Author Topic: Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis  (Read 1616 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DMARS

  • Guest
  • *
  • 20
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1
Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis
« on: January 14, 2017, 05:46:10 »
I was released in 2014 with PTSD and have recently been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.  My VAC worker advised me to put in a claim for the MS.  Curious if anyone has any experience with how to word the "Applicant Statement" portion of the form, relating the diagnosis to military service.  I served just under 10 years in the Navy and was part of the anti-piracy tour in 09, and on Roto 2-10 with CANSOF.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Offline medicineman

  • Well stuck into my new job and thoroughly enjoying it.
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 131,690
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,593
  • In Arduis Fidelis
    • Fed By The Firehose
Re: Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2017, 10:58:02 »
As a medical person, I find it interesting someone would tell you to blame a disorder on military service where the highest risk factor of developing it is essentially living in Canada (or any other northern hemispheric country for that matter).  I guess if you apply, the worst they can do is say "No".  You might be able to get a better angle if you served on submarines, as it's thought that the risk increases due to decreased sunlight/Vitamin D levels we get due to short winter days and inability to get large enough muscle group exposure to sunlight due to cold.

Good luck and sorry to hear about the diagnosis.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Online ModlrMike

    : Riding time again... woohooo!

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 196,369
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,407
    • Canadian Association of Physician Assistants
Re: Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2017, 20:20:09 »
I'm going to have to agree with medicineman here. The prevailing opinion on the possible causes of MS remain:

1. Genetic - fair hair and skin typical of Nordic descent (although Richard Pryor and Montel Williams prove the exception);
2. Immunologic - it is unknown what the precise mechanism is that causes the immune system to attack myelin;
3. Environmental - those who live in northern latitudes or have decreased Vit D stores seem more at risk; and
4. Infectious - research continues into measles, HHV-6, and EBV as potential triggers.

The most advanced of these theories being the genetic component. There are two basic forms of MS; progressive, and remitting-relapsing. There is unfortunately no current cure for the disease, despite what the CCVSI adherents would say.

Please do not let the foregoing dissuade you from submitting your claim. I wish you luck, and hope that you fare well.

« Last Edit: January 14, 2017, 21:53:31 by Loachman »
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats. (H.L. Mencken 1919)
Zero tolerance is the politics of the lazy. All it requires is that you do nothing and ban everything.

Offline recceguy

    A Usual Suspect.

  • At the core of liberalism is the spoiled child – miserable, as all spoiled children are, unsatisfied, demanding, ill-disciplined, despotic and useless. Liberalism is a philosophy of sniveling brats. -P.J. O’Rouke-
  • Directing Staff
  • Army.ca Myth
  • *
  • 239,947
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 17,488
  • doddering docent to the museum of misanthropy
    • Army.ca
Re: Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2017, 00:59:10 »
A friend of mine has it. Diagnosed in Afghanistan. They are pensioned out for it and taken care of by VAC.
“I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind.”

John G. Diefenbaker

Offline medicineman

  • Well stuck into my new job and thoroughly enjoying it.
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 131,690
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,593
  • In Arduis Fidelis
    • Fed By The Firehose
Re: Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2017, 10:24:34 »
A friend of mine has it. Diagnosed in Afghanistan. They are pensioned out for it and taken care of by VAC.

Everything changes when the diagnosis is made in a Special Duty Area, as the assumption (even if it really is in error) is that it was due to military service in a bad place with bad things and people around you.  Though I'm exaggerating just a little, based on some cases I've seen, I could likely get a VAC pension for sunburn incurred in a few places since we didn't have proper head gear, mosquito bites, etc.  Coworker of mine got a VAC pension for his reflux disease - something that had everything to do with their pack of cigarettes/day and 3 pot of coffee a day habits - because they were formally diagnosed in Bosnia.  IMO, this dude needs to tie the diagnosis to an SDA in order to have a good case.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline Blackadder1916

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 113,915
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,430
Re: Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2017, 15:29:53 »
A friend of mine has it. Diagnosed in Afghanistan. They are pensioned out for it and taken care of by VAC.

Further to Medicineman.  It is the "Insurance Principle".

http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/about-us/policy/document/1447
Quote
Insurance Principle: As stipulated by paragraphs 21(1)(a) and 21(1)(b) of the Pension Act and subsections 2(1) and 45(1) of the Canadian Forces Members and Veterans Re-establishment and Compensation Act, a member is eligible for a disability pension/award for a disability or death resulting from injury or illness which was incurred during, attributable to, or aggravated during Wartime Service or Special Duty Service. This eligibility is referred to as the Insurance Principle, as individuals are covered 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and only need to demonstrate that their disability had its onset during the qualifying period of service. Unlike the Compensation Principle, no causal link needs to be established between the disability and military service.

There are more details as to "where and when" the Insurance Principle applies in the linked document.  I've known (and worked with) a few who've been the beneficiary of ensuring that even minor aches, pains and complaints were documented by medical authorities when they were in SDAs.
Whisky for the gentlemen that like it. And for the gentlemen that don't like it - Whisky.