Author Topic: Prior U.S military service transfer?  (Read 39385 times)

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Online tomahawk6

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Re: Prior U.S military service transfer?
« Reply #50 on: September 23, 2018, 11:01:31 »
Times have changed but I recall Basic and we had a former Czech soldier who was fluent in a number of languages. He had defected and the Army was going to send to cook school.At the other extreme was a former FFL turned NCO in the US army. He definitely was an impressive guy and quite good at setting an ambush some tactics were not taught usually. It was good to know stuff. He might set his ambush 50 meters off a trail or road.

Offline Blackadder1916

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Re: Prior U.S military service transfer?
« Reply #51 on: September 23, 2018, 14:27:50 »
. . . . I was just looking for any Americans on here who might have prior US military experience before they joined the Canadian Forces. I wanted to know what their experiences were. This thread you've merged my message into, like the previous one, was not what I was asking. I mean no disrespect but can I please have my original post back as a stand alone thread? So far there is no other post/thread that applies specifically to what I've been asking.

If you are only accepting the advice of other Yanquis who joined the CAF, then you may have a long wait for someone to mosey on past this thread or even a standalone thread with the exact criteria you want .  We are a relatively small community who frequent this forum and while there has been the occasional foreigner who has passed this way on his search for info about joining the CF, at the present none of the regular participants (to my recollection) are in your category.  The consolidation of similar questions into larger threads is one of the common forum management processes that we have come to expect; it works a little better for us than multiple standalone threads.

In looking at your original post, my take is that the essence of your request is;

. . .  dual US-Canadian citizen. . . Served 8 years in the US military as a commissioned officer. . .  considering joining a local reserve unit (enlisted or officer, don't care) or the cadets as a CIC officer. . .

. . .  was your prior service an impediment in any way? . . . . I have no idea how complicated this would be in terms of what the CAF might want beyond my DD-214, old US military references, my old US military medical files, etc. and whether this whole thing would just be a can of worms or whether I'm making this out to be more complicated than it will be.

You are in the same boat as any other former foreigner (regardless of country, though slightly different for those from countries with the Queen as head of state) who came to our shores and now wishes to try military service again.  You already meet the number one criteria for enrolment - you have Canadian citizenship.  First big hurdle passed.

You may be "making this out to be more complicated than it will be" but it will be more complicated than for someone who was born, lived and was educated in the Great White North.  During your enrolment processing you will likely be asked to provide verification that you were indeed born in the USA, lived where you said you did, received whatever education you say you have (and that it was equivalent to a Canadian education - though that is not usually a problem for Americans) and that you have no criminal history in any of the countries in which you have lived.  Making a claim that you have previous military service will probably be one of the least complicated aspects of your enrolment process, unless of course you are seeking some advanced standing based on your US military training.  Then a PLAR would have to be completed before your enrolment and that may take some time.  Probably the easiest way to get a slight jump on the process is to request a copy of your OMPF.  Just the fact that you served in the US military shouldn't be an impediment to joining the CAF, neither should dual citizenship unlike the US military.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2018, 14:33:59 by Blackadder1916 »
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Online tomahawk6

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Re: Prior U.S military service transfer?
« Reply #52 on: September 23, 2018, 15:53:48 »
I am curious why after 8 years you would opt to join the CF ? I am guessing that you may be a Captain with only another year or so before selection to Major ? Thanks

Offline Blackadder1916

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Re: Prior U.S military service transfer?
« Reply #53 on: September 23, 2018, 17:02:51 »
I am curious why after 8 years you would opt to join the CF ? I am guessing that you may be a Captain with only another year or so before selection to Major ? Thanks


Maybe this has something to do with it.

. . .  married my college sweetheart who is Canadian. Served 8 years in the US military as a commissioned officer. Moved to Canada about a decade ago for my wife's career. . . .
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Offline Dimsum

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Re: Prior U.S military service transfer?
« Reply #54 on: September 23, 2018, 18:49:58 »
Understood, thank you. I did contact a local reserve unit and even went to the local armoury during a drill night. The recruiter there was very busy and we didn't talk much but I had some great conversations with some of the reservists. At the moment, I'm out of town for my job and not near an office, so I thought I'd ask my questions on here in case there are any other Americans like me who have done this.

While the reserve recruiters might have some insight, probably a better way to go is to get to the Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre closest to you and ask those questions.  They would have the most updated info.
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Offline Buck_HRA

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Re: Prior U.S military service transfer?
« Reply #55 on: October 03, 2018, 12:04:44 »
After reading the thread I'm not catching what your questions are specifically, but here are some recruiting comments.

1) Can you join?
The basic requirements to join the CAF are
a) Age (between the ages of 16 and depending on enrollment plan upper age is 46-57) - from the sounds of if you meet that requirement
b) Citizenship (be a Canadian Citizen) - you state you meet that requirement
c) Education - depending on the occupation you wish to join is depending on the requirement education - if you educated outside of Canada you will need to have that education assess by an agency such as World Education Services (http://www.wes.org)

2) Will your previous service hinder your enrollment?
Nope, it will be treated like any other employer you had outside of Canada

3) Will the CAF recognize your prior service?
There are some situations where yes, however being that you served with a military that doesn't have the Queen as the Head of State; it is not likely that much (if anything) will be granted to you from your prior service with the US Military.

As suggested, your best option is to speak with the Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre in your location; not to put down the Reserves, but I worked as a Recruiter in a Reserve Unit many moons ago and did so without any specialized training.  The recruiters at the CFRC have to do a recruiter course just to be there :-)

Offline BC Old Guy

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Re: Prior U.S military service transfer?
« Reply #56 on: October 03, 2018, 15:47:40 »
In response to paulc87, I've not seen previous allied/US military service hinder enrollment.  My experience is from the other side of the coin - as a recruiter and a Reserve Unit leader. Also, my experience is somewhat dated, but having followed the conversations on this site, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

One of the big hurdles is Canadian citizenship.  I had a Brit trying to join, and at that time, the citizenship requirement was the first Go/No Go test.  Since he did not have Citizenship, we could not get him into the system.  As soon as he received his citizenship, the system kicked in.

Another hurdle is the criminal record check, and the background check for the time you were (out of the country - Edit out) not living in Canada.  The rules have changed over the years, but it still takes time for the checks to take place.  You may have to initiate some yourself.

Another hurdle is having your previous service reviewed.  The unit will need copy of course reports and/ or qualification records.  These will be submitted to the review authorities, usually Subject Matter Experts at Army/Navy/Airforce HQ, who will evaluate the qualifications, and experience, and provide an equivalency.  This is a process that has seen a number of revisions over the years.  Sometimes this process can be done while the recruiting screening process is on-going, and at other times the authorities refuse to consider the matter until after enrollment.

I've seen this process happen quickly - an allied CF-18 pilot on an exchange posting to a Canadian CF-18 squadron who wanted to join the RCAF.  Normally it takes some time, as the HQ authorities make contact with someone who can provide current information on the equivalent Canadian qualifications of the foreign military experience and qualifications under review.

I've seen a former US Marine join a reserve unit - he had to provide info that he was not liable for further US Marine Reserve service, but this was done quickly from the US side, and his processing was as quick (or as slow) as the other applicants applying at the same time.  In his case, the review of qualifications and experience was completed after enrollment, and was done quickly.

Hope this helps.

BCOG

 
« Last Edit: October 03, 2018, 15:52:56 by BC Old Guy »