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The Woodworking Thread

Scott

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ModlrMike said:
Depending on how much threading you need done, they'll often do it at the store when you buy the pipe.

Yeah, been there previous with projects. Could have been the small town I was in at the time, but there was a charge for it - likely because I am not talking huge numbers. For fifty bucks I can thread three sizes right at home, that ain't bad.

Material is kind of hard to sort, I don't imagine industrial suppliers have caught on to guys like me using this stuff decoratively ;D
 

Pusser

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Virtually all tools go on sale at Canadian Tire at some point.  It's cyclical. 
Patience is a virtue.  Costco can also be a good source, but you generally have to jump on it when you see it.
 

GAP

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Scott said:
Yeah, been there previous with projects. Could have been the small town I was in at the time, but there was a charge for it - likely because I am not talking huge numbers. For fifty bucks I can thread three sizes right at home, that ain't bad.

Material is kind of hard to sort, I don't imagine industrial suppliers have caught on to guys like me using this stuff decoratively ;D

The next time you are home, check out the local scrap yards...especially the sole owner types....they stock all kinds of material that you can bargin for.
 

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GAP said:
The next time you are home, check out the local scrap yards...especially the sole owner types....they stock all kinds of material that you can bargin for.

That's on the hit list as well.

With a ratchet pipe threader I am going to end up pretty versatile!
 

sidemount

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Canadian Tire and Home Depot sales have saved me a ton of money. I don't think I've ever paid full price for a power tool haha!

As well, I finally got the headboard finished. I installed/attached it to the bedframe that I had made a couple weeks earlier.
It turned out pretty good and the wife is happy....which is all that counts I guess haha.


 

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Good2Golf

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Nice job, sidemount! :nod:
 

Scott

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Beauty work.

The next big thing I am costing is a shed for the yard. Seems moving an older one isn't worth the aggravation - given I can't get answers from anyone!

I'll see what timber costs are and go from there.
 

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Thanks!

I would agree that moving an old shed isn't really worth the hassle. With the cost of dimensional lumber, you can build a custom one that fits your needs and not break the bank....unless you want to go all out haha.
 

GAP

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Scott said:
The next big thing I am costing is a shed for the yard. Seems moving an older one isn't worth the aggravation - given I can't get answers from anyone!

I'll see what timber costs are and go from there.

If you do, build it in 3 or 4 ft sections that bolt together.....that way "shed will travel"
 

Scott

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GAP said:
If you do, build it in 3 or 4 ft sections that bolt together.....that way "shed will travel"

Been thinking about that...

I have to see my quotes first. I've kind of set an upper limit for a move, and we'll see what we reach with it. The original is pretty well build and nice exterior work, to boot. My wife just happens to know that labor to build a new one is free!
 

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Finished the convertible picnic table (posted above).  Turned out great, super useful and the angled backs make it really comfortable benches.  When I remember, I will post some pictures, but the plans are easy to follow with great results.  Only difference is I used 12' boards cut in half to make it 6' wide (vice 5' from the plan), so you can fit six people on it if needed, but loads of room for four with room for all the food for serving, so great for bbqs.

Next project is the end grain cutting board; have been making do with a plastic one but getting tired of sharpening my costco set all the time, so figured it's time.  Don't have a planer so will be busting out the belt sander and hand planer, and it's an excuse to replace the bar clamps that didn't make the move.  I figure I can make an unreasonably big one for about the same price as what I can by an A4 size one for, so should be fun

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-SUPER-SWEET-cutting-board/
 

Scott

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Update on the router: DeWalt supplied me with the proper size/thread of the screws they use before I got home again, so that was sorted.

The shed will likely be built by the local high school. They have designs for everything and I only have to supply materials and a boom truck. Neighbor (a teacher) has offered his driveway for offloading. Sorted (I hope)

My Dremel really came into its own recently: I have been using it to strip bark from inner seams of large birch. My wife found some diamond bits online for about 15 bucks and so I have been drilling beack glass and shells for her. Oddly therapeutic.
 

Navy_Pete

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That sounds pretty sweet Scott, I wouldn't have thought off that for getting it built.

Does anyone have experience using some of these wood shaping/planers that fit on a grinder?  I don't have the shop space for any of that (or the money laying around for a quality planer) so thought these might be good to be able to pick up and play around with.

I'm sure there are other companies that make similar ones, but was looking at something like this;

https://www.arbortechtools.com/au/turbo-range/

Looks pretty sweet, so going to poke around for something made a bit closer than AUS if I can.
 

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If you're looking to thickness or flatten wood without a planer, make a sled for your router. You can get a flat bottom bit and make a frame, like in this video. Unless I completely misunderstand your question.
 

Scott

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Navy_Pete said:
That sounds pretty sweet Scott, I wouldn't have thought off that for getting it built.

I'll update of course, it's not a for sure thing yet. Waiting on the neighbor to get back with info.

Does anyone have experience using some of these wood shaping/planers that fit on a grinder?  I don't have the shop space for any of that (or the money laying around for a quality planer) so thought these might be good to be able to pick up and play around with.

I'm sure there are other companies that make similar ones, but was looking at something like this;

https://www.arbortechtools.com/au/turbo-range/

Looks pretty sweet, so going to poke around for something made a bit closer than AUS if I can.

ModlrMike said:
If you're looking to thickness or flatten wood without a planer, make a sled for your router. You can get a flat bottom bit and make a frame, like in this video. Unless I completely misunderstand your question.

Was thinking the same thing.

I've seen the grinder attachments used for pre finishing larger carvings, like the chainsaw type - and maybe that's what you're driving at for a use? If not, why not Mike's idea or a hand power plane? I watched a wicked tutorial a few years back about measuring, leveling, and stringing a larger piece to ensure a flat surface after many passes - can't find it now :mad:
 

Navy_Pete

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Thanks guys, that's a pretty handy setup, I hadn't thought of using the router for that; I can definitely build that jig up and use it for a few projects I have in mind, and finish it off with a nice old hand planer I inherited.  With a sacrificial strip on the edges that would be a quick way to plane the cutting board, and also need a workbench that's higher up so I don't hunch over all the time (which is probably karma for laughing at short friends while going through engineering school who are keeping the design height at 5'6" for everything).

I was more looking at the wood carving grinder bits as well, but the planer attachment would be handy for flattening an area on a carving I guess.  I've seen some pretty interesting carvings made up with layered plywood blocks and thought that the grinder carving wheel would be a good way to play around with that a bit.
 

Scott

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Time for a bit of an update:

I'm finally rolling in the shop. I have the dust extractor going, the cyclone works like a charm, and I made another unit to collect planer shavings - because a DW 735 chucks 'em like nobody's business.

In various stages of development right now:
-shoe storage/bench with a live edge maple top.
-several tables from reclaimed red cedar.
-another live edge bench to be married with smithed iron.
-a big frigging slab of birch.
-table/bar top made from ripped and side profiled birch ply, which I am really amped to get done.

Why I am really here today: I have a Jos Cote 119 bandsaw and I am pretty much out of options asking for anything written on the thing. Even a schematic would be better than what I have, which is SFA. The thing belonged to my grandfather and has not run in at least 15 years, but still turns true and easily. Some of the guides will need work, and the whole thing needs to be stripped and painted, but it's too nostalgic to sell, and it's a 19 inch and those, brand new, ain't cheap.

Anyone? Bueller?

Cheers
 

Pusser

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Scott said:
Time for a bit of an update:

I'm finally rolling in the shop. I have the dust extractor going, the cyclone works like a charm, and I made another unit to collect planer shavings - because a DW 735 chucks 'em like nobody's business.

In various stages of development right now:
-shoe storage/bench with a live edge maple top.
-several tables from reclaimed red cedar.
-another live edge bench to be married with smithed iron.
-a big frigging slab of birch.
-table/bar top made from ripped and side profiled birch ply, which I am really amped to get done.

Why I am really here today: I have a Jos Cote 119 bandsaw and I am pretty much out of options asking for anything written on the thing. Even a schematic would be better than what I have, which is SFA. The thing belonged to my grandfather and has not run in at least 15 years, but still turns true and easily. Some of the guides will need work, and the whole thing needs to be stripped and painted, but it's too nostalgic to sell, and it's a 19 inch and those, brand new, ain't cheap.

Anyone? Bueller?

Cheers

Band saws are likely one of the simplest machine tools and they haven't changed much from inception.  Furthermore, although they're certainly not all identical, I would argue that they're all similar enough that generic instructions are all you should need.  There are plenty of books (and I would assume YouTube videos on how to maintain and tune band saws of any variety).  For the most part, a band saw consists of two wheels. The drive wheel is generally fixed, so the only maintenance you should need would be to the motor.  The other wheel is a little trickier in that it has adjustments:  The tension adjustment moves the wheel up and down to increase/decrease the tension on the blade.  Correct blade tension is important because if it's too tight, you risk snapping the blade and if it's too loose, the blade can drift or even fall off.  Many band saws actually have a tally plate telling you how tight the blade should be (tension varies with blade size).  The other adjustment is for centering the blade on the wheels.  This is simply a matter of tilting the wheel towards or away from the front until the blade is centered on the wheel.  I recommend turning the wheels by hand to do this initially and then checking it with the motor running.  With a little practice, you can get quite proficient with this.

All in all, a band saw is a great tool.  It cuts smoothly because the blade is always going in the same direction.  It's great for curved cuts (much better than a scroll saw), but can't really do an inside cut unless you have the skills to re-weld the blade.  The biggest downside I see is that a truly straight cut is difficult to achieve and that you can't really sharpen the blade.  It also has the advantage of forcing all the sawdust downward where it is easily collected by a dust collection system and less likely to be processed through your lungs.
 

Scott

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Thanks for your input. This had been my fallback, under the assumption that generic would do. I did know most of the operating of one, having used them long ago - and it's pretty intuitive just looking. Thankfully there's also a load of info out there re: blade tensioning as well as drive belt tensioning/rpm.

My super last ditch effort was to email a distant cousin who owns several lumber type operations and who may actually still have one of these.

If I need parts is where it might get scary, but a Canadian woodworking forum indicates that some are interchangeable with a little modification.

This will be a winter long project and I can't wait to see end results. It will more than handle everything I could ever want to do with it.
 

Scott

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Update on the saw: no progress except learning, and I am fine with that because this isn't something I want to fuck up. Someone sent me an advert for the saw which dates it to pre-1955. My millwright brother-in-law and I were drinking beer ten feet from the machine when he exclaimed at its good shape, so I asked some bearing related questions and got that end sorted.

Work will begin on it once I clear some projects out.
 
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