Author Topic: On Political Correctness  (Read 14244 times)

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #75 on: October 14, 2018, 23:31:56 »
A thought on Political Correctness, drawn from a personal anecdote.

After I graduated from Bible College with my bachelor's degree in Religious Education, my family held something of a celebration of the fact. Beyond several members of my extended family, we had invited a number of my friends to high school. One such friend (whom I am happily no longer in contact with as a result) brought his girlfriend along. I'd met her before, so I didn't particularly mind. I wasn't entirely fond with her because something about her raised several warning flags, and it didn't take very long for me to gain an understanding of why.

My mother's father passed away in 1999 from cancer, and as he had spent his retirement as a carpenter, made many different objects - including the candy bowl sitting next to me at this moment. One such object was a piece of Christian iconography, which were three crosses joined together in a single piece. As he wasn't the most emotional person, it was difficult for him to speak with affection to anyone. But he was a man of a deep and real faith, so he had made five of these crosses, one for each of his children (the one he made for my grandmother is slightly different), as a symbol both of his love for his children, and his hope that they would have as deep a faith as his own - even if they did not hold the same beliefs.

The barbecue and event was going quite well to my eyes, so I didn't learn of this incident until some time had passed, but apparently the girlfriend took objection to the open display of this piece of art, and effectively demanded my mother remove it from her sight. My mother quite wisely refused, and they left rather rapidly shortly there after. I'm significantly understating things when I merely say that she took objection to this piece being visible. I have many friends with a variety of beliefs, including someone best described as a pagan priestess. All of them recognize a little thing called the sacredness of hospitality, of which this event was a remarkable violation.

A mutual friend later asked why I was no longer in contact with this particular couple, so I informed him of this particular matter. While he was at the same celebration, he was not aware that this had occurred. His simple response was a horrified expletive, to put mildly, because you just don't do that. Her hatred for even the slightest indication of Christian belief is still something I can't wrap my head around, because her personal past meant that she could look upon this symbol of a father's love for his children and be sufficiently offended that she demanded it be removed.

A lot of the troubles around certain hot-button disputes strike me as being ultimately the same thing in function - the projection of one's negative experiences into the assumed motivations of those one disagrees with. In all honesty, this is why I'm proud to have had someone tell me that they figured I would be offended if they suggested that I was trustworthy. Not because I'm a duplicitous individual, but because he was acknowledging that he could not accurately determine my motivations and reasons. In other words, he acknowledged that I was an inherently honest individual because I was very much like the fabled scorpion - he could not be certain that I would act in a fashion that would be beneficial to him, but he knew with certainty that I would always act in a fashion that was consistent with my own nature and character.

I extend the concept of hospitality being sacred to go beyond one's domicile, and include things like one's sense of self and intrinsic being. After all, if one does not feel at home inside one's own mind, one is in very dire circumstances indeed. I hold nothing to be more important on the personal level than the sanctity of one's own mind. How threatened must one feel when basic social interaction with someone who has a different background is determined to be inherently dangerous?

I put it this way - the problem with political correctness is neatly illustrated in the film The Hunt for Red October - isn't the Political Officer the first person murdered?

I'm not a religious guy, except when I swear, but I once dealt with an issue like this by signing up the offending party for a subscription to this magazine:

https://www.jw.org/en/publications/magazines/

Feel free to poach my idea... :)
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Navy_Wannabe

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #76 on: October 15, 2018, 12:00:56 »
^ pure savagery

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #77 on: October 15, 2018, 12:11:19 »
^ pure savagery
Yes, it's one of his positive attributes.   :nod:

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #78 on: October 16, 2018, 09:27:43 »
An interesting article - I am definitely in the Exhausted Majority camp...

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/we-need-the-exhausted-majority-to-speak-up/2018/10/15/160440fa-d090-11e8-83d6-291fcead2ab1_story.html?utm_term=.f944d4a97f0d

Quote
We’re staying silent out of fear
 
An activist wears tape on her mouth while protesting in San Francisco on Oct. 4. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

By Charles Lane
Opinion writer
October 15 at 6:51 PM

Most ordinary people found it unbearable to live under communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. The reasons varied: shortages of consumer goods, incessant propaganda, restrictions on travel.

Nothing was more psychologically exhausting than the constant pressure to watch every word one said, and to pretend to believe things one did not, for fear of negative repercussions. Dissidents called this “double morality” or “double consciousness.” It drove people crazy. Actually, it drove some to suicide.

Only among trusted family and friends was it possible to speak one’s mind, yet even that was not guaranteed. Of all aspects of totalitarian life, citizens of the former Eastern Bloc say, this is the hardest to explain to those who grew up in the democratic West.

Until now, perhaps. A new study of political attitudes in the United States offers stunning evidence that most Americans censor themselves, except among people they regard as like-minded, on a bundle of sensitive topics: immigration and immigrants; race and racism; gay, lesbian and gender issues; and Islam and Muslims.

The report by More in Common, a new nonprofit dedicated to understanding and healing political polarization in the United States and Europe, is based on a nationwide survey of nearly 8,000 people conducted this past December and January.

It found that between 51 and 66 percent of Americans agree there is “pressure to think a certain way about” each of the aforementioned topics, with immigration seen as the least sensitive and Islam the most.

Meanwhile, 68 percent report that “it is acceptable for me to express what I think” about race, or Islam, only among “people who are like me.” On immigration, 73 percent feel that way; on gay, lesbian and gender issues, the figure is 70 percent.

Political freedom has never been absolute in the United States, to be sure. For much if not most of our history, ostracism or worse awaited advocates of racial equality, especially in the South. If anyone understands the oppressiveness of being forced to present a false front every day, it would be the American gay men and lesbians who grew up in the era of the closet.

Conversely, a certain measure of self-censorship is necessary to democracy; to the extent that people refrain from gratuitously broadcasting bigotry, it promotes trust and rational discourse.

For all that, the More in Common report confronts us with a disturbing reality. We are a long way from the “double morality” of Eastern Europe, but we are, apparently, living among many millions of citizens who routinely lie or dissemble about their political opinions out of fear.

And what do they fear? Not necessarily government repression, the report suggests, but ridicule and harassment from their fellow citizens, which is often magnified by social media and can sometimes lead to trouble at school or work.

Large majorities of the public — 80 percent or more — see both hate speech and political correctness as problems plaguing American politics.

Defiance of the latter fueled Donald Trump’s electoral rise. Outrage at the former fuels the anti-Trump resistance.

Under communism, members of the party had to watch their words and deeds as much or more than other citizens did.

In the United States today, right- and left-wing tribes — Progressive Activists and Devoted Conservatives, as the More in Common report designates them — enforce “core beliefs” within their own ranks. A quarter to a third of Americans feel pressure to “think a certain way” about controversial issues even among people like themselves, according to the report.

Among progressives, more men than women felt pressure to conform; among conservatives, more women than men did.

With these less-than-tolerant ideological factions dominating everything from town hall meetings to Twitter, the far larger percentage of Americans who do see nuances, and who do favor policy compromise, keep their heads down.

They now constitute what the report describes as an Exhausted Majority, consisting of about two-thirds of the electorate. And 65 percent of the Exhausted Majority agree with the statement “people I agree with politically need to be willing to listen to others and compromise.” Yet their views are not reflected in political discourse, they believe.

They’re right: According to the report, the progressive and conservative ideologues who dominate Democratic and Republican party politics are 14 points more likely than the Exhausted Majority to believe that “people I agree with politically need to stick to their beliefs and fight.”

For the time being, the president of the United States is openly sowing fear and anger for political gain in the 2018 midterm elections, and his Democratic Party opponents seem increasingly tempted to respond in kind. Hope for more decent and, indeed, freer politics lies in the possibility that members of the Exhausted Majority will wake up and raise their voices.
"The higher the rank, the more necessary it is that boldness should be accompanied by a reflective mind....for with increase in rank it becomes always a matter less of self-sacrifice and more a matter of the preservation of others, and the good of the whole."

Karl von Clausewitz

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #79 on: October 16, 2018, 09:54:41 »
An interesting article -
Anyone disbelieving the premise of the article, just read the comments that follow.  Déjà vu.

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #80 on: October 16, 2018, 10:17:50 »
A balanced article, right up to the second last sentence. It would have been stronger without it.
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats. (H.L. Mencken 1919)
Zero tolerance is the politics of the lazy. All it requires is that you do nothing and ban everything.

Offline Furniture

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #81 on: October 16, 2018, 10:25:26 »
Anyone disbelieving the premise of the article, just read the comments that follow.  Déjà vu.

It's almost as though many read the article looking for something they could use to discredit it as being written by "Russian trolls", or "NPCs" rather than hoisting in the message.


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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #82 on: October 16, 2018, 15:22:08 »
It's almost as though many read the article looking for something they could use to discredit it as being written by "Russian trolls", or "NPCs" rather than hoisting in the message.

And so it follows that reading the comments is often counter-productive, as the posters tend to follow their confirmation bias, and if one is not careful, reading the comments may taint one's own perception of the actual article itself.
"The higher the rank, the more necessary it is that boldness should be accompanied by a reflective mind....for with increase in rank it becomes always a matter less of self-sacrifice and more a matter of the preservation of others, and the good of the whole."

Karl von Clausewitz

Offline Brad Sallows

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #83 on: October 20, 2018, 21:27:16 »
Tyler Cowen, writing for Bloomberg, has some thoughts about PC - that it is not helping "the left" the way some think it might.
That which does not kill me has made a grave tactical error.

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Despair is a sin.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #84 on: October 21, 2018, 11:12:54 »
COLONEL TIM COLLINS: How can our chubby, drug-addled and right-on Army protect us from our enemies?

Instead of imposing stricter discipline, it has put 96 soldiers on diet pills, while eight have been given liposuction. This lame official response tells you all you need to know: the British Army has been infected with the crippling disease of political correctness.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-6299067/COLONEL-TIM-COLLINS-chubby-drug-addled-right-Army-protect-enemies.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline AbdullahD

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #85 on: October 21, 2018, 14:54:44 »
COLONEL TIM COLLINS: How can our chubby, drug-addled and right-on Army protect us from our enemies?

Instead of imposing stricter discipline, it has put 96 soldiers on diet pills, while eight have been given liposuction. This lame official response tells you all you need to know: the British Army has been infected with the crippling disease of political correctness.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-6299067/COLONEL-TIM-COLLINS-chubby-drug-addled-right-Army-protect-enemies.html

That was eye opening and I am a big lad too.. but to be big and in the armed forces defending the country it just seems like a constructive way to commit suicide.

Abdullah

Offline Colin P

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #86 on: October 21, 2018, 14:57:31 »
Put all the fat soldiers on point, so they can provide cover for the fit ones in the back....

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #87 on: October 21, 2018, 22:21:17 »
That was eye opening and I am a big lad too.. but to be big and in the armed forces defending the country it just seems like a constructive way to commit suicide.

Abdullah

I dunno... back in my day there were always a few chubbies kicking around too. If for no other reason than a formal excuse to kick them out, these new, easier but universal 'FORCE' type tests are a good idea.

And there's no moral outrage like the moral outrage that is emitted from retired Colonels/ Generals, whose pensions are now being safely paid into their bank accounts monthly ;)
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Xylric

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #88 on: October 21, 2018, 22:26:51 »
You, ah, could employ such individuals as mobile cover, but I'm sure there's regulations against that. :)

Offline Cloud Cover

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Re: On Political Correctness
« Reply #89 on: March 08, 2019, 09:57:27 »
In Canada this PM would be lynched, brought back to life, sued, and banished forever:

Australian PM says women shouldn't rise 'on the basis of others doing worse'

Scott Morrison speaks at an International Women's Day event Friday
Thomson Reuters · Posted: Mar 08, 2019 7:13 AM ET | Last Updated: an hour ago

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison told an International Women's Day breakfast in Perth on Friday that he wants to see women rise, but not at the expense of others.

"We're not about setting Australians against each other, trying to push some down to lift others up. That's not in our values," he said.

"And that is true about gender equality, too. We want to see women rise. But we don't want to see women rise only on the basis of others doing worse. We want everybody to do better, and we want to see the rise of women in this country be accelerated to ensure that their overall pace is maintained."

More at link:  https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/australia-pm-international-women-s-day-1.5048210

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