Author Topic: Wearing Uniform in Public (Cadets)  (Read 91770 times)

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Offline Pusser

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #75 on: March 15, 2012, 10:29:30 »
The new material used for cadet uniforms is the same cotton/poly blend used for the white Navy trousers.  Continued pressing with a steam iron (i.e. several weeks worth of daily wear) will eventually cause a razor sharp crease to form.  It will happen.  It just takes awhile.  Another trick is to take some brown paper towel (the standard found in most CF washrooms), soak it in water, wring it out and use it as a pressing cloth.  It has a starch-like effect on polyester (notwithstanding that regular spray starch is useless on that stuff).

When I was a cadet, a lot of us used to alter our uniforms to get a better fit.  I will admit that the guys had an easier time of it, but we still had problems.  My biggest complaint was that the silly belt was too high.  I used to cut it off (they were sewn on back then) and wear a white belt instead (my position in the corps had me wearing a white belt anyway).
« Last Edit: March 15, 2012, 17:31:21 by Pusser »
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Offline William Hoskins

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #76 on: March 15, 2012, 14:54:25 »
I am a Sgt. at my local cadet corps and I just tell the younger kids, don't try to shortcut your uniform, because #1 you are to young to know what your doing and get away with it, and #2 Your uniform can be just as good if you take some time away from the TVs and computers and spend a few minutes a night touching up your uniform, Just 10 Min's can make a big difference.

Offline Cui

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #77 on: March 15, 2012, 15:21:47 »
I am a Sgt. at my local cadet corps and I just tell the younger kids, don't try to shortcut your uniform, because #1 you are to young to know what your doing and get away with it, and #2 Your uniform can be just as good if you take some time away from the TVs and computers and spend a few minutes a night touching up your uniform, Just 10 Min's can make a big difference.

I think I ran out of breath just reading this in my head.
Don't tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and let them surprise you with their results. - George Patton

Offline RemembranceDay

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #78 on: March 15, 2012, 15:38:34 »
I am a Sgt. at my local cadet corps and I just tell the younger kids, don't try to shortcut your uniform, because #1 you are to young to know what your doing and get away with it, and #2 Your uniform can be just as good if you take some time away from the TVs and computers and spend a few minutes a night touching up your uniform, Just 10 Min's can make a big difference.

Can you clarify this? "You're too young to know what you're doing", and then you contradict yourself (or so it seems) with Your uniform can be just as good if you take some time away from the TVs and computers and spend a few minutes a night touching up your uniform, Just 10 Min's can make a big difference.

It's like you're telling them "don't do your uniform.", and then telling them to take ten minutes a night.... Not understanding this.

Offline Danjanou

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #79 on: March 15, 2012, 15:43:30 »
Can you clarify this? "You're too young to know what you're doing", and then you contradict yourself (or so it seems) with Your uniform can be just as good if you take some time away from the TVs and computers and spend a few minutes a night touching up your uniform, Just 10 Min's can make a big difference.

It's like you're telling them "don't do your uniform.", and then telling them to take ten minutes a night.... Not understanding this.


Good, glad I wasn''t the only one who was confused. I thought I was having another seniors moment there. :-[
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Offline Loachman

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #80 on: March 15, 2012, 15:52:48 »
Perhaps if there'd been proper sentence structure, including a period or two in there, you would have been able to breathe properly and your brain would not have been so oxygen-deprived by the time that you got to the end.

You did make it to the end, right?

But no - regular breathing didn't help me to understand either.

And I'll not even mention the incorrect use of "your" instead of "you're" (a contraction of "you are"), which always causes me to consume oxygen at an increased rate.

Offline Journeyman

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #81 on: March 15, 2012, 16:02:34 »
And I'll not even mention the incorrect use of "your" instead of "you're"....

   ;D
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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #82 on: March 15, 2012, 16:08:17 »
.... Another trick is to take some brown (the standard found in most CF washrooms), soak it in water, wring it out and use it as a pressing cloth.  It has a starch-like effect on polyester (notwithstanding that regular spray starch is useless on that stuff) ....
I hope you're talking about brown paper towels, here, because, well, anything else brown you might find in most CF washrooms, well, wouldn't do such a great job....
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Offline William Hoskins

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #83 on: March 15, 2012, 17:28:29 »
What I mean is that they should'nt try short cutting on their uniform. Just spending the time working on it is enough.

Offline William Hoskins

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #84 on: March 15, 2012, 17:33:24 »
And I apologize for the improper use of punctuation.

Offline Pusser

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #85 on: March 15, 2012, 17:34:15 »
I hope you're talking about brown paper towels, here, because, well, anything else brown you might find in most CF washrooms, well, wouldn't do such a great job....

Right you are.  Fixed that.
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Offline Pusser

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #86 on: March 15, 2012, 17:37:16 »
What I mean is that they should'nt try short cutting on their uniform. Just spending the time working on it is enough.

Re-read what you have written here. You are implying that a short-cut would actually take longer and be more work than doing it properly, but that's not what you mean.
Sure, apes read Nietzsche.  They just don't understand it.

Offline William Hoskins

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #87 on: March 15, 2012, 17:45:42 »
I mean when they use stuff like liquid shoe polish on their boots for example, the polish is going to crack causing them to have to do more work in the long run. So the short cut caused them to do more work than it would have taken to do it properly.

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #88 on: March 15, 2012, 17:57:52 »
Please make it stop...

 :grouphug:
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Offline Pusser

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #89 on: March 15, 2012, 18:06:43 »
I mean when they use stuff like liquid shoe polish on their boots for example, the polish is going to crack causing them to have to do more work in the long run. So the short cut caused them to do more work than it would have taken to do it properly.

I understand what your trying to say.  You're just not saying it very well.

I'm not trying to be a d**k, but communication, particularly written communication, is an important military skill.  You need some practice.  I realize that you're only 15, but it's not too soon to learn to write properly.  Good writing is not as simple as writing down what you think you would say under the circumstances.  It's a little more complex than that.  We use, grammar, spelling, syntax (seemingly your biggest difficulty) and punctuation to express ourselves in order to be understood.  You can get books on these things, or talk to your English teacher.  I can also suggest reading actual, well-written books.  If you read enough good writing, it eventually rubs off.
Sure, apes read Nietzsche.  They just don't understand it.

Offline Get Nautical

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #90 on: March 15, 2012, 19:34:24 »
The new material used for cadet uniforms is the same cotton/poly blend used for the white Navy trousers.  Continued pressing with a steam iron (i.e. several weeks worth of daily wear) will eventually cause a razor sharp crease to form.  It will happen.  It just takes awhile.  Another trick is to take some brown paper towel (the standard found in most CF washrooms), soak it in water, wring it out and use it as a pressing cloth.  It has a starch-like effect on polyester (notwithstanding that regular spray starch is useless on that stuff).

When I was a cadet, a lot of us used to alter our uniforms to get a better fit.  I will admit that the guys had an easier time of it, but we still had problems.  My biggest complaint was that the silly belt was too high.  I used to cut it off (they were sewn on back then) and wear a white belt instead (my position in the corps had me wearing a white belt anyway).

Ok those type of pants are easier to crease, at least if they are the same as the cooks white pants...are they the same pants?

I wore the old tunic (made in the 80's) with the half belt this was 2002-2005, it was actually green, compared to the new ones with the full belt that are almost black in comparison.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2012, 19:38:46 by Get Nautical »

Offline RemembranceDay

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #91 on: March 15, 2012, 19:42:46 »
I understand what your trying to say.  You're just not saying it very well.

I'm not trying to be a d**k, but communication, particularly written communication, is an important military skill.  You need some practice.  I realize that you're only 15, but it's not too soon to learn to write properly.  Good writing is not as simple as writing down what you think you would say under the circumstances.  It's a little more complex than that.  We use, grammar, spelling, syntax (seemingly your biggest difficulty) and punctuation to express ourselves in order to be understood.  You can get books on these things, or talk to your English teacher.  I can also suggest reading actual, well-written books.  If you read enough good writing, it eventually rubs off.

Amen to that!


William, while I don't agree with short cuts (I learned the hard way with the liquid boot polish -_- ), it is important that they are taught how to take care of their uniform. I didn't, when I first joined, and couldn't find any information, so I also learned the hard way on a lot of stuff.

Also, I am fourteen years old. Please do not take this as me being a grammar ***** Nazi, but if you'll notice the difference in our grammar, it is a pretty large gap. I NEVER wrote until four-odd years ago. I could, but I didn't. I've been reading since one, so, take note. Reading does work.

Offline William Hoskins

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #92 on: March 15, 2012, 19:54:48 »
Thank you for the understanding, writing has never been a strong point of mine, but it is something I am working on.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2012, 20:23:48 by William Hoskins »

Offline RemembranceDay

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #93 on: March 15, 2012, 19:59:20 »
Thank you for the understanding, writing has never been a strong point of mine, but its is something I am working on.


Glad to hear it. :)

Offline Pusser

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #94 on: March 15, 2012, 21:45:08 »
Ok those type of pants are easier to crease, at least if they are the same as the cooks white pants...are they the same pants?

I wore the old tunic (made in the 80's) with the half belt this was 2002-2005, it was actually green, compared to the new ones with the full belt that are almost black in comparison.

They're not the same as cooks' whites.  You could never use the cadet trousers (or the Navy dress whites for that matter) in a kitchen.  They would offer no protection against burns as they are 75% polyester.  In fact, they would be dangerous in the presence of heat and open flame.
Sure, apes read Nietzsche.  They just don't understand it.

Offline RemembranceDay

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #95 on: March 15, 2012, 22:08:15 »
They're not the same as cooks' whites.  You could never use the cadet trousers (or the Navy dress whites for that matter) in a kitchen.  They would offer no protection against burns as they are 75% polyester.  In fact, they would be dangerous in the presence of heat and open flame.

Getting burned in one of those... One of my worst fears.

Offline Get Nautical

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Re: In public in Uniform...
« Reply #96 on: March 16, 2012, 07:28:05 »
They're not the same as cooks' whites.  You could never use the cadet trousers (or the Navy dress whites for that matter) in a kitchen.  They would offer no protection against burns as they are 75% polyester.  In fact, they would be dangerous in the presence of heat and open flame.

During the field phase of my QL3, melted a hole in my combat pants leaning up against, what I think was the steam line in the kitchen trailer for a split second. ;D

Getting burned in one of those... One of my worst fears.

As a cook you develop sort of a welders hand, to test a cookie I can pick it up in the oven, if it lifts of the sheet (parchment paper) it's pretty much done. When I first started out, I met a civilian cook whom over his numerous years as a chef in many different kitchens, told me he had been burnt at least once, everywhere on his body.
there were not many visible scars, but it didnt take me long to belive him.

Working in galley's on ship with counters that can tilt 45 to 60 degrees, with enough force to send everything flying... I have even been attacked with a knife...it was attached to a magnetic mount on the bakers rack up high and a box of Saran wrap or something on top shifted, caught the tip of the chef knife and sent the knife flying and hitting the counter beside me. It was as if someone threw the knife right in front of me as I was walking, that scared the bejeezus out of me.

My greater fear besides the above ;D would be a knife in the garbarator because god only knows where that shrapnel would fly, or tipping (breaking the tip) of the knife while de-boning a ham etc. rendering the ham unfit to eat because of the shard of metal, also
- Lifting a ham improperly to transfer pans can make it break apart spattering hot grease on you.
- Lifting a big pans of 2 or 3 big round roasts from the oven to put on the counter you have to time it, between the pitches and rolls
- Hot pans of chicken produce grease that has to be drained periodically onto a bucket on the floor add a sea state that is less than ideal.
- Deep frying at sea, not suppose to be done but sometimes it happens
- Lifting hot inserts of soups, sauces, gravy to put on the line, all the while thinking about a story told to me some time ago by a co worker...Someone lifting an insert of reheated meat sauce from the steamer and slips, getting hot meat sauce all or his stomach, the cooks throw cold water on him, rip off his shirt his stomach is covered in second degree burns.
- Steam burns are the worst...
One of my instructors on my QL3 in his younger years accidentaly bumped his fore-arm on a steam jacket kettle for not even a split second, left his skin peeling like glue to the kettle. It left a very visible indent like scar.

 





« Last Edit: March 16, 2012, 09:04:33 by Get Nautical »