Author Topic: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]  (Read 414733 times)

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Offline CBH99

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #825 on: November 14, 2018, 18:51:01 »
Russia doesn't need a large, powerful blue water navy.  It doesn't have the economic or political clout to justify a large, powerful blue water navy.  That navy would have no Russian-state interests to rush to the aid of, unlike the US needing to rush to Europe or SE Asian allies.

What Russia would really benefit from is a large & capable green water navy.  Their newer frigates are lethal, as are their newer submarines.  A healthy fleet of those, along with air assets - would, in my opinion, serve Russia far better.  It would be a better use of resources & give Russia  a robust capability to control situations along it's borders...which is where a lot of our current trouble spots are.


Let's not forget.  It's not Russian ships sailing in the islands off of BC, or parking themselves just outside of Canada's EEZ.  It's western ships sailing around the Baltic sea, etc.


Personally, I think Russia would be far better off building a robust & capable fleet for near it's own shores.  It doesn't need tons of subs prowling the Atlantic, ready to strike back against a nuclear onslaught by the US.  It does need the ability to assert it's own interests close to it's own borders, which I believe would actually really help normalize relations. 
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Offline Underway

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #826 on: November 14, 2018, 19:56:49 »
Depends on how you define blue water.  Russian needs to challenge NATO force projection.  This means going after aircraft carriers/subs, and pushing them out further and further from threatening Russia.  Which is why a "blue water" submarine fleet is a good idea.  As for a surface fleet Russia can do well with a smattering of heavy surface ships and a bunch of smaller vessels.  This is one of the reasons for the Syrian intervention.  They get access to a Med military port, pushing NATO even further away from Crimea and Ukraine on one axis and threatening the southern route into Russia.

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #827 on: November 15, 2018, 06:52:49 »
And they have there...interests...and...maybe not partners, but certainly people with similar interests, on the western side of the Pacific.
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Offline MilEME09

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #828 on: December 03, 2018, 21:09:42 »
Ukraine: Intercepted communications suggest Kremlin directed Azov Sea crisis
http://Http://amn.one/Sr4nCEd

Looks like this might be part of a bigger Russian game plan


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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #829 on: January 04, 2019, 14:21:18 »
Further to this post on hypersonic Avangard glide vehicle for ICMBs,
https://milnet.ca/forums/index.php/topic,111880.msg1551238.html#msg1551238

the latest (serious missile defence and arms control implications with coming hypersonic, Russian, Chinese and American):

Quote
Russia announces successful flight test of Avangard hypersonic glide vehicle

Russian President Vladimir Putin on 26 December 2018 announced a successful initial all-up flight test of the Avangard (Vanguard) hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV).

According to Putin, the Avangard HGV (previously designated Objekt 4202, Yu-71, and Yu-74) was launched from the Dombarovskoye missile base in the southern Ural Mountains, flew about 6,000 km, "manoeuvering horizontally and vertically at hypersonic speeds" and successfully engaged a simulated target at the Kura Range in Russia's Kamchatka peninsula.

"The Avangard has fully passed through its test program and will become operational on schedule. The weapon has fully confirmed its specifications," said Putin.

Developed by the NPO Mashinostroyenia Corporation and furnished with a solid propellant scramjet engine, Avangard has a claimed engagement speed of Mach 27 (32,202.36 kph). The HGV can reportedly be integrated as a multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicle (MIRV) with the Russian Strategic Rocket Forces' (Raketnye voyska strategicheskogo naznacheniya - RVSN) RS-18B/UR-100UTTKh SS-19 Mod 3 'Stiletto', R-36M2, and RS-28 Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) [emphasis added].

The Avangard system has already been integrated onto the UR-100UTTKh ICBM, according to Russian Security Council member, Sergei Ivanov. "We have several dozen brand new UR-100N UTTH ICBMs, with which the Avangard fits very well," he said. According to Ivanov, the new HGV also complies with the existing strategic arms reduction treaties, including the New START [emphasis added] (SNV-3).

RVSN Commander Colonel General Sergey Karakayev confirmed on 17 December 2018 that RVSN's Dombarovo Missile Division would receive the first Avangard HGVs integrated with the UR-100N UTTKh ICBMs in 2019. The UR-100N UTTH (SS-19 mod. 3 Stiletto) ICBM weighs 105.6 tonnes and carries a 4,350 kg payload. The baseline variant of the missile is fitted with six HGVs. Col Karakayev said the RVSN will stand up two missile regiments, each equipped with six Avangard systems by 2027 [emphasis added].


https://www.janes.com/article/85511/russia-announces-successful-flight-test-of-avangard-hypersonic-glide-vehicle

Mark
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Offline CloudCover

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #830 on: January 18, 2019, 09:32:51 »
Pair of SU- 34 collide mid air, some air crew rescued in Pacific: https://www.rt.com/russia/449092-su-34-collide-russia/

I thought these were crewed by 2 but it appears only one flyer per bird.
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #831 on: January 26, 2019, 12:13:04 »
The new nuclear capable missile violates 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty  INF. So whats a super power to do ? Cancel the treaty or build our own version ?


https://tinyurl.com/y92t4j9p
« Last Edit: January 26, 2019, 12:16:32 by tomahawk6 »

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #832 on: May 13, 2019, 16:52:36 »
New toy for Russian Special Forces and irregular troops everywhere: a captive piston "silent" mortar:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/the-russian-army-is-getting-e2-80-9csilent-e2-80-9d-mortars/ar-AABefJT

Quote
The Russian army is getting “silent” mortars
 Justin Rohrlich  2 days ago

Russian Army troops have begun taking delivery of advanced “silent” mortars, stealthy light artillery used by special commando units, Russia’s TASS news agency recently reported.

The 82mm 2B25 “Gull” mortar is manufactured by CRI Burevestnik, part of state-owned tank manufacturer UralVagonZavod. They are piston-launched, producing very little smoke or muzzle flash, and have a range of more than 1 km, or about six-tenths of a mile. Gull mortars are silent in the same way “bulletproof” vests are bulletproof: They aren’t, at least not 100% so. Picture a suppressed Kalashnikov rifle, only a lot bigger.

There are no other silent mortars on the market aside from the Gull, which Burevestnik says can fire 15 rounds per minute. Unnamed defense industry sources cited by TASS said a smaller 60mm version with a range of up to 4 km (2.5 miles) is in the works.

A Pentagon spokesperson declined to provide a statement, telling Quartz: “We don’t comment on matters of intelligence.”

The Gull “provides the advantage of concealed operation,” Burevestnik says in its marketing, explaining that it can be easily carried by one soldier. “All these advantages make the mortar attractive for Special Forces, especially in counter-terrorism operations.”

Sharon Burke, a former US assistant secretary of defense under the Obama administration, says the Gull could be useful for Russia given its “penchant for sneak attacks on neighbors with irregular forces, which the Russian government then denies responsibility for.”

“A long-range, large-caliber, stealthy and portable weapon would serve that end nicely,” says Burke, now a senior advisor to the New America Foundation.

The element of surprise

A regular mortar is not overwhelmingly loud to begin with; it produces a low thump that retired US Army colonel Jeff McCausland describes as something akin to a “cough.”

McCausland, a former Army War College dean who also commanded an artillery battalion during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, sees the Gull as a “not-insignificant improvement” over existing mortars. He says the Gull’s most important feature is the element of surprise.

“If they don’t hear you coming, you can just sit there and keep dropping shells down the tube till the barrel melts,” he tells Quartz. “You can pump out 15 rounds a minute from one of these things; you can do a good amount of damage.”

The Gull could also be a reliable moneymaker for Russia vis-a-vis overseas arms sales, McCausland believes. Countries like Sudan and DRC Congo “are all light infantry places, by and large, so selling it on the world market to folks like that is a distinct possibility,” he says.

Small systems like the Gull can be shipped easily, and should be simple for the Russians to get into the hands of various militaries and separatist groups without attracting much notice, explains former CIA military analyst Cindy Otis.

“Mortars are not what most people think of in terms of modern military technology,” she tells Quartz. “But they’re cost-effective, light, easily transportable, and adding a silencer is an extra plus.”
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline TIMMYO

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #833 on: May 14, 2019, 05:03:54 »
Russia should be somewhat wary. China isn't Europe. China won't enable Russia to kill the gas or oil not by any means once. Putin may as of now be shooting himself in the foot.

Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #834 on: June 20, 2019, 14:02:34 »
RUS has more ways to #$%^Y&*( up GPS - an overview here
Quote
A new investigative report* by the Russian independent media group “The Project” into luxury dachas owned by high-ranking government officials revealed that most all include GNSS jammers among their amenities. Attempts by the journalists to photograph the dachas from the air using drones were routinely foiled by jamming.

(…)

More @ link

* - Report in Russian
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Offline Journeyman

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #835 on: June 20, 2019, 14:23:34 »
RUS has more ways to #$%^Y&*( up GPS
Absolutely.  The US Centre for Defense Studies put out an excellent report in March 2019, "Above Us Only Stars: Exposing GPS Spoofing in Russia and Syria." LINK
They are routinely active in messing with GNSS for VIP/strategic facility protection, as well as active combat zones like Syria for airspace denial.

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #836 on: August 13, 2019, 11:49:41 »
Nuclear weapons arms control treaties--two detailed analyses by very serious Americans with extensive personal involvement in the subject:

Quote
Intermediate-Range Missiles Are the Wrong Weapon for Today’s Security Challenges
https://warontherocks.com/2019/08/intermediate-range-missiles-are-the-wrong-weapon-for-todays-security-challenges/

Bringing Russia’s New Nuclear Weapons Into New START [hypersonics: Avangard glide vehicle for ICBMs; Kinzhal air-launched ballistic missile for, say, Tu-22M3 bomber]
https://www.lawfareblog.com/bringing-russias-new-nuclear-weapons-new-start

Mark
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #837 on: September 30, 2019, 14:40:41 »
:tsktsk:
Quote
Several news outlets have reported that Russian special forces were seen entering the Svalbard archipelago and mainland Norway.

According to Aldrimer news outlet, sources in NATO and in Norwegian intelligence have reported that the Russian troops were studying the terrain and important infrastructure. The US has obtained satellite images depicting the Russian special forces troops in Norwegian territory.

Oslo said that the incident was related to Russia’s military exercise in the Barents Sea, during which Russia’s North Fleet approached Svalbard.
From Norwegian media source(original in Norwegian - Google Translate into English) …
Quote
Tactical groups of Russian special forces have been operating on Norwegian soil in recent days, both in Svalbard and mainland Norway. Special Forces Operators have performed reconnaissance against key objects and critical infrastructure. The operators have also deployed technical monitoring systems and sensor platforms …
Google English of entire Norwegian article here.
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Offline CloudCover

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #838 on: September 30, 2019, 15:17:27 »
Nyet. They are just playing their made for TV role: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupied
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #839 on: September 30, 2019, 16:01:24 »
Nyet. They are just playing their made for TV role: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupied
They're all on leave or just retired, right? ;) #UkraineNorth

Meanwhile, as someone smarter than me often says, don't believe it until the Kremlin denies it
Quote
Russia’s Embassy in Oslo has dismissed as a gross provocation a report published by a Norwegian media outlet that a Russian special ops unit was allegedly carrying out a mission in the kingdom, the Russian diplomatic mission said on its Facebook page on Monday.

"Information published in an article by Aldrimer.no on September 27, 2019 on alleged actions by a Russian special forces unit in Spitsbergen is fake news. We cannot call it otherwise than a gross provocation. We consider this publication as part and parcel of the ongoing systemic work carried out by certain circles in Norway on imposing an image of an enemy on Russia," the embassy said ...
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #840 on: September 30, 2019, 17:12:37 »
Aaaaand another Norwegian media outlet says "nope" (link in Norwegian) …
Quote
E-Service and PST: Nothing supporting allegations of Russian forces on Norwegian soil ...
Google English version here.
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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #841 on: December 12, 2019, 13:45:23 »
Interesting ...
Quote
Russia has not harassed U.S. ships and aircraft in Europe and the Mediterranean for the past three months in what appears to be an effort to avoid incidents that could escalate into conflict, NATO Supreme Commander Gen. Tod Wolters said Tuesday.

Russian aircraft still shadow U.S. and allied ships and planes, but "we have had zero unprofessional incidents at sea and zero unprofessional incidents in the sky" in the last 90 days, he said.

At a breakfast with defense reporters, Wolters attributed the decrease in unsafe operations by the Russians to the "deconfliction dialogue" he had in his first face-to-face meeting with Gen. Valery Gerasimov, chief of the Russian General Staff.

A NATO news release said the Wolters-Gerasimov talks took place in July in Baku, Azerbaijan.

Incidents in which Russian aircraft flew low over U.S. warships or made dangerous passes at American aircraft were "a key military topic in my consultations with Gen. Gerasimov," said Wolters, an Air Force general who doubles as head of U.S. European Command.

"He was concerned about it; I was concerned about it," he said, adding that the result of their talks was "zero unprofessional behavior that occurs in the maritime or in the air."

"The safety deconfliction has improved," Wolters said. "That's because we're deterring better, that's because we're deconflicting better" with upgrades to intelligence and surveillance assets ...
More @ link
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #842 on: December 16, 2019, 16:55:55 »
Russia hardly as down and out as some sometimes think--with rise and rise of China US not in such a great position--start of major piece:

Quote
Why Russian Military Expenditure Is Much Higher Than Commonly Understood (As Is China’s)

Gresham’s Law states that bad money drives out good money, but anyone who has spent time around Washington, D.C., knows that this law can safely be applied to information too — bad information tends to drive out good information. Such is the case with America’s assessments of other countries’ military and economic power. Defense spending is one of the most commonly used measures for gauging a country’s potential military power, setting expectations of what the military balance might look like in the future. It helps give us a sense of how much of a state’s economic power is being converted into military power. Well, in theory it should, if we knew how to measure it right, but comparing defense spending across countries is a complicated task. As a consequence, the United States doesn’t really know where its military expenditure stands in relation to that of its principal adversaries, what kind of military capability they’re getting for their money, and whether the balance of power is likely to improve or worsen over time.

Policymakers are barraged by a daily stream of think tank reports, academic writing, and media stories competing for their perceptions. For example, by cherry-picking a few gross measures, including military expenditure, a recent RAND report caricatured Russia as a weakling rogue state. Major newspapers generate erroneous headlines: many ran stories asserting that in 2017 Russian defense spending declined by a fifth . In our experience, both in Washington and London, decision-makers have little time to investigate or read and tend to believe many of the headlines they come across. Indeed, rarely does a discussion take place on Russia or China without a series of assumptions being voiced based on questionable assessments of relative power when it comes to GDP, defense spending, or demographics.

 
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Of course, a necessary precursor to finding measures that matter is knowing how to measure in the first place. This is a challenge we hope to briefly take up here. It is hardly an academic question. Strategic implications abound for America’s pursuit of a favorable regional military balance in Europe and decisive military advantages over its adversaries. In our view, despite its tremendous size, U.S. defense spending does not actually dwarf that of the rest of the world. This also raises some uncomfortable questions about the ability of the United States to attain deterrence by denial against competing revisionist powers. The disparity is especially evident when looking at the case of Russian military expenditure, which is much larger than it appears, though a fair assessment of Chinese defense spending would also yield pessimistic expectations about the future balance of military power.

Why Russia Gets More Bang for the Ruble

Based on the annual average dollar-to-ruble exchange rates, Russia is typically depicted as spending in the region of $60 billion per year on its military. This is roughly in line with the defense spending of medium-sized powers like the United Kingdom and France. However, anybody familiar with Russia’s military modernization program over the past decade will see the illogic: how can a military budget the size of the United Kingdom’s be used to maintain over a million personnel while simultaneously procuring vast quantities of capable military equipment?

Russian procurement dwarfs that of most European powers combined. Beyond delivering large quantities of weaponry for today’s forces, Russia’s scientists and research institutes are far along in development of hypersonic weapons, such as Tsirkon and Avangard, along with next-generation air defense systems like S-500. This volume of procurement and research and development should not be possible with a military budget ostensibly the same size as the United Kingdom’s. When theory checks in with practice, the problem with the approaches that return such answers is plain for anyone to see.

The reason for this apparent contradiction is that the use of market exchange rates grossly understates the real volume of Russian military expenditure (and that of other countries with smaller per-capita incomes, like China). Instead, any analysis of comparative military expenditure should be based on the use of purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates rather than market exchange rates. This alternative method takes differences in costs between countries into account. As we demonstrate, despite some shortcomings, PPP is a much more methodologically robust and defensible method of comparing defense spending across countries than the method of comparing spending using the market exchange rates that are commonly used by think tanks and academics. Using PPP, one finds that Russia’s effective military expenditure actually ranged between $150 billion and $180 billion annually over the last five years. That figure is conservative; taking into account hidden or obfuscated military expenditure, Russia may well come in at around $200 billion.

To put it simply, calculating Russian military expenditure based on purchasing power means that the United States spends only about four times more than Russia on defense, rather than ten times more when using market exchange rates. But this remains a crude comparison. The gap is even narrower when one digs into the differences in how this money is spent. At nearly 50 percent of federal budget spending on national defense, a large proportion of the Russian defense budget goes to procurement and research and development. By comparison, in other countries with large defense budgets, procurement spending tends to be much lower [emphasis added]: in India, the United States, and the United Kingdom, spending is at about 20–25 percent...

Michael Kofman is director and senior research scientist at CNA Corporation and a fellow at the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute. Previously he served as program manager at the National Defense University. The views expressed here are his own.

Richard Connolly is director of the Centre for Russian, European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Birmingham and senior lecturer in political economy. His research and teaching are principally concerned with the political economy of Russia and Eurasia.

https://warontherocks.com/2019/12/why-russian-military-expenditure-is-much-higher-than-commonly-understood-as-is-chinas/

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #843 on: December 27, 2019, 13:24:41 »
Boost-glide hypersonics operational on ICBMs says defence ministry, with nuclear weapons:

Quote
Russia deploys Avangard hypersonic missile system

Russia's first regiment of Avangard hypersonic missiles has been put into service, the defence ministry says.

The location was not given, although officials had earlier indicated they would be deployed in the Urals.

President Vladimir Putin has said the nuclear-capable missiles can travel more than 20 times the speed of sound and put Russia ahead of other nations.

They have a "glide system" that affords great manoeuvrability and could make them impossible to defend against.

Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu confirmed the "Avangard hypersonic glide vehicle entered service at 10:00 Moscow time on 27 December", calling it a "landmark event".

Mr Putin said on Tuesday the Avangard system could penetrate current and future missile defence systems, adding: "Not a single country possesses hypersonic weapons, let alone continental-range hypersonic weapons."

The West and other nations were "playing catch-up with us", he said.



It is hard to determine if Russia's new Avangard hypersonic missile system really has entered service, as Moscow claims, or if this is just an advanced phase of field testing. But President Putin's eagerness to claim bragging rights is to some extent justified. Russia looks to be ahead in the hypersonic stakes. China is also developing such systems; while the US appears to be somewhat behind.

Hypersonic missiles, as their name implies, fly very fast, at above Mach 5 - ie at least five times the speed of sound. Hypersonic weapons can take various forms. They can be cruise-type missiles, powered throughout their flight. Or, they can be carried aloft on board a ballistic missile from which the hypersonic "glide vehicle" separates and then flies to its target.

Such "boost-glide" systems, as they are known (Avangard appears to be one of these), are launched like a traditional ballistic missile, but instead of following an arc high above the atmosphere, the re-entry vehicle is put on a trajectory that allows it to enter Earth's atmosphere quite quickly, before gliding, un-powered, for hundreds or thousands of kilometres.

It is not so much the speed of the hypersonic weapon alone that counts. It is its extraordinary manoeuvrability as it glides towards its target. This poses a huge problem for existing anti-missile defence systems. Indeed the glide vehicle's trajectory, "surfing along the edge of the atmosphere" as one expert put it to me recently, presents any defensive system with additional problems. Thus, if Russia's claims are true, it has developed a long-range intercontinental missile system that may well be impossible to defend against.

The announcement that Avangard is operational heralds a new and dangerous era in the nuclear arms race. It confirms once again President Putin's focus on bolstering and modernising Russia's nuclear arsenal. It's indicative of the return of great power competition. Some analysts might well see Russia's development programme as a long-term strategy to cope with Washington's abiding interest in anti-missile defences. The US argument that these are purely designed to counter missiles from "rogue-states" like Iran or North Korea has carried little weight in Moscow.

This all comes at a time when the whole network of arms control agreements inherited from the Cold War is collapsing. One crucial treaty - the New START agreement - is due to expire in February 2021. Russia seems willing to extend the agreement but the Trump administration has so far appeared sceptical. With a whole new generation of nuclear weapons at the threshold of entering service, many believe not just that existing agreements should be bolstered, but that new treaties are needed to manage what could turn into a new nuclear arms race [emphasis added].
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-50927648

Mark
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Offline Black Sea Rover

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #844 on: January 30, 2020, 10:34:37 »
Interesting article: "Why we'll see more and more carriers on the high seas" (https://nationalpost.com/opinion/david-j-bercuson-why-well-see-more-and-more-carriers-on-the-high-seas).

My only concern, why didn't author mentioned Italian carrier. And why the word "second" was used in relation to Russian navy? As far as Russian navy is concerned it's rather 0.5 carrier. Admiral Kuznetsov belching and smoking like hell. If it was a horse, somebody would have shot it. While it takes russkies ten years to build a frigate, building a carrier would take them at best 12 years. By that time Kuznetsov carrier would be retired, and they risk to have several gap years without an operational carrier around 2030.

Offline mariomike

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #845 on: February 08, 2020, 11:02:32 »
In the news,

Quote
February 6, 2020

Pew Research Center

About a third of U.S. Republicans have confidence in Putin, up significantly since 2015
https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/02/07/russia-and-putin-receive-low-ratings-globally/ft_2020-02-07_russia_07/

Americans consistently have expressed little confidence in Russian President Vladimir Putin. But Republicans are now 21 points more likely than Democrats to express confidence in him (31% vs. 10%), the widest partisan gap in our polling.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2020, 11:35:26 by mariomike »

Offline OceanBonfire

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #846 on: March 03, 2020, 16:07:43 »
Quote
Russian frigate fires hypersonic missile for first time

A Russian Navy warship has fired an NPO Mashinostroyeniya 3M22 Zircon (Tsirkon) hypersonic missile for the first time during trials in the Barents Sea.

Russian defence minister Sergei Shoigu confirmed the start of the test programme by the Northern Fleet during a meeting of his ministry's board on 28 February.

"The trials of new armament, including hypersonic weapons, continue. All this will make it possible to qualitatively boost the combat potential of the Russian Navy's Northern and other fleets," Shoigu was reported as telling the board meeting by Russian state news agency TASS on 28 February.

The test launch was part of the Northern Fleet's plan of activity for 2019-25, said Shoigu.


https://www.janes.com/article/94629/russian-frigate-fires-hypersonic-missile-for-first-time
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Russia in the 21st Century [Superthread]
« Reply #847 on: March 05, 2020, 14:54:50 »
From a while back, but just popped into my RSS feed -- another tool in Russia's tool belt ...
Quote
ABSTRACT

While the Night Wolves Motorcycle Club's (NWMC) roots are similar to Western counterparts such as the Hells Angels MC and Bandidos MC, they have evolved into a proxy of the Russian state who unite combat-ready diasporas. The NWMC nongovernmental organization provides soft propaganda while they operate alongside the Russian military and imbed military tactics into foreign Russian populations through their corporate entity Wolf Holding of Security Structures. This case study explores the evolution from outlaw motorcycle club to political force and their integration into Russia's information operations and conflict. The NWMC activities in Eastern Europe, particularly Ukraine, highlight how this motorcycle club has been able to cultivate a fifth column to agitate domestic politics and increase ties to the Kremlin.
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