Author Topic: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread  (Read 243758 times)

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Offline Thucydides

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #225 on: August 29, 2014, 17:11:05 »
An analysis of using political and economic power to put some existing military muscle in the region to work against the IS. Doubtful if this administration will do so, but the idea of various regional powers directly intervening isn't off the table, since they have some pretty clear existential issues with allowing the IS to remain in place regardless of US actions:

http://thefederalist.com/2014/08/25/if-you-want-to-stop-isis-here-is-what-it-will-take/

Quote
If You Want To Stop ISIS, Here Is What It Will Take
Killing the Islamic State requires neither more nor less than waging war
 
By Angelo Codevilla
AUGUST 25, 2014

The Islamic State’ video-dissemination of one of its goons beheading an American is an existential challenge from which we cannot afford to shrink. Until the Islamic State (ISIS/ISIL/IS) did that, it made sense for the U.S. government to help contain it because the Islamic world, which the IS threatens most directly, must destroy it sooner or later. But internetting that beheading was a gory declaration of America’s impotence—a dare-by-deed that is sure to move countless young persons around the globe to get in on killing us, anywhere they can. The longer the Islamic State survives, the more will take up its dare. Either we kill the IS, or we will deserve the wave of terrorism that will engulf us.

Killing the IS requires neither more nor less than waging war—not as the former administration waged its “war on terror,” nor by the current administration’s pinpricks, nor according to the too-clever-by-half stratagems taught in today’s politically correct military war colleges, but rather by war in the dictionary meaning of the word. To make war is to kill the spirit as well as the body of the enemy, so terribly as to make sure that it will not rise again, and that nobody will want to imitate it.

That requires first isolating the Islamic State politically and physically to deprive all within it of the capacity to make war, and even to eat. Then it requires killing all who bear arms and all who are near them.

Why It’s Now Our Business

The Islamic State is a lot more than a bunch of religious extremists. Its diverse composition as well as its friends and enemies in the region define its strength and its vulnerabilities. Its dependence on outside resources, its proximity to countries with the capacity and incentive to strike serious blows, and its desert location, make its destruction possible with little U.S. involvement on the ground, and providing the United States uses its economic and diplomatic power in a decisive manner.

It would have been better for America not to have taken sides in that region’s reshuffling, or to have done so decisively in a manner that commanded respect.

Geopolitically, the creation of a Sunni Arab state in western Mesopotamia should not be any of America’s business. For a thousand years, Sunni Assyrian Arabs from the northwest have fought for exclusive control of that area, against countervailing pressure from Shia Persians from the southeast and their Arab co-religionists. All the while, Kurds held fast to their northern mountains. In recent centuries, the Ottoman Empire arbitrated that ancient contest. In 1801, Sunni Wahabis from the Saudi clan invaded present-day Iraq and inflicted horrors that surpass even today’s. In response, the Ottomans nearly wiped out the Saudis and tortured the Wahabi leaders in the main cities of the empire. It would have been better for America not to have taken sides in that region’s reshuffling, or to have done so decisively in a manner that commanded respect. Alas, U.S. administrations of both parties intervened fecklessly. We are reaping the results.

Now one of the parties to the struggle is making itself our business, and is doing so globally. We have to mind that business.

How to Command Respect Again

To kill IS, take note of its makeup: Sunni Wahabis from Saudi Arabia and the Gulf, Syrian Sunnis who rebelled against the Alewite regime of the Assad family, the Naqshbandi army constituted by the Ba’athist cadre of Saddam Hussein’s army and security services that fled to Syria in 2003, that ran the war against the U.S. occupation, and that now runs the IS military, plus assorted jihadis from around the world including the United States and Western Europe.

Breaking the hold of ISIS on the people it now rules will require a rude ‘awakening.’

Note, as well, that the IS did not have to exert much power to conquer Sunni majority areas in either former Syria or former Iraq. The people there want to be ruled by Sunni, unless they are given a compelling reason to accept something else. In former Iraq, the local Sunni tribes supported the Sunni Ba’athists’ fight against the Americans until, in 2006, the Shia death squads slaughtered them in such numbers as to lead these tribes to beg for a deal with the Americans. What the American spinners called “the Sunni awakening” resulted from the reality of imminent Sunni mass death. Breaking the hold of the IS on the people it now rules will require a similarly rude “awakening.”

Note the material sources of the Islamic State’s power: supplies from and through Turkey’s Muslim Brotherhood government, paid for largely with money from notables in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf, as well as from the government of Qatar. Beyond religious sectarianism, the motivation for this support is the Qataris’ and the Turks’ foreign policy seemingly based on promotion of Sunni political Islam wherever possible.

The first strike against the IS must be aimed at its sources of material support. Turkey and Qatar are very much part of the global economy—one arena where the U.S. government has enormous power, should it decide to use it. If and when—a key if—the United States decides to kill the IS, it can simply inform Turkey, Qatar, and the world it will have zero economic dealings with these countries and with any country that has any economic dealing with them, unless these countries cease any and all relations with the IS. This un-bloody step—no different from the economic warfare the United States waged in World War II—is both essential and the touchstone of seriousness. Deprived of money to pay for “stuff” and the Turkish pipeline for that stuff, the IS would start to go hungry, lose easy enthusiasm, and wear out its welcome.

Next, the Air War

Striking at the state’s belly would also be one of the objectives of the massive air campaign that the U.S. government could and should orchestrate. “Orchestrate.” Not primarily wage.

Saudi Arabia has some 300 U.S. F-15 fighter planes plus another hundred or so modern combat aircraft, with bases that can be used conveniently for strikes against the IS. Because Saudi Arabia is key to the IS’s existence, to any campaign to destroy it, and to any U.S. decision regarding such a campaign, a word about the Saudi role is essential.

Wahabism validates the Saudis’ Islamic purity while rich Saudis live dissolute lives—a mutually rewarding, but tenuous deal for all.
The IS ideology is neither more nor less than that of the Wahabi sect, which is the official religion of Saudi Arabia, which has been intertwined with its royal family since the eighteenth century, and which Saudi money has made arguably the most pervasive version of Islam in the world (including the United States). Wahabism validates the Saudis’ Islamic purity while rich Saudis live dissolute lives—a mutually rewarding, but tenuous deal for all. But increasingly, the Saudi royals have realized they are riding a tiger. Wahabi-educated youth are seeing the royals for what they are. The IS, by declaring itself a Caliphate, explicitly challenged the Saudis’ legitimacy. The kingdom’s Grand Mufti, a descendant of Ab al Wahab himself, declared the IS an enemy of Islam. But while the kingdom officially forbids its subjects from joining IS, its ties with Wahabism are such that it would take an awful lot to make the kingdom wage war against it.

American diplomacy’s task is precisely to supply that awful lot.

Given enough willpower, America has enough leverage to cause the Saudis to fight in their own interest. Without American technicians and spare parts, the Saudi arsenal is useless. Nor does Saudi Arabia have an alternative to American protection. If a really hard push were required, the U.S. government might begin to establish relations with the Shia tribes that inhabit the oil regions of eastern Arabia.

Day after day after day, hundreds of Saudi (and Jordanian) fighters, directed by American AWACS radar planes, could systematically destroy the Islamic State—literally anything of value to military or even to civil life. It is essential to keep in mind that the Islamic State exists in a desert region which offers no place to hide and where clear skies permit constant, pitiless bombing and strafing. These militaries do not have the excessive aversions to collateral damage that Americans have imposed upon themselves.

Destruction from the air, of course, is never enough. Once the Shia death squads see their enemy disarmed and hungry, the United States probably would not have to do anything for the main engine of massive killing to descend on the Islamic State and finish it off. U.S. special forces would serve primarily to hunt down and kill whatever jihadists seemed to be escaping the general disaster of their kind.

That would be war—a war waged by a people with whom nobody would want to mess. Many readers are likely to comment: “but we’re not going to do anything like that.” They may be correct. In which case, the consequences are all too predictable.

Angelo M. Codevilla is a fellow of the Claremont Institute, professor emeritus of international relations at Boston University and the author of To Make And Keep Peace, Hoover Institution Press, 2014.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #226 on: August 31, 2014, 10:27:07 »
For those here who denigrated Maliki's US-trained Iraqi Army for losing the first major battles against ISIS, it seems the Iraqi Army actually starting to make some headway against ISIS now:

Military.com

Quote
Iraqi Forces Break Militant Siege of Shiite Town

Associated Press | Aug 31, 2014 | by Sinan Salaheddin

Iraqi security forces and Shiite militiamen on Sunday broke a six-week siege imposed by the Islamic State extremist group on the northern Shiite Turkmen town of Amirli, following U.S. airstrikes against the Sunni militants' positions, officials said.

Iraq Army spokesman Lt. Gen. Qassim al-Moussawi said the operation started at dawn Sunday and the forces entered the town shortly after midday.
Speaking live on state TV, al-Moussawi said the forces suffered "some causalities," but did not give a specific number. He said fighting was "still ongoing to clear the surrounding villages."

(...EDITED)

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Offline Humphrey Bogart

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #227 on: August 31, 2014, 10:46:42 »
For those here who denigrated Maliki's US-trained Iraqi Army for losing the first major battles against ISIS, it seems the Iraqi Army actually starting to make some headway against ISIS now:

Military.com

It was only a matter of time.... Speaking of which!



When can I start wearing a fedora in uniform???  This guy is my new hero, bringing style to the battlefield, one dead jihadi at a time!

Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #228 on: August 31, 2014, 11:08:24 »
The Turkmen were rescued by a combined force of Iraqi Army,Kurds,Shiaa militias[read IRG],US airpower and probably TF Black assets.

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #229 on: August 31, 2014, 21:08:17 »
No German-made vehicles for the Kurds then? 

Shanghai Daily/Xinhua


Quote
Germany decides to deliver arms to Iraq

BERLIN, Aug. 31 (Xinhua) -- Germany decided on Sunday to provide anti-tank missiles and machine guns to the Kurds in northern Iraq to support the fight against the Islamic State (IS), German media reported.

The decision was made after a meeting attended by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier and Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen.

Germany will send 16,000 assault rifles, 40 machine guns, 240 bazookas, 500 anti-tank missiles and 10,000 hand grenades to the Kurds, said a statement by the German Ministry of Defence.

(...EDITED)
« Last Edit: August 31, 2014, 21:12:03 by S.M.A. »
Our Country
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #230 on: September 02, 2014, 11:12:12 »
It was only a matter of time.... Speaking of which!



When can I start wearing a fedora in uniform???  This guy is my new hero, bringing style to the battlefield, one dead jihadi at a time!

Love the NC Star laser over top of the scope. I await NC Star booth at SHOT stating; "Combat Proven hardware"

Offline Infantryman2b

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #231 on: September 02, 2014, 14:37:46 »
http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/09/02/isis-releases-video-purportedly-showing-execution-of-american-journalist-steven-sotloff/

Steven Sotlof was reported to have been beheaded by the same masked ISIS militant. Another threat has been made that a Briton named David Cawthorne Haines will be the next to be executed if the airstrikes dont stop. ISIS isn't backing down and continue to grow stronger and bolder. Large scale conflict will eventually take place if we want to stop this group from forming a large hostile state capable of launching large scale attacks on the homefront and in the middle east.

Offline ShadyBrah

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #232 on: September 02, 2014, 15:09:21 »
If we don't go get them, they will come get us. It's obvious at this point that there isn't a diplomatic solution, and relying on the problem to solve itself is just stupid.

Our armed forces are for the protection of our country and our interests, but that doesn't mean we have to wait for the threat to come to our front door before blasting them away..

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #233 on: September 02, 2014, 17:42:12 »
Amnesty International is now braying that ISIS are conducting industrial scale ethnic cleansing.  No sh1t Sherlock. 

Now that AI is blowing the whistle on the gig, I am sure that ISIS will cut it out and behave.   :sarcasm:

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #234 on: September 02, 2014, 18:46:27 »
An article to add to what was said in the above post:

Quote
Business Insider

New Report Details The Horrific 'Ethnic Cleansing' By ISIS In Iraq

On Aug. 15, extremists from the group calling itself the Islamic State (ISIS or ISIL) forced Elias Salah, a 59-year-old nurse, and about 20 others into the back of a Kia pickup truck in the Iraqi village of Kocho. The passengers were grouped into a tight cluster and photographed.

And then, backs turned, they were shot. Salah was hit in the left leg, falling forward. He immediately played dead, waited until the group from ISIS left, and fled the area.

(...SNIPPED)

In its report, Amnesty portrays stories like Salah's as one of many horrors committed by ISIS, the group that brutally executed American journalist James Foley last month. Beginning in June, ISIS made sweeping advances to gain control of large areas in northern and western Iraq.

Since then, according to Amnesty, ISIS has since only June "targeted non-Arab and non-Sunni Muslim communities" indiscriminately, killing or abducting hundreds and possibly thousands. And at least 830,000 others have been forced to flee in the face of the group.

"The massacres and abductions being carried out by the Islamic State provide harrowing new evidence that a wave of ethnic cleansing against minorities is sweeping across northern Iraq,"
said Donatella Rovera, the author of the report.

(...EDITED)

What happened next, as he relayed to Amnesty, has become all too familiar. ISIS took the villagers to the edge of a hill and told them to convert to Islam. When they didn't, the militants opened fire.

(...END EXCERPT)

« Last Edit: September 02, 2014, 18:49:38 by S.M.A. »
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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Offline cupper

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #235 on: September 02, 2014, 19:44:03 »
If we don't go get them, they will come get us. It's obvious at this point that there isn't a diplomatic solution, and relying on the problem to solve itself is just stupid.

Our armed forces are for the protection of our country and our interests, but that doesn't mean we have to wait for the threat to come to our front door before blasting them away..

And what would you propose that our (or any other) armed forces do that isn't being done already?
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

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Let's Go CAPS!

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #236 on: September 02, 2014, 21:17:41 »
The problem will be, whoever fights them, what do you do if some surrender or attempt to surrender? Multiple problems to be solved.
Never Congratulate Yourself In Victory, Nor Blame Your Horses In Defeat - Old Cossack Expression

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #237 on: September 03, 2014, 03:01:22 »
From wearing fedoras on patrol to wearing bandanas on APCs...



Iraqi soldiers wave to a humanitarian aid convoy en route to Amerli on Sept. 1 after Iraqi forces broke through to the jihadist-besieged Shiite town the previous day. (JM Lopez / AFP)

White House: 350 More US Troops Heading to Iraq

[defense news] - Sep. 2, 2014

Quote
President Obama has approved sending roughly 350 more US troops to Iraq, the White House announced on Tuesday.

The new troops will protect US diplomatic facilities and personnel in Baghdad, allowing some US troops already in Iraq to leave, according to a statement from the White House press secretary.

“These additional forces will not serve in a combat role,” the statement says.

Troop numbers in Iraq fluctuate, so although 763 US troops are on the ground now, that number will change by the time the additional 350 troops arrive, according to the Defense Department.
Our Country
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #238 on: September 03, 2014, 09:29:10 »
This deployment will increase the number of US troops to 1000.The 22d MEU has been extended in the AO 3 weeks.

http://www.armytimes.com/article/20140902/NEWS/309020059/22nd-MEU-deployment-extension-unlikely-change-Marines-op-tempo-much-remains-flux

The 21-day extension of the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit is unlikely to affect the deployment schedule for other MEUs, Marine officials tell Marine Corps Times.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the Camp Lejeune, North Carolina-based 22nd MEU, deployed with the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group, to remain at its current location in the 5th Fleet area, near the Persian Gulf, until the beginning of October, according to an Aug. 30 announcement from the Navy.

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #239 on: September 03, 2014, 12:42:00 »
T6. FOX News is reporting 1,213 with the additional 350 tasked to protect US diplomatic facilities and personnel in Baghdad.

Here is the latest from the "leader" of the free world:

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/09/03/conflicting-signals-obama-vows-to-destroy-isis-make-it-manageable/

OBAMA: 'Degrade and destroy' ISIS
— but let's keep it 'manageable'


PRESIDENT OBAMA SENDS seemingly conflicting signals Wednesday about his ultimate goal in the fight against ISIS — after the group released a video showing the beheading of an American journalist Steve Sotloff, inset — saying at a press conference in Europe that the aim is to 'degrade and destroy' the terror group — but moments later, claiming he wants to make it a 'manageable problem.'
« Last Edit: September 04, 2014, 11:52:01 by Rifleman62 »
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #240 on: September 03, 2014, 13:02:52 »
Maybe its my fuzzy math,but the numbers are fluctuating. ;)

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #241 on: September 05, 2014, 08:28:53 »
Now Canada is going to be sending some advisors....


Link

From the link, this line caught my eye:

Quote
"Obviously I think that's a red line for everybody here: no boots on the ground," (Kerry) said.​

It's only my opinion, but if our key deciding factor is whether or not we have "boots on the ground", then we are bound to fail, because the other side has absolutely no qualms about having boots on the ground, and that, my friends, is necessary to win wars.

So, there I was....

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #242 on: September 05, 2014, 08:44:21 »
Good. Decapitating the ISIS leadership one by one.

NBC news

Quote
Aide to ISIS Leader Among 3 Killed in U.S. Strike: Iraqi Official

Three senior members of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) - including an aide to its leader - were killed in a U.S. airstrike in Iraq, a senior Iraqi security official told NBC News Thursday. The strike on the ISIS stronghold of Mosul killed Abu Hajar Al-Sufi, an aide to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, as well as an explosives operative and the military leader of nearby Tel Afar, the source said on condition of anonymity. Al Arabiya cited the Iraqi Defense Ministry saying Baghdadi's aide had been killed.

Pentagon Spokesman Col. Steve Warren could not confirm the deaths and said ISIS leaders had not been targeted. But he added that if ISIS leaders were embedded "inside troop formations they are likely to be killed." The U.S. has been carrying out airstrikes across the country's north after the brutal terror group gained ground in a murderous sweep in June. The U.S. and the West have stepped up their rhetoric against the group after what Obama's opponents said was a slow start in articulating a solution to the crisis.

(...EDITED)

Our Country
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
- Winston Churchill

Offline cryco

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #243 on: September 05, 2014, 09:04:05 »

Good luck to those going

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #244 on: September 05, 2014, 17:02:15 »
It's only my opinion, but if our key deciding factor is whether or not we have "boots on the ground", then we are bound to fail, because the other side has absolutely no qualms about having boots on the ground, and that, my friends, is necessary to win wars.

No US or Western boots.  Boots from people who live in the neighbourhood and have the most to lose?  Absolutely.
"The higher the rank, the more necessary it is that boldness should be accompanied by a reflective mind....for with increase in rank it becomes always a matter less of self-sacrifice and more a matter of the preservation of others, and the good of the whole."

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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #245 on: September 05, 2014, 17:06:41 »
No US or Western boots.  Boots from people who live in the neighbourhood and have the most to lose?  Absolutely.

Does that include "deniable" boots and "PSCs"?  Or are we just talking about uniformed combatants?

Just askin'.  :)
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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #246 on: September 05, 2014, 18:44:34 »
Good. Decapitating the ISIS leadership one by one.
Yes, working through the High-Value Target Capture/Kill list failed miserably in Afghanistan; I'm sure it will work out brilliantly this time though.   :nod:



[Opinions / Informed opinions]  :not-again:

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #247 on: September 05, 2014, 22:19:22 »
Some strange bedfellows in the fight against ISIS in Iraq:

Huffington Post

Quote
The Shadowy Iranian General Who's Fighting 'With The US' Against Islamic State
The Huffington Post UK    | By Jack Sommers

 

The most powerful man in the Middle East you have never heard is on the frontline in Iraq fighting Islamic State (IS) - which is remarkable, and not just because he's 57.

The Iranian military mastermind Qassem Suleimani, who remains virtually unknown outside the region, has been photographed in Iraq with those fighting the Sunni militants of IS.

Suleimani commands the elite Quds Force, which is part of Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and helps Tehran wage covert operations abroad. Fighters from the Quds Force are believed to have already played a key role in boosting Bashar al Assad's government forces in next-door Syria by engaging in combat with various Syrian rebel groups - including IS.

In a supreme irony, common in the Middle East of late, Suleimani is officially designated a terrorist by the US government - but is now fighting a terrorist group that has murdered at least two US citizens - James Foley and Steven Sotloff - and has been bombed by the US air force.

This image surfaced on Twitter on Tuesday and is believed to show the shadowy Iranian general on the ground in Amerli, the northern Iraqi town besieged by IS for two months until it was routed by Iraqi forces earlier this week, with the assistance of US air strikes. The town is not far from the Iranian border.

  

The war against IS have set the stage for the the United States and Iran to become unlikely allies - 12 years after George W Bush included the country in his "axis of evil".

In a long New Yorker profile last year, Suleimani was dubbed "the Shadow Commander" for his role in Middle East wars and regional politics.

His influence in Iraq has been so great, he has previously been accused of "secretly running" the country.

Our Country
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
-------------------------------------------
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
- Winston Churchill

Offline Kilo_302

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #248 on: September 06, 2014, 04:12:52 »
Iran was eager to help the US during the opening phases of Enduring Freedom as well. They provided much of the HUMINT for US forces in the first few months, as Iran had had an intelligence presence on the ground for some time (they weren't fans of the Taliban either). George W. was so grateful he included Iran in the famous "Axis of Evil" State of the Union speech in early January 2002. That move has got to be one of the biggest foreign policy blunders of the decade, as 18 months later the US was on the ground in Iraq fighting a growing insurgency that was supported by Iran. A genuine warming of relations between the two could have potentially made post-war Iraq a far easier situation to deal with.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #249 on: September 07, 2014, 11:45:05 »
A hint of things to come?

Military.com

Quote
US Expands ISIL Airstrikes Closer to Syria Border

Associated Press | Sep 07, 2014 | by Lolita Baldor
TBILISI, Georgia -- The U.S. military said Sunday it launched airstrikes around Haditha Dam in western Iraq, targeting Islamic State insurgents there for the first time in a move to prevent the group from capturing the vital dam.

The strikes represented a broadening of the U.S. campaign against the Islamic State militants, moving the military operations closer to the border of Syria, where the group also has been operating.

Speaking in Georgia where he's meeting with government and defense officials, U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that if the dam were to fall into the militant's hands "or if that dam would be destroyed, the damage that that would cause would be very significant and it would put a significant additional and big risk into the mix in Iraq" including U.S. interests there.

(...EDITED)

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