Author Topic: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy  (Read 536508 times)

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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2050 on: July 10, 2017, 21:55:50 »
Seen.  Thanks
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Offline NavyShooter

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2051 on: July 10, 2017, 22:37:27 »
That "pedestal" is capable of fitting a C-6 if I recall correctly.  There is a locker in the cabin for it.

The cabin is *just* large enough to fit the gear needed for a Klein 5000 series Side scan SONAR system.

Insert disclaimer statement here....

:panzer:

Offline FSTO

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2052 on: July 10, 2017, 22:46:06 »
We got those shortly before I left Sea Div in 07. They were/are garbage.

Offline Colin P

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2053 on: July 11, 2017, 10:30:10 »
How so? I note they are using 3 for the McKenzie River run

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2054 on: July 11, 2017, 10:47:40 »
Apparently built by ABCO out of Lunenburg?  No implied reference to quality with that.

http://www.abco.ca/32-twin-jet-navy-patrol-boat.html
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Offline FSTO

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2055 on: July 11, 2017, 11:42:51 »
How so? I note they are using 3 for the McKenzie River run

They are? Wow. I don't know where they hid the 2 we got on the west coast but they were able to find 3 functioning ones eh. Well colour me surprised!

So when we got them at Sea Div in 06 or 07, the Seaborne Base Defence Force had been up and running since shortly after 9-11 and the Navy had been looking for something that could be more useful 24/7 and in all weather than the Ribs we were using at the time.
So out of the blue these two boats show up and Sea Div was told to start training the FP people on them. Well there was no SOR, no LCMM set up to support (when I called Ottawa I got a "?????, who the **** ordered these things) no QSP writing board to flesh out what the training syllabus would be. Nothing.
Then we took them out and they were okay in the harbour but as soon as you went past Fisgaard Light they got the crap beat out of them, they leaked and there was no transverse watertight bulkhead to mitigate this issue in case the boat was holed. As I said before there was no support for the boat, the engines, nor for the electronics. So it was an orphan that nobody wanted to take responsibility for.
We tried to make it work and the FP folks took it but it only stayed within the harbour limits. I have no idea how they worked in Halifax but I have a feeling it wasn't very well.
When I left Sea Div in 08 I think the boats were sitting on blocks on B Jetty.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 14:01:44 by FSTO »

Offline Colin P

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2056 on: July 11, 2017, 12:52:34 »
Thanks for the info, I saw a video on FB I am trying to find


MacKenzie River Run
In the North, the RCN will operate small boats on Great Slave Lake in July. Two boats will potentially circumnavigate Great Slave Lake, while an additional two boats will proceed from Hay River up the MacKenzie River to Tuktoyaktuk.

Using Joint Task Force North’s Operation Nunakput, an annual surveillance and presence operation, as a backdrop, the RCN will gain valuable insight into small boat internal water operations and Canadian Ranger cooperation. Sailors will celebrate Canada 150 as modern-day voyageurs of Canada’s internal waters.

These signature events are just a sample of what the RCN has planned for the year, as a host of other events will be held in communities across the country from ships’ visits to maritime galas to participation in the Invictus Games.

“This is an exciting time to be a Canadian and part of the navy,” says VAdm Lloyd. “We have many wonderful activities planned for this special year, and I hope that all Canadians will have the chance to celebrate this milestone alongside members of the RCN.”

Offline MilEME09

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2057 on: July 11, 2017, 13:04:13 »
Meanwhile in the US
http://www.defensenews.com/articles/us-navy-releases-specs-for-a-proposed-guided-missile-frigate-a-break-from-the-littoral-combat-ship
Quote
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Navy is looking for inputs from industry on a new multimission guided-missile frigate adapted from existing ship designs, a major departure from its modular littoral combat ship, according to a request for information released Monday.

The RFI lays out a ship that opens the door to almost any existing design that can be adapted to the Navy’s needs, which extends beyond just the two LCS hull forms being built by Lockheed Martin and Austal USA.

The service is looking for a ship with combat and mechanical systems that will fully integrate with a carrier strike group, hunt submarines and kill ships over the horizon. Labeling the ship the FFG(X), the ship will be expected to keep up with the full carrier strike group and be able to operate independently in high-end threat environments.

The Navy is looking to avoid "sticker shock," said Rear Adm. Ronald Boxall, the service's director of surface warfare, said in a Monday telephone interview, and engage with ship builders about what trade-offs the Navy would have to make to get the most capability from the ship.

"This is an effort to get the design right up front," Boxall said. "We're looking to have a dialogue with industry to get the most capability for the best price."

Boxall did not say how much the U.S. Navy is willing to spend but said the RFI was intended to draw out what the U.S. Navy could get for its shipbuilding dollar.

In order to get the ship to the fleet as fast as possible, the U.S. Navy wants builders to adapt from existing designs, the RFI said.

"A competition for FFG(X) is envisioned to consider existing parent designs for a Small Surface Combatant that can be modified to accommodate the specific capability requirements prescribed by the US Navy," it reads.

The U.S. Navy wants a frigate that can keep up with the aircraft carrier — a nagging problem with the current classes of small surface combatants — and have sensors networked in with the rest of the fleet to expand the overall tactical picture available to the group.

“The FFG(X) will normally aggregate into strike groups and Large Surface Combatant led surface action groups but also possess the ability to robustly defend itself during conduct of independent operations while connected and contributing to the fleet tactical grid.”

The U.S. Navy would like for the ship to be able to:

    Kill surface ships over the horizon
    Detect enemy submarines
    Defend convoy ships
    Employ active and passive electronic warfare systems
    Defend against swarming small boat attacks

The U.S. Navy is looking to limit the number of ground-breaking technologies that go into the ship, looking for engineering and combat systems that are already common in the fleet.

The U.S. Navy lists several capabilities, among the most important including:

    A fixed, phased-array radar
    An "AEGIS-derivative" combat system that uses a common source library
    The ability to launch a single MH-60R Seahawk helicopter
    Four canister launched over-the-horizon weapons
    SeaRAM
    MQ-8C Firescout

Other capabilities in "tier two" include various sonar equipment such as variable-depth and towed-array sonar, Cooperative Engagement Capability to be able to share target data with other ships and aircraft in the fleet, rigid-hull inflatable boats, Next Generation Surface Search Radar, and a MK 110 57mm gun and related systems.

The U.S. Navy wants the ship to be used for surface and anti-submarine warfare — traditional frigate roles — and to take on lower-level missions, such as security cooperation, that don't require multibillion-dollar warships. It also must be hardened against electronic warfare attack.

The U.S. Navy is also particularly interested in having the frigate be a platform for deploying unmanned systems "to penetrate and dwell in contested environments, operating at greater risk to gain sensor and weapons advantages over the adversary."

The frigate should be able to establish a complicated picture of a tactical environment with its on-board sensors, unmanned systems and embarked aircraft and beam that information back to the fleet through secure communications.

The U.S. Navy intends to award the contract for the first FFG(X) in 2020. It will buy one in 2020 and one in 2021, followed by two each year after that. The U.S. Navy's requirement is for 52 small-surface combatants, the bulk of which will be LCS.


I wonder if it would be possible for us to just combine programs with the states, have American and Canadian yards building the same ships for both nations.
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2058 on: July 11, 2017, 13:14:26 »
https://www.facebook.com/FOIN.JTFN/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE

The "Inshore Jet Boats" being put into the water for Nunakput 2017 by crane from a low-loader.





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Offline FSTO

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2059 on: July 11, 2017, 13:54:43 »
Meanwhile in the US
http://www.defensenews.com/articles/us-navy-releases-specs-for-a-proposed-guided-missile-frigate-a-break-from-the-littoral-combat-ship
I wonder if it would be possible for us to just combine programs with the states, have American and Canadian yards building the same ships for both nations.

I think that ship has sailed (pun intended).
But if we had a forward looking and agile bureaucracy that could seize on a opportunity to get more bang for the buck. Oh why do I waste bandwidth, it'll never happen.

But for the USN; man after DDX, Zumwalt, LCS and even the Ford class carrier the transformation generation sure got their genitals hammered flat. Sometimes those bright young folks in short pants (and skirts) are just too smart for their own good.

Offline Chief Stoker

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2060 on: July 11, 2017, 14:08:33 »
Thanks for the info, I saw a video on FB I am trying to find


MacKenzie River Run
In the North, the RCN will operate small boats on Great Slave Lake in July. Two boats will potentially circumnavigate Great Slave Lake, while an additional two boats will proceed from Hay River up the MacKenzie River to Tuktoyaktuk.

Using Joint Task Force North’s Operation Nunakput, an annual surveillance and presence operation, as a backdrop, the RCN will gain valuable insight into small boat internal water operations and Canadian Ranger cooperation. Sailors will celebrate Canada 150 as modern-day voyageurs of Canada’s internal waters.

These signature events are just a sample of what the RCN has planned for the year, as a host of other events will be held in communities across the country from ships’ visits to maritime galas to participation in the Invictus Games.

“This is an exciting time to be a Canadian and part of the navy,” says VAdm Lloyd. “We have many wonderful activities planned for this special year, and I hope that all Canadians will have the chance to celebrate this milestone alongside members of the RCN.”

Here is a collection of photos I have of Operation Nunakput  https://www.facebook.com/pg/GOCANADANAVY/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1533451013380290

If you look under videos I have a number of videos from the trip.
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All opinions stated are not official policy of the CF and of a private individual

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Offline Colin P

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2061 on: July 11, 2017, 14:26:14 »
It was a great idea and long overdue, kudos to all involved.

Offline Colin P

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2062 on: July 17, 2017, 15:34:07 »

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #2063 on: July 17, 2017, 22:27:18 »
Thanks Colin.

I never cease to be amazed at what people can do when left to their own devices.
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