• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Tpr Stefan Jankowski

PMedMoe

Army.ca Legend
Donor
Reaction score
1,100
Points
940
Found this via a friend's FB status.

Obituary - Windsor Star

JANKOWSKI, Tpr. Stefan George Passed away suddenly on July 9, 2011 in Windsor, Ontario, Stefan was born November 1, 1985.  Loving son of Georgina Duguay and Bruce Timothy, and Stan Jankowski.  Dearest father of Destiny and Alexis.  Cherished brother of Jessica and Ashton.  Much loved grandson of Phyllis and the late Lionel Duguay, and Jozefa and the late Stefan Jankowski.  Dearest friend and mother of his children Michelle Timothy.  Stefan is survived by many extended family members from the Duguay, Timothy, and Jankowski families. Stefan served in Afghanistan in the Canadian Military and he was stationed in Petawawa.

RIP  :salute:
 
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/canada-in-afghanistan/Soldier+death+blamed+combat+stress+indifferent+military/5098452/story.html

WINDSOR, Ont. — Dodging bullets from children, stumbling across a boy with his face blown off and grasping a dead friend in his arms — the horror was more than Stefan Jankowski could bear.


Diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and hooked on prescription drugs, the 25-year-old Windsor soldier returned home from the war in Afghanistan to face a losing battle with his own demons.
His family said he died Saturday from a prescription drug overdose, after getting little help from the military he dreamt of serving from boyhood.
They want answers, saying the military "washed their hands of him" and didn't give Jankowski the help he needed after he was discharged.

"You can't put a gun in his hand, he can't even take care of himself," said father Bruce Timothy. "So they don't need him anymore.
"He's been found in the front yard of his house jumping over the railing, thought he was still in the war, running around on the grass in his underwear."
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can develop following traumatic events that threaten great bodily harm. It can lead to anxiety, depression, violence and suicide.

Jankowski's problems worsened when he got hooked on painkillers and drugs prescribed for PTSD. He overdosed sometime after his lawyer Paul Esco dropped him off early Saturday at his rooming house. His body was found the next day.
Jankowski leaves behind two daughters Destiny, 7, Alexis, 4.
"He had enough drugs in his room to service his problems for a long time," said Timothy.

According to the National Defence Department, five per cent of soldiers deployed to war zones suffer from PTSD, depression or both. Roughly 37,000 Canadian soldiers have deployed to Afghanistan, which suggests that about 1,850 of them have developed PTSD.
As of March 31 this year, 14,111 Canadian Forces members and veterans were receiving disability benefits from Veterans Affairs Canada for various "operational stress injuries." Of those, 9,928 have PTSD.

Cpl. Hunter Kersey, who served with Jankowski in Afghanistan from Oct. 2009 to May 2010, said he knew his friend was in trouble.
"I watched the whole thing unfold," said Kersey. "It was a classic case of post-traumatic stress disorder. It was a downward spiral right from the beginning. It wasn't good as soon as he came back."

They were in southern Kandahar with the Royal Canadian Dragoons, doing reconnaissance and looking for improvised explosive devices.
"He was the first guy in and the last guy out," said Kersey. "He often volunteered for the most dangerous positions."
It was a job Jankowski dreamt about his whole life.

"When he was four years old, that was all he talked about, joining the military," said his mother Georgina Duguay, clutching her son's dog tags. "He was just so interested in it. When he came of age, he finally got his dream of going to the military.
"I was proud of him. Just seeing him in his uniform, he just seemed so happy and content."
That was before Afghanistan.

"At one point he told me a boy, half his face was missing," said Duguay. "He said, 'God mom, you can't believe the stuff you'd see over here.'"
Esco said he also heard some horrific stories from Jankowski. The troubled soldier once talked about being in a convoy when the truck behind him, carrying his friend, drove over a bomb.

"He ran back, grabbed his best friend out," said Esco. "His best friend died in his arms.
"His friend just said, 'Tell my parents I love them.'"
Esco said his client was also haunted by having to fire on what appeared to be children shooting at them.
"'They didn't all shoot at me,' he'd say, 'but you didn't know which ones, so we were told to shoot at these people.'"

It was also clear to Jankowski's family there were problems. He hallucinated. He was plagued by nightmares. He couldn't sleep. He would close his eyes and hear gunfire.
On the day he died, he picked up 40 Oxycodone pills from the drugstore. He was also on Diazepam, claudadine and Rhovane, to name a few.
"He told me when he does the drugs that it takes everything away," said Duguay. "It didn't hurt anymore."

In addition to the PTSD meds, Jankowski had been wounded and was prescribed drugs for that.
"That intensified all the drugs because then he was on painkillers and he was on stuff to sleep," said his aunt, Rachel Duguay. "It just totally escalated."
The drugs also got him in trouble with the law. Jankowski had been charged with mischief, uttering threats, breach of recognizance, fraud and passing forged documents.

"He was addicted and he was going to do anything he had to do to get the money to get drugs," said Timothy. "It was a problem."
He also landed behind bars for going AWOL from CFB Petawawa a couple times.
"They gave him his medications and said you're off for the week," said Timothy. "Then he just never went back because he was on drugs. So they arrested him."
Jankowski's family said they want to know where the military assistance was as he spiralled out of control.

Officials knew Jankowski was troubled before he was discharged, said Timothy. He added that the soldier was given drugs but little other support or assessment.
"The military was good to him, as a trooper," said Timothy. "But when it came to giving him professional help because of the things he saw and the things that happened, the military made mistakes. Their program is improper. The people that need help are not getting it, or they're not getting it fast enough."

Someone should have caught on to the fact that Jankowski was in serious need of help before he was discharged, Timothy said.
"When you come home and you're all messed up and they put you on drugs and they've got you on painkillers and medications so you can sleep, obviously there's a problem," he said. "They ignored that. They just said, 'You're discharged.'"
Timothy said his son had tried to get into programs out of town, but got stalled on waiting lists.

"They should have shipped him right there. Not here," said Timothy. "He should have went straight to there to clean him up, make sure he's OK before he leaves. Don't just send him to a doctor and give him a pile of pills and say, 'You're on your own.'"
He said the most help Jankowski got was some group counselling sessions that included horseback riding.
"Going horseback riding for an afternoon with a couple guys that were in the army before, to me, is not going to clear up his drug problems," said Timothy. "And it's not going to clear his head."

The Canadian Forces said there was no one available Wednesday to comment. A spokeswoman with Veterans Affairs Canada said in an email that organization has "greatly expanded" its mental-health services, including doubling to 10 the number of specialized clinics.
Janice Summerby said nine of those are outpatient clinics. The other is a residential treatment clinic at Ste. Anne's Hospital near Montreal. They also provide tele-mental health services, she said.
Jankowski also went to local hospitals in the days leading up to his death. Esco said he took him to triage at Hotel-Dieu Grace Hospital last Thursday night.

"He told them he was suicidal," said Esco, possibly the last person to see Jankowski alive.
Esco said he left Jankowski in the waiting room and told him to call if there were any problems.
"Apparently they wouldn't take him," said Esco.

The following day he was taken to Metropolitan hospital. He didn't get admitted there either. Esco picked him up around midnight.
Esco dropped Jankowski off at home and told him to call Monday. His body was discovered Sunday.
"They didn't keep him," Duguay said of the hospitals. "If they would have kept him, he might still be alive today."

Officials with both hospitals said they couldn't talk about specific cases. Hotel-Dieu Grace spokesman Steve Erwin did say that when someone appears with mental health issues, "it's taken seriously" with multi-layered assessments. But if the patient arrives voluntarily, he said, they have to agree to treatment.
"If a person is here voluntarily, we have no right under the law to hold them," Erwin said. "We can't force someone to stay here against their will."

© Copyright (c) The Windsor Star

 
Such a truly heartbreaking story... His experiences plagued his mind, and took over the brain of a once proud soldier... into what others would call a monster, all because nobody gave two sh#ts to help him. He was driven mad and criminally out of control, he couldn't control himself.

I have never experienced anything like this, but I have (and continue to) suffered from major depressive disorder... unfortunately it's in the bloodline. I've been to that point where your friends, your family and your medication doesn't help anymore, you can't help yourself anymore and you need proper professional help. I've been in that limbo but not nearly to the same extent.

The part that disturbs me the most:

"If a person is here voluntarily, we have no right under the law to hold them," Erwin said. "We can't force someone to stay here against their will."

I checked into a Mental Health unit voluntarily, yet I was Form 10'd while I was in there because they felt I needed further assistance AND they can do so if they think the patient(s) in question will refuse treatment. So technically I was being held against my will, but in one way there was sound reason (that's also why there's a Mental Health Review Panel so you can appeal the Form if you feel you don't need to be in for the full 30 days... 3 months... 6 months etc). But that's just my experience so... Each situation varies and also by province.

May his soul rest peacefully  :salute:
 
Im sad to hear of Stefan passing away, and especially for his children. I knew stefan for most of his military career.

Stefan was released from the military 6 months ago. He was given more than enough help and ample oppurtunities to straighten up.

As for the above traumatic incidents, he was either never involved with them, or they flat out never happened. No one on our tour, or ever attached to use ever died overseas. No kids ever shot at us, or did we ever shot at kids. And the face incident was a with a man not a boy, and he wasnt there. This is just a tragic case of drug use taking over his life. Nothing more, nothing less.

From a comrade who was there.

Wow, found this is now on the front page of the National Post. Everyone Ive talked to from his tour agrees this is complete rubbish.
 
Thank you for the update Hulk.

Sad case at any rate, but now maybe people will quit speculating, going off half cocked while believing everything they read in the paper.

I've heard from someone exceptionally close to the case and he echoes your sentiments.

It just reminds us all, we have to stay vigilant, watch our buddies and help when we can.

Audax et Celer :salute:
 
RIP TPR Jankowski  :salute:
Condolences to Family, Comrade's and Friend's.
Audax et Celer
Bold and Swift
Scoty B
 
I've deleted one. I'll delete more. No cause of death has officially been established.

Because "THE PRESS" is speculating about cause of death, we won't degrade ourselves by doing the same.

Quit guessing and trying to be cool and in the know.

The next person that posts innaccurate or improper information, because of malice or ignorance, gets run up to C&P.

Oh, and your sacred cow of the, Canadian Press, doesn't count as a reliable source, because they are not. They have made a total ballsup of this story, from front to back.

Milnet.ca Staff
 
Thank-You Dave,
Re: Speculating ect: Press
otherwise.
Bold and Swift Brother,
You wore the Badge.
Scoty B
 
I am Stefan's daughter, Destiny. It has been hard without him here. Not a day goes by without missing him. I see that there is possibly more to the story? Everything was hidden from me as a kid, and I don't know the truth as to what really happened.

I appreciate all the replies on here. Unfortunately, since the Military has switched insurance companies, my sister cannot access any of her benefits. My mother had fallen into the opioid epidemic, and we have had no contact for years. I am wondering if anyone else has experienced something similar since this happened. I cannot be the only one who has lost one parent and the other to drugs.

Dad, I love you, and I miss you so much. I am so sorry for all you had to go through. There are not enough words to express how much I miss you. I wish you could of seen me graduate, go to prom, get my 1st car, get my 1st job and start my 1st day of university. .. I wish that you could be here with me every day. I always have part of you with me. I love you to the moon and back.

Thank you to everyone who has served in our Military. I wish you all well!
 
I am Stefan's daughter, Destiny. It has been hard without him here. Not a day goes by without missing him. I see that there is possibly more to the story? Everything was hidden from me as a kid, and I don't know the truth as to what really happened.

I appreciate all the replies on here. Unfortunately, since the Military has switched insurance companies, my sister cannot access any of her benefits. My mother had fallen into the opioid epidemic, and we have had no contact for years. I am wondering if anyone else has experienced something similar since this happened. I cannot be the only one who has lost one parent and the other to drugs.

Dad, I love you, and I miss you so much. I am so sorry for all you had to go through. There are not enough words to express how much I miss you. I wish you could of seen me graduate, go to prom, get my 1st car, get my 1st job and start my 1st day of university. .. I wish that you could be here with me every day. I always have part of you with me. I love you to the moon and back.

Thank you to everyone who has served in our Military. I wish you all well!
Please feel free to reply if you have any information about my dad, Stefan. I would love to hear the things and experiences he had as I was too young to remember.

If you have your opinion about the switch from Sunlife to CanadaLife, please voice it.
Everyone I have talked to about this situation at CanadaLife has tried to help get my sister access, but unfortunately, it is within the legislation. This situation would need an exception from the government.

I can't be the only one who this has happened to. It is not right that it is assumed everyone has a nuclear family.
 
Back
Top