Author Topic: Mexico Drug War and Instability  (Read 66086 times)

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Offline Yrys

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Re: Collapse of Mexico
« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2009, 17:28:13 »
Charges over Mexico nursery fire

Prosecutors in Mexico have arrested seven regional officials over the deaths
of 47 children in a fire at a day-care centre earlier this month. The attorney
general of northern Sonora state said the officials, from the state's finance
department, were being charged with negligent homicide. The department
was in charge of the operations at a warehouse next to the nursery, where
the fire started.

Investigators found no fire alarms or extinguishers in the warehouse. The
property was used to store cars, tyres and paperwork for the state.

Sonora State Attorney General Abel Murrieta said arrest warrants had been
issued for six other Finance Department officials. "They are employees and
officials with the Finance Department who have a direct responsibility for the
warehouse where the fire started," he told a news conference.

Investigators said the fire may have been caused by a short circuit or over-
heating in the warehouse air conditioning system. The blaze spread to the
roof of the day care centre and fire fighters had to knock holes in the walls
of the building to rescue children.

Thirty children died on the day of the 5 June fire in Hermosillo and many more
were badly injured. The 47th victim, a three-year-old girl with burns on 65% of
her body, died on Sunday.
Louvre website

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Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Collapse of Mexico
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2009, 13:15:46 »
Yikes.

Quote
Mexico's drug conflict intensifies - 20 Sep 09
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaNdpma8duM&feature=channel
The Mexico-US border has become a battleground in the war on drug cartels.

Traffickers criss-cross the river that marks the border in a cat and mouse game with authorities on both sides.

Al Jazeera's Mariana Sanchez spent the day with US police patrolling the area to see just how well organised the cartels have become.

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Offline muskrat89

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Re: Collapse of Mexico
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2009, 13:33:19 »
People who live in the southern border states see this stuff (and related activity) every day. Home invasions, gun battles, drop houses, ransoms, and more. Phoenix is Number 2 in the world for kidnappings - behind only Mexico City. I think AZ is close to leading the nation in vehicle thefts. Invariably they find them trashed near the border - used to transport people or dope.
The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Collapse of Mexico
« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2009, 19:17:25 »
Another factor that affects the Mexican military's ability to stabilize the country?

Quote
17/09/2009
Mexico.- During the Calderon administration military desertion has decreased 39.88 percent compared to that documented in the Fox administration, this according to a report provided by the Secretariat of National Defense that was given to the senate.

It is stated that the reason for this is the increase of benefits for the military troops that has raised their quality of life.


''The objective of President Calderon was to reinforce the morale among the Army and Air Force troops, between the period of September 1st 2008 and August 31st 2009 there were only 5912 cases of desertion making a total of 30233 desertions in this administration to this date. Numbers that represent a decrease of 39.88 compared to the same period of the previous administration,'' informs the Secretariat of National Defense.

Among the measures to improve the quality of life of the troops the report said that 20 percent of the 2009 budget was destined for personal services.

More than 40 million pesos were also assigned for death and burial compensations and 410 million pesos for life and institutional insurance.

http://www.milenio.com/node/286800
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Offline time expired

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Re: Collapse of Mexico
« Reply #29 on: September 21, 2009, 15:31:20 »
All this and not a word about the financial supporters of all this
mayhem,the user,the Hollywood stars,sporting hero's, politicians,
businessmen and all the other users of this coolest of all drugs,
cocaine.Some people still refer to drug use as  a victimless crime
I beg to differ,every dollar spent on drugs goes to support the
murdering swine who organize this evil trade.
Maybe we should make an agreement with the Mexicans that our
convicted drug users spend some time in Mexican jails as they are
responsible for Mexico`s missfortunes.
                                            Regards
nothing is better for the morale of the troops
as occasionally to see a dead general
               field marshal slim

Offline S.M.A.

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Mexican Navy kills top drug cartel kingpin
« Reply #30 on: December 17, 2009, 02:10:46 »
Some good news for once on an otherwise bleak-sounding thread.

Quote
Two hundred sailors raided an upscale apartment complex and killed one of Mexico's top kingpins in a two-hour gunbattle Wednesday, one of the biggest victories yet in President Felipe Calderon's drug war.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091217/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Collapse of Mexico
« Reply #31 on: December 17, 2009, 22:25:51 »
They were Mexican Marines. :christmas happy:
Probably FES. Good job. Taking Mexico back one drug lord at a time.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2009, 22:48:34 by tomahawk6 »

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2009, 23:10:25 »


Mexican navy sailors stand guard in a vehicle during an operation in Cuernavaca, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009. A Mexican navy official said alleged drug cartel chief Arturo Beltran Leyva was killed in a shootout with sailors Wednesday. Two hundred sailors raided an upscale apartment complex and killed a reputed Mexican drug cartel chief in a two-hour gunbattle, one of the biggest victories yet in President Felipe Calderon's drug war.  (AP Photo/OEM, Froylan Trujillo)



Mexican navy sailors arrive during an operation in Cuernavaca, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009. A Mexican navy official said alleged drug cartel chief Arturo Beltran Leyva was killed in a shootout with sailors Wednesday. Two hundred sailors raided an upscale apartment complex and killed a reputed Mexican drug cartel chief in a two-hour gunbattle, one of the biggest victories yet in President Felipe Calderon's drug war. (AP Photo/OEM, Froylan Trujillo)



Mexican navy sailors take cover during an operation in Cuernavaca, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009. A Mexican navy official said alleged drug cartel chief Arturo Beltran Leyva was killed in a shootout with sailors Wednesday. Two hundred sailors raided an upscale apartment complex and killed a reputed Mexican drug cartel chief in a two-hour gunbattle, one of the biggest victories yet in President Felipe Calderon's drug war. (AP Photo/OEM, Froylan Trujillo)



Soldiers arrive near an apartment complex in Cuernavaca, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009. A Mexican navy official said alleged drug cartel chief Arturo Beltran Leyva was killed in a shootout with sailors Wednesday. Two hundred sailors raided an upscale apartment complex and killed one of Mexico's top kingpins in a two-hour gunbattle Wednesday, one of the biggest victories yet in President Felipe Calderon's drug war. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)



Soldiers stand guard near an apartment complex in Cuernavaca, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009. A Mexican navy official said alleged drug cartel chief Arturo Beltran Leyva was killed in a shootout with sailors Wednesday. Two hundred sailors raided an upscale apartment complex and killed one of Mexico's top kingpins in a two-hour gunbattle Wednesday, one of the biggest victories yet in President Felipe Calderon's drug war. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)



Soldiers arrive near an apartment complex in Cuernavaca, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2009. A Mexican navy official said alleged drug cartel chief Arturo Beltran Leyva was killed in a shootout with sailors Wednesday. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)



Navy special forces stand guard during a navy operation in Cuernavaca, in the Mexican state of Morelos December 16, 2009. Arturo Beltran Leyva, one of Mexico's most wanted drug traffickers, was killed in a shoot out with state security forces during the same operation on Wednesday, the navy said.
REUTERS/Margarito Perez (MEXICO - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW SOCIETY)



Mexican soldiers detain an unidentified man during a navy operation in Cuernavaca, in the Mexican state of Morelos December 16, 2009. Arturo Beltran Leyva, one of Mexico's most wanted drug traffickers, was killed in a shoot out with state security forces during the same operation on Wednesday, the navy said. QUALITY FROM SOURCE REUTERS/Margarito Perez



Mexican soldiers detain an unidentified man during a navy operation in Cuernavaca, in the Mexican state of Morelos December 16, 2009. Arturo Beltran Leyva, one of Mexico's most wanted drug traffickers, was killed in a shoot out with state security forces during the same operation on Wednesday, the navy said. REUTERS/Margarito Perez
Our Country
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2009, 20:00:26 »

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #34 on: December 22, 2009, 14:54:04 »
The cartels/kingpins exacting their revenge against the Mexican Navy's Marines for taking one of their own.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091222/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico

Quote
MEXICO CITY – Gunmen mowed down the family of a Mexican marine just hours after the military honored him as a national hero for losing his life during a raid that took down powerful drug kingpin Arturo Beltran Leyva.

(...)

Angulo and Beltran Leyva were both killed during a shootout last week between marines and the cartel at an apartment complex in the colonial city of Cuernavaca, south of Mexico City.

(...)
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #35 on: December 22, 2009, 17:34:44 »
The cartels/kingpins exacting their revenge against the Mexican Navy's Marines for taking one of their own.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091222/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_drug_war_mexico

Time for the Mexican government to hoist the Red Flag and start playing El Deguello -  no mercy, no prisoners, a fight to the end.
Years ago, fairy tales all began with, "Once upon a time." Now we know they all began with, "If I'm elected."

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Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #36 on: January 02, 2010, 23:47:05 »
Wow. Another victory for the Mexican authorities.

From the Associated Press via Yahoo News

Quote
MEXICO CITY – Mexican police have captured alleged drug lord Carlos Beltran Leyva, just two week after his even more powerful brother was killed in a shootout with troops — back-to-back victories in President Felipe Calderon's drug war.

The Public Safety office said in a statement Saturday night that Carlos Beltran Leyva was arrested in Culiacan, the capital of the Pacific coast state of Sinaloa, where he and several of his brothers were born and allegedly started their gang
.


Two weeks ago, his brother Arturo, reputed chief of the Beltran Leyva Cartel, was killed in a shootout with Mexican marines in the central city of Cuernavaca.

Mexican officials in the past have described Carlos Beltran as a key member of the gang, but it was unclear if he took over as chief of the cartel after his brother died. A third brother, Alfredo Beltran Levya, was arrested in January 2008

Another brother, Mario Beltran Leyva, is still at large
and listed as one of Mexico's most wanted alleged drug lords.
(...)
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Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #37 on: January 22, 2010, 02:48:53 »


Mexican Federal Police present Teodoro Garcia Simental, known as "El Teo" or "Tres Letras" (L) and Diego Raimundo Guerrero, members of Tijuana cartels, in Mexico City January 12, 2010. Mexican police on Tuesday captured Garcia Simental, a drug kingpin known for having the corpses of tortured rivals dissolved in acid and blamed for much of a surge in violence in the northern border city of Tijuana, police said.
REUTERS/Eliana Aponte



Eduardo Teodoro Garcia Simental, a.k.a "El Teo", one of Mexico's most-wanted drug lords with possible connections to the Arellano Felix brothers or Tijuana cartels, is escorted by police officers in Mexico City. Garcia was captured early on January 12, 2010 in the northwestern state of Baja California Sur, Mexico, along with one of his brothers known as 'El Torito'. (AFP/Alfredo Estrella)



A soldier stands inside a raided pawn shop while under investigation for money laundering in Tijuana November 25, 2009. Often overlooked amid all the violence and chaos they engender is the fact that Mexico's drug cartels are capably run businesses that have turned into some of the most lucrative criminal enterprises ever. Picture taken November 25, 2009. To match SPECIAL REPORT - DRUGS/MEXICO- REUTERS/Jorge Duenes



Mexican soldiers stand at a check point in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2010. The Mexican government stepped up its fight against drug cartels, sending 860 more soldiers to Tijuana where violence has risen in recent months.
(AP Photo/Guillermo Arias)



Soldiers stand on guard at a check point in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2010. The Mexican government stepped up its fight against drug cartels, sending 860 more soldiers to Tijuana border city where violence has been rising in recent months. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias)



Alleged gunmen and kidnappers are displayed to the media in front of seized guns and drugs in Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010. According to the army, the suspects were arrested on Monday during an operation in a house where soldiers seized the guns, the drugs and also found an unidentified dead body.
(AP Photo/Guillermo Arias)
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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Offline Sprinting Thistle

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2010, 22:21:57 »
There is bigger problem here that goes frequently unreported.  Trans-national terrorists and trans national criminal enterprises are working together, sharing TTPs, using each others networks and contacts to support their own activities.  In South America, Hezbollah and AQ have been working in the Tri Border Area (TBA) generating a support base and raising funds; all facilitated by narco-terrorists.  The TBA is an ungoverned area much like the FATAs of Pakistan.  Mexico becomes a gateway into North America, not just for drugs, illegals, but also terrorists, all using and sharing the same methods.

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #39 on: March 25, 2010, 23:15:44 »
Good news for Mexico:

Associated Press link
Quote
MEXICO CITY – Federal police have arrested Mexico's "King of Heroin," a powerful drug trafficker allegedly responsible for running thousands of pounds of heroin into Southern California each year, authorities said Thursday.

Jose Antonio Medina, nicknamed "Don Pepe," was arrested in the western state of Michoacan on Wednesday and is being held for prosecution, said Ramon Pequeno, head of the anti-narcotics division of Mexico's federal police.

Medina, 36, ran a complex smuggling operation that hauled 440 pounds (200 kilograms) of heroin each month across the Mexican border in Tijuana for La Familia drug cartel, Pequeno said.

The White House National Drug Threat Assessment says that while heroin use is stable or decreasing in the U.S., the source of the drug has shifted in recent years from Colombia — where production and purity are declining — to Mexico, where powerful drug cartels are gaining a foothold in the lucrative market.


Heroin production in Mexico rose from 17 pure metric tons in 2007 to 38 tons in 2008, with the increase translating to lower heroin prices and more heroin-related overdoses and more overdose deaths, according to U.S. government estimates in a report by the National Drug Intelligence Center.

Border Patrol agents seized 4.8 million pounds of narcotics at border crossings last year, and heroin seizures saw the most significant increase during that time, with a 316 percent jump over 2008.

Mexico and the U.S. are working together to counter a handful of increasingly violent drug cartels that supply most of the illicit drugs sold in the U.S. The arrest came the day after top U.S. Cabinet officials, led by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, visited Mexico to underscore their shared responsibility for the country's drug-related violence.

Nearly 17,900 people have died in drug-related violence since President Felipe Calderon launched an assault on cartels after taking office in December 2006.

(...)
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Offline S.M.A.

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18 gunmen killed in attacks on Mexican Army bases
« Reply #40 on: April 01, 2010, 03:06:12 »
With these latest attacks, the drug lords seemed to have taken the war right into the Mexican Army's bases.

Associated Press link

Quote
VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico – Dozens of gunmen mounted rare and apparently coordinated attacks targeting two army garrisons in northern Mexico, touching off firefights that killed 18 attackers.

The attempts to blockade soldiers inside their bases — part of seven near-simultaneous attacks across two northern states — appeared to mark a serious escalation in Mexico's drug war, in which cartel gunmen attacked in unit-size forces armed with bulletproof vehicles, dozens of hand grenades and assault rifles.

While drug gunmen frequently shoot at soldiers on patrol, they seldom target army bases
, and even more rarely attack in the force displayed during the confrontations Tuesday in the border states of Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon — areas that have seen a surge of bloodshed in recent months.

The violence mainly involves a fight between the Gulf cartel and its former allies, the Zetas, a gang of hit men. The cartel — which has apparently formed an alliance with other cartels seeking to exterminate the Zetas — has been warning people in the region with a series of banners and e-mails that the conflict would get worse over the next two to three months.
(...)
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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #42 on: April 24, 2010, 10:06:19 »
Arizona has just passed the most stringent anti-illegal immigrant law in the country. Lots of court challenges stacking up already.

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2010/04/23/20100423arizona-immigration-law-passed.html

Gov Brewer :
Quote
Brewer said that she listened patiently to supporters and opponents and that, although "many people disagree, I firmly believe it represents what's best for Arizona." She criticized the federal government for a lack of action to secure the border, and she said her signature provided "security within our borders."

"We cannot sacrifice our safety to the murderous greed of drug cartels," Brewer said. "We cannot stand idly by as drophouses, kidnappings and violence compromise our quality of life."
The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #43 on: May 27, 2010, 19:32:33 »
Quote
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Gunmen ambushed army troops inspecting flood-risk zones in a northern Mexican border city, killing one soldier and wounding another, authorities said Thursday.

Three gunmen in a car opened fire on the military patrol Wednesday in Piedras Negras, a city across the border from Eagle Pass, Texas, the Defense Department said in a statement. The soldiers had been inspecting neighborhoods to prepare for floods after several days of heavy rains
.

One soldier was killed and another was wounded in ensuing battle.

Officials said soldiers arrested the gunmen and seized 12 guns, including 10 assault rifles, ammunition and bulletproof vests from the assailants — an arsenal typical of Mexico's brutal drug cartels.

The statement did not say if the gunmen were affiliated with any particular gang.

Soldiers have increasingly come under attack in northeastern Mexico, where the Gulf cartel is battling its former ally, the Zetas gang of hit men.

Mexican and U.S. officials said the Gulf cartel has aligned itself with the Sinaloa and La Familia gangs to wipe out the Zetas in the region.

Meanwhile, the Defense Department said a member of the Arturo Beltran Leyva cartel was killed in a separate battle with soldiers Wednesday in the northern city of Monterrey.

The agency identified the man as Sergio Adrian Martinez, a former state police officer who was allegedly the leader of the Beltran Leyva cartel in San Pedro Garza Garcia, a wealthy suburb of Monterrey.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 19:45:14 by CougarDaddy »
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Offline sean m

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2010, 21:23:18 »
The only way to stop the violence is to stop the cocaine flow, this comes from Bolivia and Colombia, there you would need to provide the farmers with an alternate crop to grow which is lucrative. Improve the socio economic conditions of these people. Eliminate the coroption there. Easier said then done. The mexican cartels also specialize in marijuana growing, governments need to legalize this drug in order to stop organized crime from profiting. Again easier said than done, this has to be a continental movement.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #45 on: May 27, 2010, 21:52:22 »
If you find a crop for those farmers that is more lucrative than cocaine you could find yourself with a Nobel prize.  It would be far better to fire more money into rehabilitation services here where the demand for the drugs come from.  If there's no one to buy the cocaine, Cartels lose the income.  They aren't in it for the enjoyment, they are in it for the billions of dollars it generates.

Edited because I fail at English.  :crybaby:
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Offline sean m

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #46 on: May 27, 2010, 22:28:11 »

Um this people live in absolute garbage, they have absolutely nothing, they are at the bottom of the  bottom. I think that all these people want is to live a good life, the same as most people here, with decent money coming in. Obviously there are not in it for the enjoyment, I doubt that growing something as a farme; you dont make much profit anyway, you have the chance of being killed and/or arrested, I doubt that you would enjoy it. You say pay for rehab, that is taking care of one problem but not at the source. You can spend all you want on rehab clinics, there will constantly be people buying cocaine it is probably the biggest selling drug in north america. You are gonna waste millions of not billions on this, arrest the drug dealers wont work either or the suppliers, there will always be money to made and people will always be dealing drugs. You fill up the prisons which creates over crowding, even more anger, lack of opportunity etc etc. There are natural good out there whose industries are in the billions ex. coffee and tobacco. If only the titans in the industry would give a damn about the cultivators producing the crop and giving them much better salaries and insurance, I am almost 100% certain the farmers would choose this.

If you find a crop for those farmers that is more lucrative than cocaine you could find yourself with a Nobel prize.  It would be far better to fire more money into rehabilitation services here where the demand for the drugs come from.  If there's no one to buy the cocaine, Cartels lose the income.  They aren't in it for the enjoyment, they are in it for the billions of dollars it generates.

Edited because I fail at English.  :crybaby:

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #47 on: August 31, 2010, 20:22:29 »




Federal police officers stand in formation after their arrival at Mariano Escobedo international airport in Apodaca, neighbouring Monterrey August 26, 2010. About 150 police officers arrived on Thursday to take part in an operation to curb drug-related violence, according to local media. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo




In this image released by Mexico's Public Safety Department on Monday Aug. 30, 2010, Edgar Valdez Villarreal, alias 'the Barbie,'' is escorted by police officers in the state of Mexico, which borders the capital, Mexico City. Federal police on Monday, Aug. 30, 2010, captured Valdez Villarreal, a Texas-born alleged drug kingpin, who faces trafficking charges in the U.S. and has been blamed for a vicious turf war that has included bodies hung from bridges and shootouts in central Mexico.
(AP Photo/Mexico's Public Safety Department)

Agence-France-Presse link

Quote
Army clashes with drug gangs in eastern Mexico: seven dead

55 minutes ago
 

VERACRUZ, Mexico (AFP) - At least seven people have been killed in clashes between Mexican soldiers and likely drug gangs not far from where 72 migrants were massacred last week, the military said Monday.
 
The clashes began Sunday night in the city of Panuco, bordering northeastern Tamaulipas state which has seen a recent eruption of violence, including explosives attacks and the murder of a mayor in recent days.


Six suspects and one soldier were killed and five soldiers were wounded, the statement said.



The soldiers were attacked with fragmentation grenades and guns when they arrived at an alleged safe house used by drug gangs following a tip-off, the statement said.


The shootout lasted through the night, and skirmishes were also reported elsewhere in the city, which is in Veracruz state.


Six people were detained, as well as several weapons including 11 AK-47s, the army said.

Blame for the massacre of 72 Central and South American migrants last week fell on the ruthless Zetas drug gang set up by former elite soldiers...

(...)
Our Country
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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Offline Thucydides

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #48 on: January 03, 2011, 08:52:47 »
The entire Mexican State is unraveling, which has far more serious security implications for us than any number of "peacekeeping" or stability adventures in Africa of central Asia:

 http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/failed-state-watch-how-much-longer-for-mexico-part-one/

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Failed State Watch: How Much Longer for Mexico? (Part One)

Posted By Alberto de la Cruz On January 3, 2011 @ 12:00 am In Crime,Homeland Security,Immigration,Latin America,US News,Uncategorized,World News | 7 Comments

For years now, the drug war raging between the well-armed Mexican drug cartels and the Mexican government has been well documented by the international press. And with that war now spilling into American cities located near the Mexican border, news agencies here are paying more attention to the escalating violence. But while there has been no shortage of reportage on the drug war, few reporters are investigating the rampant corruption within the Mexican government itself that has facilitated the spread and growth of that drug trade — and in many cases has participated in it.

Today, as Mexican drug cartels become more emboldened and lawlessness spreads throughout the country, the Mexican government is struggling to maintain control. One by one, cities within Mexico are being taken over by drug lords and criminal kingpins, as mayors, police chiefs, and police officers are either bought or assassinated by the cartel leaders.

During his campaign for president in 2006, Mexican President Felix Calderon vowed to go after the drug cartels and to reduce drastically the drug-related crime wave that besieged the nation. However, what President Calderon apparently did not take into consideration when making this campaign promise was the rampant corruption within the government itself, from its judicial system to law enforcement, which has allowed this unprecedented growth in power and influence by the Mexican drug lords.

Only four short years ago, it seems Felipe Calderon had no idea how insidious the corruption had become. In a leaked diplomatic cable from the U.S. embassy in Madrid, a conversation in 2007 between the Mexican president and the visiting former Spanish President Jose Maria Aznar reveals that Calderon had admitted that the Mexican government had completely miscalculated the corruption in Mexico and the influence wielded by the drug cartels:

    Aznar had just completed a trip to Mexico and believes that President Calderon is doing a “credible job.” Aznar said Calderon admitted to having completely misjudged the depth and breadth of corruption in Mexico and that the pervasive influence of narcotics in the country was beyond comprehension.

The “credible job” Aznar referred to is debatable when you consider that three years later the drug war in Mexico has only gotten worse, and the corruption that has permeated the Mexican government has grown and continues to provide aid and shelter to the criminal rings that operate virtually unchallenged within the country. It is estimated that 90% of the cocaine that is brought into the U.S. comes through Mexico, and while close to 40,000 Mexicans have been killed by drug violence in the past four years, only 2% of the crimes committed are ever punished. This gives the drug lords an immense advantage not only over the Mexican president, but over the Mexican population as well, which is powerless to combat the violence.

What hope for a normal and safe existence can a law-abiding Mexican have when he or she knows that for every 100 of their fellow countrymen beaten, raped, or murdered, only two will see justice prevail?

Even when the Mexican government manages to capture one of the capos, as they refer to the drug kingpins, too often these ringleaders go free due to lack of evidence, legal errors, or unlawful actions committed by government law enforcement officials during their investigations. Blog del Narco (www.blogdelnarco.com [1]), a popular Mexico based blog run by two anonymous bloggers reporting on the drug-related violence happening throughout the country, reported recently on five high-profile cases of captured capos who ended up going free:

    Whenever the federal government captures a capo they display them like collected trophies, going as far as showing them on national television. However, when the time comes to prove their guilt to judges, all the sub-secretary of the Organized Crime Special Investigations department (SIEDO) collects is defeats.

    Five cases of accused high-profile drug traffickers, some included in government television spots, have been thrown out by the judicial authorities this past year for lack of evidence, omissions or errors in the case files, or for illegal actions undertaken by the investigative authorities.

As the violence increases and the drug lords gain control of more cities, the Mexican government finds itself struggling to defeat an enemy that seems to grow stronger with each passing day. This reality calls into the question the stability of the country itself: how much longer can the government of Mexico continue to hold power while it continues to lose control?

A nation sharing a border with the U.S. descending into anarchy is a frightful thought for Americans, and the obvious implications of such an event should be causing concern throughout the halls of the White House and the State Department. To complicate matters further, consider that Mexico is home to over 112,000,000 people and is an important trading partner to the U.S. And in spite of the corruption and mismanagement, the country is one of the world’s top producers of petroleum with an impressive trillion-dollar economy. A collapse of the government there would not only cause a security threat on our southern border, it would also send harmful shockwaves through the American economy and the world economy as well. And that would only be the beginning.

The corruption within Mexico does not only manifest itself in the drug trade, it is apparent in society as well. With its trillion-dollar economy and petroleum production, Mexico still manages to have 47% of its population living below the poverty line according to 2008 figures. This makes the narcotics trade not only a viable and acceptable option for many Mexicans, but in some cases an unavoidable one.

Nothing illustrates the societal shift away from the rule of law that appears to be taking place south of the border better than the latest trend among Mexican children. Instead of emulating superheroes and sports stars during playtime, children are now emulating drug cartel assassins.

In another report from Blog del Narco, we learn that Mexican children have given up playing typical children’s games such as soccer, and have traded in their soccer balls for toy weapons in order to play “assassins”:

    It may seem incredible to some that the children no longer play soccer on the streets as before. Now they pretend to be assassins. They form teams, just as before, but now they arm their mini commando units to engage in imaginary battles that perhaps in the future will be their reality.

    The girls too form part of this game, leaving their dolls to the side to turn themselves into assassins. Some are even the commanders in these play groups of children.

The situation with the Mexican children has gotten so out of hand that parents have begun prohibiting their children from having plastic guns and weapons. Even the Mexican government’s consumer protection agency, PROFECO, launched a campaign during the Christmas season exhorting retailers to remove plastic guns, rifles, and machine guns from their toy shelves.

The drug war taking place in Mexico deserves the coverage it has received, but the corruption within the Mexican government and its inability to effectively combat the drug cartels merits as much or more of that coverage. It is a deadly combination that threatens to destabilize a nation with 112 million inhabitants to the point of anarchy. A nation bordering the U.S. with an out-of-control drug war is a serious threat. A nation bordering the U.S. in a state of anarchy, with the only authority being well-funded and well-armed drug kingpins, is a clear and present danger.

Article printed from Pajamas Media: http://pajamasmedia.com

URL to article: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/failed-state-watch-how-much-longer-for-mexico-part-one/

URLs in this post:

[1] www.blogdelnarco.com: http://www.blogdelnarco.com/
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2011, 00:21:35 »
The Secretary of State makes some helpful comments. Explained here.

Too funny to resist, but also a sober truth...
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.