Author Topic: Politics in 2017  (Read 31700 times)

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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #425 on: March 20, 2017, 19:08:47 »
Wrong angle.  Pain and suffering and failure to keep the Scots out.

Things have really changed,now the Scots want to stay home. :D

Offline GAP

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #426 on: March 20, 2017, 19:31:46 »
Things have really changed,now the Scots want to stay home. :D

I think they did then too......
Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I´m not so sure about the universe

Offline jollyjacktar

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #427 on: March 20, 2017, 19:50:48 »
Pic y, Pic y.

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #428 on: March 20, 2017, 22:50:39 »
Nothing left in Scotland but Irishmen with names like Connolly and Connery.

All the Scots left and became Prime Ministers in London (Cameron, Brown, Blair, Home...)  or set up opium shops in Hong Kong.
Over, Under, Around or Through.
Anticipating the triumph of Thomas Reid.

"One thing that being a scientist has taught me is that you can never be certain about anything. You never know the truth. You can only approach it and hope to get a bit nearer to it each time. You iterate towards the truth. You don’t know it.”  - James Lovelock

Conservative, n. A statesman who is enamored of existing evils, as distinguished from the Liberal, who wishes to replace them with others. [Ambrose Bierce, 1911]

Offline jmt18325

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #429 on: March 21, 2017, 13:24:14 »
Or they do and they disagree with it.  Thus they have expressed their democratic rights, of expression, as protected by Canadian law.

Of course - but there's nothing that can be done once they claim asylum.  We have to process their claim, no matter how they got here.  We signed the relevant treaties, after all.

Changing that is an entirely different discussion.

Offline jmt18325

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #430 on: March 21, 2017, 13:24:57 »
God, jmt!  I remain in continuing awe of your generally amazing superiority. 

I genuflect.  I genuflect. I genuflect.   [:D

I'm definitely superior to no one.  Just the other day, right on this website, I misunderstood the meaning of statist.

Offline jmt18325

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #431 on: March 21, 2017, 13:27:31 »
The interesting thing about law is that it can be changed. The law must balance between protecting the minority's rights while following the constitution (although I believe the constitution as a whole only covers Canadian citizens, with non-citizens being granted the rights laid out in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms) while ensuring that the majority's will is respected (as per democracy(.

Your absoluteness on every subject must be a real conversation starter at parties.

In real life, I'm much less absolute.  I don't disagree that the illegal border crossings are concerning (though they're being blown out of proportion).  I simply don't think that people generally understand the process.  Most people that I know don't even realize that those caught are arrested immediately.  Once they say the magic word, and if a criminal record is not found (generally not a problem in the case of those crossing) the must be released and their claim must be processed.

We should do away with the safe third country agreement.  Then people will stop sneaking in.  The Liberals won't budge on that, because they brought the agreement in.

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #432 on: March 21, 2017, 13:47:33 »
I'm definitely superior to no one.  Just the other day, right on this website, I misunderstood the meaning of statist.

 :cheers:
Over, Under, Around or Through.
Anticipating the triumph of Thomas Reid.

"One thing that being a scientist has taught me is that you can never be certain about anything. You never know the truth. You can only approach it and hope to get a bit nearer to it each time. You iterate towards the truth. You don’t know it.”  - James Lovelock

Conservative, n. A statesman who is enamored of existing evils, as distinguished from the Liberal, who wishes to replace them with others. [Ambrose Bierce, 1911]

Offline recceguy

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #433 on: March 21, 2017, 21:36:15 »
Nothing left in Scotland but Irishmen with names like Connolly and Connery.

All the Scots left and became Prime Ministers in London (Cameron, Brown, Blair, Home...)  or set up opium shops in Hong Kong.

They grow up on a cold, wet, always raining island. To make improvements, they move half way around the world.... To a cold, wet always raining island (Vancouver)  and become union executives.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 21:41:05 by recceguy »
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Op UNIFIER - CAF and the Ukraine Crisis
« Reply #434 on: March 27, 2017, 12:14:18 »
... That the Liberals continued their path (on Ukraine) in a situation that has remained largely the same should be a rare opportunity for them to show solidarity and applaud the government.
And in politics, it often seems that even if side x (be it Team Blue/Red/Orange/Beige/whatever)does what side y wants, it's either "too little, too late," "it's STILL not enough" or silence leading to criticism about the next thing y disagrees with.


- mod edit to clarify quote with yellow add -
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 09:30:07 by milnews.ca »
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Offline Flavus101

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Re: Re: Op UNIFIER - CAF and the Ukraine Crisis
« Reply #435 on: March 27, 2017, 16:15:48 »
The Romans ran into this problem where the politicians simply bickered to bicker without any just cause.

We know how well that turned out...

Historically, countries (or societies of people in general) have an interesting cycle where they are more democratic for a bit, then more authoritarian, back to more democratic and the wheel just keeps on spinning.

Offline jmt18325

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Re: Re: Op UNIFIER - CAF and the Ukraine Crisis
« Reply #436 on: March 27, 2017, 18:37:00 »
The Romans ran into this problem where the politicians simply bickered to bicker without any just cause.

We know how well that turned out...

Historically, countries (or societies of people in general) have an interesting cycle where they are more democratic for a bit, then more authoritarian, back to more democratic and the wheel just keeps on spinning.

In fairness, I think that our particular bickering issues is actually a design function of Westminster Parliamentary Democracy.

Offline Flavus101

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Re: Re: Op UNIFIER - CAF and the Ukraine Crisis
« Reply #437 on: March 27, 2017, 21:21:31 »
I sometimes watch Question Period (I know, I really must have nothing to do  :P) and you will find members of both sides continuously making a loud raucous that prevents the other side from speaking thus requiring the Speaker of the House to shush them like children. Or you have the pointless snide comments that are only made to try and improve the ego of the individual saying them.

I agree that there must be a back and forth, otherwise you will never be able to reach a compromise. I do not believe that our back and forth in it's current form is very useful nor does it provide anything of actual import the majority of the time. Perhaps removing the Friday sitting and the subsequent cut in pay (yes I know that the MP's will still "technically" be working but it is nice to dream) would be beneficial.

Offline jmt18325

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Re: Re: Op UNIFIER - CAF and the Ukraine Crisis
« Reply #438 on: Yesterday at 09:18:10 »
I sometimes watch Question Period (I know, I really must have nothing to do  :P) and you will find members of both sides continuously making a loud raucous that prevents the other side from speaking thus requiring the Speaker of the House to shush them like children. Or you have the pointless snide comments that are only made to try and improve the ego of the individual saying them.

For a time, the Liberals didn't under Trudeau, as they said they wanted to do Parliament better.  The media has reported that lately, in the last couple of months, that has been returning to the governing side of the bench as well (I can't remember where I read that in the last two weeks or so).

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Re: Op UNIFIER - CAF and the Ukraine Crisis
« Reply #439 on: Yesterday at 10:46:09 »
I sometimes watch Question Period (I know, I really must have nothing to do  :P) and you will find members of both sides continuously making a loud raucous that prevents the other side from speaking thus requiring the Speaker of the House to shush them like children. Or you have the pointless snide comments that are only made to try and improve the ego of the individual saying them.

I agree that there must be a back and forth, otherwise you will never be able to reach a compromise. I do not believe that our back and forth in it's current form is very useful nor does it provide anything of actual import the majority of the time. Perhaps removing the Friday sitting and the subsequent cut in pay (yes I know that the MP's will still "technically" be working but it is nice to dream) would be beneficial.

Someone here wisely pointed out it's called Question period, not Answer period (or was that Question and Answer period?).  I've seen it a few times and thought it was a complete joke. It reminds me of reality TV where the point is to one-up each other and get cheers from your side.

Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Canadian Politics
« Reply #440 on: Yesterday at 13:14:57 »
Someone here wisely pointed out it's called Question period, not Answer period (or was that Question and Answer period?).  I've seen it a few times and thought it was a complete joke. It reminds me of reality TV where the point is to one-up each other and get cheers from your side.
And I hear that even though government folk write up decent, whazzup answers to possible questions that can come up (when there is a firm answer to be had, anyway) during Oral Questions (the official term), many Ministers aren't willing to go with the DS solution, with many going, as you say, for the political zinger instead.
“Most great military blunders stem from the good intentions of some high-ranking buffoon ...” – George MacDonald Fraser, "The Sheik and the Dustbin"

The words I share here are my own, not those of anyone else or anybody I may be affiliated with.

Tony Prudori
MILNEWS.ca - Twitter