.

The marijuana was also a brake for Starr’s uncontrollable anger, which would be set off by the slightest provocations.

“The second that it touches my lungs it just washes out of me. It just goes away and I can’t describe it in any other way. It just melts off me,” he said.

Since early 2013, he has not touched any pharmaceutical drugs. He is still separated from his former girlfriend and not allowed to see his children — a painful consequence of his problems that he says he is working to repair.

But he now runs a property management company and works as a marijuana mentor for CannaConnect, a company that helps veterans obtain prescriptions and benefits for medical marijuana.

“My life will never be normal. I’ve come to terms with that,” he said. “But it’s as normal as I think it can be.”


http://www.metronews.ca/news/canada/2016/01/04/canadian-soldier-turns-to-pot-to-cope-with-ptsd.html
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2016, 16:20:06 »

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/01/04/pot-a-life-line-for-some-ailing-canadian-war-veterans.html

Pot a lifeline for some ailing Canadian war veterans

Medicinal marijuana has given former combat engineer Noah Starr control of the life that began falling apart when six of his fellow soldiers were killed in a 2007 IED strike in Afghanistan.




Former Canadian Forces member Noah Starr Starr had lost his mental health, his family and then his career. Preparing for life as a civilian, he began looking for a new treatment. He examined psychedelic drugs, which have shown some benefit in PTSD therapies. He finally settled on marijuana.   (James West for the Toronto Star) 

It took six deaths on Easter Sunday, 2007, for Noah Starr’s life to unravel.

It would take five years, thousands of pills, lost relationships and the discovery of medical marijuana before he won back some semblance of control.

“People call marijuana a gateway drug and it absolutely is. It’s been the gateway to my recovery,” said the former Canadian Armed Forces combat engineer from Fredericton, N.B.

“I’ve had times when I was in the hospital because I didn’t know where to turn. I have been one of those soldiers.”

Starr, now 31, can trace his troubles through the dust and dirt of Afghanistan to a road about 75 km west of Kandahar City. It was there on April 8, 2007, that an improvised explosive device exploded as a light armoured vehicle carrying Sgt. Donald Lucas of the 2nd Batallion of the Royal Canadian Regiment and the five other young men under his charge drove past.

Starr, whose job was to inspect Kandahar’s routes for roadside bombs, was working with another team a short distance away and was among the first to respond.

“It hit really close to home because I was wearing the exact same uniform that these guys were wearing. It made it very real for me and I think it put into perspective what could happen,” he said.

He kept coming back to the attack in his head. He chastised himself for feeling lucky that his friends had been switched out of the convoy at the last minute. The pictures of the dead men, the pictures of their families and the images of recently delivered Valentine’s Day cards etched themselves into Starr’s mind.

He put on a brave face, telling a Canadian reporter nearly two months later that, “I feel we are making an incredible difference. You know, just seeing kids on the street waving to us.”

But Starr was acutely aware he was suffering psychological problems and he told his superiors he needed help. Help, at that point in the Afghan mission, was a prescription for medication and access to a social worker to help him deal with his health needs while overseas. He trusted then that the military was equipped to help him deal with his difficulties.

It wasn’t until September 2007, when he returned to CFB Gagetown in New Brunswick and found there were only two psychiatrists available for the entire 2,000-member battle group that had just returned from war, that his confidence was rattled.

“It took me six months before I even saw a doctor,” he said. “It wasn’t until January of 2008 that I had a working diagnosis of PTSD. It was almost a year before a doctor said, ‘You’ve got PTSD. We’re going to start you on a program.”

The program was built upon a cocktail of prescribed drugs to help him sleep, to deal with depression and to tamp down his anxiety.

“At my worst point there were about six different drugs at one time and only ever seeing that if this wasn’t working there was another drug or an increase of a drug,” Starr said. “If I ever forgot these drugs, I would get a wicked withdrawal reminder and my quality of life was almost non-existent.”

That regimen, which also included one year of anger-management therapy, continued for years, during which Starr said he was twice denied a transfer to one of the military’s Joint Personnel Support Units, a military designation created as a way station for ill and injured personnel. He wanted to return to Vancouver — he and his then-girlfriend’s hometown — so that she could have family help with their two children while he dealt with his psychological problems.

Instead, Starr was kept at CFB Gagetown where he said that the heavy doses of sleeping pills he was prescribed caused him to be chronically late for work, testing the patience and eventually provoking the ire of his superior officers.

Those problems ended only in December 2012, when Starr was released from the military. He was judged “unsuitable for further service” — an item 5f release — because of personal problems “within his control” that had made him “an excessive administrative burden” to the military he had dreamed of joining ever since he was a boy.

Starr had lost his mental health, his family and now his career. Preparing for life as a civilian, he began looking for a new treatment. He examined psychedelic drugs like LSD and Ecstasy, which have been shown to have some benefit in PTSD therapies.

He finally settled on marijuana, which he at first had to purchase illegally off the street — a transaction that only heightened his anxiety because of the fear of unknown substances or arrest.

“Even that stuff did have a wonderful effect on me,” he said.

The marijuana was also a brake for Starr’s uncontrollable anger, which would be set off by the slightest provocations.

“The second that it touches my lungs it just washes out of me. It just goes away and I can’t describe it in any other way. It just melts off me,” he said.

Since early 2013, he has not touched any pharmaceutical drugs. He is still separated from his former girlfriend and not allowed to see his children — a painful consequence of his problems that he says he is working to repair.

But he now runs a property management company and works as a marijuana mentor for CannaConnect, a company that helps veterans obtain prescriptions and benefits for medical marijuana.

“My life will never be normal. I’ve come to terms with that,” he said. “But it’s as normal as I think it can be.”
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2016, 20:02:07 »
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2016, 21:16:39 »



Workout while High?




Power Plant Fitness is called the world’s first marijuana inspired gym. The concept of gym and weed is amazing. After a stressful day, there is nothing better than going to gym and getting high at the same time.

The owners believe that cannabis is good for focus and recovery. People from San Francisco will be able to get high and then carry on their workout. The company mentioned that the gym is not a place just to get high, its focused more on the athletic part.

I think sports will become one of the bigger pieces of the marijuana industry. It’s very much in line with the idea that people and society are starting to understand that marijuana is medicine. Marijuana, if you use it in a responsible way, accentuates the parts of sports that you love and helps you to do them better,” said McAlpine

All the members will take a cannabis performer assessment. This test will determine the best way for each people to use cannabis at gym. For some of them, a bite from a brownie will be the perfect boost to complete the workout, while others will feel too lazy to complete it. So, in order to achieve the wanted boost with cannabis, the coaches will figure out which is the best way to consume cannabis.

Because smoking weed in public is forbidden in San Francisco, the gym is based on edibles and vaping. The owner said that in the near future a smoking room will be added.

The company also develops a line of pre-workout edibles for focus and a post-workout for recovery.

Instead of selling their products online, the company is registered as a dispensary lounge under California laws.

This types of cooperatives allow the exchange of goods in public, by the medicinal cannabis patients and suppliers. But, they can not keep profits. The earning are used for the welfare of patients.

The gym’s purpose is to reverse the lazy stereotypes of pot users.
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Re: Medical Cannabis for Canadian Veterans
« Reply #24 on: June 04, 2016, 09:51:30 »

http://cannabisnowmagazine.com/cannabis/study-lifelong-marijuana-users-prove-healthy

Study Finds Lifelong Pot Users Are Healthy

By Mike Adams on June 3, 2016 @adamssoup


Long-term marijuana use does not seem to lead to a decline in overall physical health, though decades of smoking the sweet leaf could contribute to periodontal disease, a significant new study finds.

In a study of nearly 1,000 New Zealanders tracked over 40 years, people reporting nearly 20 years of consistent pot smoking did not show any signs of a decline in lung function, high blood pressure, diabetes, or any other deterioration of physical health.

In fact, the only negative consequence researchers say was present in heavy cannabis smokers as opposed to non-smokers was more gum disease.

“We can see the physical health effects of tobacco smoking in this study, but we don’t see similar effects for cannabis smoking,” said lead study author Madeline Meier, assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University.

This means while choosing to smoke marijuana as a preferred method of consumption may bring about some oral health problems over an extended period of time (researchers noticed this happening to people between the ages of 26 and 38) there is no evidence to suggest that smoking weed on a regular basis, even if that means decades of daily use, has the potential to sabotage one’s health in a similar manner to that of long-term use of tobacco.

“What we’re seeing is that cannabis may be harmful in some respects, but possibly not in every way,” says study co-author Avshalom Caspi, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University. “We need to recognize that heavy recreational cannabis use does have some adverse consequences, but overall damage to physical health is not apparent in this study.”

Interestingly, in countries that have legalized cannabis for medical purposes, some insurance companies have already begun to separate those who use marijuana from the same rank as their tobacco toking counterparts – classifying patients who smoke weed for therapeutic purposes as “non-smokers” – because research has shown marijuana and tobacco, while typically consumed through the same process, are actually very different when it comes to their individual effects on human health.

In a move that is being praised by medical marijuana patients all across Canada, BMO and Sun Life recently announced that they would no longer require cannabis users to select the “smokers” box on their respective life insurance questionnaires – a move that could save many of those participating in the northern nation’s medical marijuana program up to 50 percent on their insurance premiums.

“In our industry, we keep up to date with medical studies and companies update their underwriting guidelines accordingly,” Sun Life said in a statement. “As a result, people who use marijuana are now assessed … at non-smoker rates, unless they also use tobacco.”

Insurance experts say the insurers’ decision to no longer classify marijuana users as smokers is a sharp signal from the bowels of the corporate world that marijuana is, without a doubt, safer than tobacco. Otherwise, neither company would have dared take such a bold leap. After all, they are in the business of expanding the bottom line, not to make moral judgments or take any sort of political stance that could jeopardize the financial standings of shareholders.

    “What this tells me is that they have done their research, examined the evidence and concluded that the patterns of risk associated with typical marijuana use is much lower than that of typical tobacco use,” Paul Groontendorst, rector of the division of social and administrative pharmacy in the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto told reporters.

At the core of the entire debate surrounding whether marijuana is as dangerous as tobacco is a disease that is expected to kill around 595,690 people in the United States this year – cancer.

Last week, researchers at the University of Western Australia published an outlandish paper in the journal of Mutation Research that suggested people who smoke weed were altering their DNA in such a way that could cause their children to have cancer in the early years of their life. The study, overseen by Associate Professor Stuart Reece and Professor Gary Hulse from UWA’s School of Psychiatry and Clinical Sciences, said “Even if a mother has never used cannabis in her life, the mutations passed on by a father’s sperm can cause serious and fatal illnesses in their children.”

Come to find out, the researchers in the study never conducted any tests to arrive at this shocking conclusion – the entire basis for the research was a review of other studies. Cannabinoids experts quickly came out in opposition of the two scientist’s findings, arguing that their report was “based on a foundation of falsehoods.” Although previous research has concluded that other drugs, including tobacco and alcohol, have the potential to damage DNA, Dr. Ethan Russo, former Senior Medical Advisor for GW Pharmaceuticals said the smoking-weed-will-give-your-kids-cancer study is missing so many critical variables that it would be irresponsible to entertain their report as anything other than modern day reefer madness.

So, while there may be evidence smoking marijuana for decades is hard on your gums, it appears that even the habitual user can sleep soundly tonight knowing their longtime love affair with the herb is not likely to chisel their or anybody else’s tombstone.

Are you a habitual cannabis user? Tell us about your experiences.
Mike Adams is a contributing writer for Cannabis Now. You can follow him on Twitter @adamssoup.
I know that I’m not perfect and that I don’t claim to be, so before you point your fingers make sure your hands are clean.