Author Topic: All Things HMCS Windsor (merged)  (Read 27209 times)

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17thRecceSgt

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Re: CBC guy Aboard HMCS Windsor
« Reply #50 on: October 10, 2006, 18:23:28 »
Do you know how hard it is to detect a sub? Thats your answer....

Hey Jonesy from "The Hunt For Read October" was pretty good at it...that was real wasn't it?  ;D

Offline Journeyman

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Re: CBC guy Aboard HMCS Windsor
« Reply #51 on: October 10, 2006, 19:51:40 »
Just curious.
Pathfinders have the skill sets to deploy from submarines, and to be recovered by submarines. Details? Scenarios? They're very high-speed. Just know that good, high-speed  troops have a mindset to do what needs doin'

It should now be obvious that running a country is NOT an entry-level job.  [Yes, it applies to both sides of our border]

Offline warspite

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Re: CBC guy Aboard HMCS Windsor
« Reply #52 on: October 10, 2006, 20:17:34 »
I was watching CBC The National last night and the host ( peter was away ) showed a clip of another CBC guy aboard HMCS Windsor and showed what he called paratroopers on board with him. They said that special segment was coming on the National soon, but wouldn't say when. I scoured the CBC website but found nothing. I DO NOT want to miss that, it looks very interesting indeed, so if you hear anything please post or PM me. 
Great now I have to devote part of my night to watching the national until this is shown ;D

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Re: CBC guy Aboard HMCS Windsor
« Reply #53 on: October 11, 2006, 11:24:50 »
Hey Jonesy from "The Hunt For Read October" was pretty good at it...that was real wasn't it?  ;D

Oh we are so funny..... ::)
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
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Offline Crown-Loyal

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Re: CBC guy Aboard HMCS Windsor
« Reply #54 on: October 11, 2006, 23:31:08 »
It was shown tonight. Pretty cool little segment. I'll be sure to send my application to the navy very soon :o   ahh the power of tv over a youths mind......
“Police arrested two kids yesterday, one was drinking battery acid, the other was eating fireworks. They charged one and let the other one off.”

17thRecceSgt

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Re: CBC guy Aboard HMCS Windsor
« Reply #55 on: October 11, 2006, 23:36:26 »
It was shown tonight. Pretty cool little segment. I'll be sure to send my application to the navy very soon :o   ahh the power of tv over a youths mind......

Then hour plan is verking....

Offline Crown-Loyal

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Re: CBC guy Aboard HMCS Windsor
« Reply #56 on: October 12, 2006, 13:13:34 »
good accent  ;D
“Police arrested two kids yesterday, one was drinking battery acid, the other was eating fireworks. They charged one and let the other one off.”

Offline GRACE OMALLEY

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All Things HMCS Windsor (merged)
« Reply #57 on: February 19, 2016, 18:04:08 »
HMCS Windsor's return to Halifax has been delayed due to a battery cell malfunction, a spokesman from Maritime Forces Atlantic said Friday.

On Monday, crew members discovered a battery cell on the submarine had started to spread discharge to another cell, Capt. Cameron Hillier said. The batteries help propel the vessel.

"It was quickly isolated and contained," Hillier said.

"There was no fire or anything like that. Essentially, the issue was identified and immediately isolated."

'Minor mechanical incident

Link to full article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/hmcs-windsor-battery-1.3456176
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jollyjacktar

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Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #58 on: June 02, 2016, 07:28:57 »
The Halifax Chronicle Herald have a short video onboard HMCS Windsor at sea.  They interview two of the crew and it will give you a small taste of the Submariner lifestyle.  It's like the old Keith's IPA slogan, "those that like it, like it a lot".

Story and video

Offline mariomike

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #59 on: June 02, 2016, 07:48:46 »
Thanks for posting JJT.

When I was a little kid, a neighbour who was in the Navy told us he slept in the torpedo tubes!  :)

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #60 on: June 02, 2016, 08:06:08 »
Very nice JJT.

One small correction to the article. Unless things have changed drastically (and I doubt it), no one goes down on a submarine unless they volunteer for it: So it's not a majority but all of the crew that is volunteers.

And diesel gets into more than just your blood: It get's everywhere. On Ojibwa, a friend of mine (British exchange officer) tried the following experiment on a three weeks deployment: On the jetty, he took out a clean submariner sweater (turtle neck thick woven cotton), wrapped it in heavy plastic, then immersed the sweater into a bucket of clean water, sealed the bucket and it was taken to sea for the duration. When they came back, they unwrapped the sweater on the jetty, and Lo and Behold!  It smelled of diesel.  ;D

Offline Lumber

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #61 on: June 02, 2016, 08:28:10 »
Very nice JJT.

One small correction to the article. Unless things have changed drastically (and I doubt it), no one goes down on a submarine unless they volunteer for it: So it's not a majority but all of the crew that is volunteers.

Things certainly have changed OGBD, at least for Officers. About the time I was wrapping up my tour as the AWWO (all 9 months of it), the subbies around the fleet who had just passed their boards were being pressed into the submarine service. Basically, if the course for the D-level you wanted was full, they weren't letting you just consolidate for 6 months until the next course started, they sent you off to be a submariner. I can't say for certain, but I think 5 of the 6 Officers on the BSQ that started about the time I left had NOT volunteer to be on that course.

Even more scary, and I can't confirm this as truth, just a rumour, but apparently they were so desperate for Submariner officers that the students on the AWWD and UWWD were told "if you fail, you don't get a second shot at this course, you're going Subs...".
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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #62 on: June 02, 2016, 09:02:46 »
Well Lumber, that is a sad state of affairs.

However, telling people on D-level to pass or else you're going sub is something that's been around forever - but to my knowledge never carried trough.

To me it would not be a threat ... but a treat  :nod:

Offline Dolphin_Hunter

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #63 on: June 02, 2016, 09:31:33 »
I loved my sub time.  I have nothing negative to say about my experiences as a submariner.

I'd probably still be there had there not been the hiatus after the Chicoutimi incident.    A posting ashore just wasn't challenging enough, so I made the jump to the RCAF. 




Offline Lumber

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #64 on: June 02, 2016, 09:50:52 »
I loved my sub time.  I have nothing negative to say about my experiences as a submariner.

I'd probably still be there had there not been the hiatus after the Chicoutimi incident.    A posting ashore just wasn't challenging enough, so I made the jump to the RCAF.

And now you hunt the subs...
"Aboard his ship, there is nothing outside a captain's control." - Captain Sir Edward Pellew

“Extremes to the right and to the left of any political dispute are always wrong.”
― Dwight D. Eisenhower

Death before dishonour! Nothing before coffee!

jollyjacktar

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #65 on: June 02, 2016, 09:54:07 »
Very nice JJT.

One small correction to the article. Unless things have changed drastically (and I doubt it), no one goes down on a submarine unless they volunteer for it: So it's not a majority but all of the crew that is volunteers.

And diesel gets into more than just your blood: It get's everywhere. On Ojibwa, a friend of mine (British exchange officer) tried the following experiment on a three weeks deployment: On the jetty, he took out a clean submariner sweater (turtle neck thick woven cotton), wrapped it in heavy plastic, then immersed the sweater into a bucket of clean water, sealed the bucket and it was taken to sea for the duration. When they came back, they unwrapped the sweater on the jetty, and Lo and Behold!  It smelled of diesel.  ;D

When I was having my tour on VIC in April, I was being conducted around by the Fire King, who was more or less sent there because as a Stoker his platforms were gone and he had already done his CPF time.  They wanted to round him out, so off he went.  I also know of ETs that were sent in that direction as well as there was a need and a poor response for volunteers.  But yes, most of the gang are volunteers.

Back when I was a meathead, I was asked to pick up a young OD off one of the O Boats who had been flown into Shearwater by SeaKing for a family emergency and needed transport.  They had only been out for 4-5 days, but my unholy god, the stench coming off him.  I had all the windows rolled down and it still made me gag.  Sweat, diesel, food and some other unmentionable smells were appalling.  I apologized for gagging but he said he understood. 

Later as a Tanker HT I was used to being all diesel smelling as I was the fuel custodian and was playing in it all week long.  Diesel's not too bad and you get used to it, but the rest they put up with.  No, no, no...

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #66 on: June 02, 2016, 10:31:28 »
I protest ... Submariners are not smelly ... well, at least not to one another after a couple of hours  [:D.

First hour back home routine: A long shower. First wash: soft dishwasher soap (you know, the one you manicured your fingers in  :nod:) followed by a long soaping with Irish Spring or Zest! Then triple dose of Head & Shoulders.  After that, my wife would agree to talk to me, but I still had to do my own laundry.  ;D

Offline Colin P

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #67 on: June 02, 2016, 13:51:15 »
Did she set up  a tent, wading pool, sprinkler on the lawn and make you go through a decontamination routine?

We had a Chief on the R class who served on the subs both the O boats and predecessors. He lived on hotdogs and buttermilk and never ate in the mess, nice guy, odd duck.

Offline Nuggs

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #68 on: June 02, 2016, 18:41:14 »
Most are still volunteers, there has been some volunteers recently, MARS and Tech stokers

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Offline mariomike

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #69 on: June 02, 2016, 18:48:47 »
I protest ... Submariners are not smelly ... well, at least not to one another after a couple of hours  [:D.

First hour back home routine: A long shower. First wash: soft dishwasher soap (you know, the one you manicured your fingers in  :nod:) followed by a long soaping with Irish Spring or Zest! Then triple dose of Head & Shoulders.  After that, my wife would agree to talk to me, but I still had to do my own laundry.  ;D

I read that U-Boat crews wore black underwear. 
https://www.google.ca/search?q=black+underwear+u-boats&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=0LZQV9S8OeyM8Qe914nIDQ&gws_rd=ssl#q=%22black+underwear%22+u-boats

Time to re-wind Das Boot!
« Last Edit: June 02, 2016, 22:09:22 by mariomike »

Offline Cloud Cover

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #70 on: June 03, 2016, 12:39:33 »
I guess it is important to distinguish between vapours from unburned diesel oil and the composition of burned diesel and diesel exhaust. Both have some health consequences under prolonged exposure. I am curious if occasional blood testing is performed on submariners for various hydrocarbon toxins, and I am thinking of submariners specifically and not other operators of diesel equipment since submariners are exposed to vapours in a pressurized "tube" for prolonged periods of time?
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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #71 on: June 03, 2016, 12:56:08 »
I have never heard of submariners being screened for exposure to diesel oil or fumes; exposure to radiation if you are on a nuke boat, sure, but for diesel? Never.

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Offline Cloud Cover

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #73 on: June 03, 2016, 13:19:33 »
I have never heard of submariners being screened for exposure to diesel oil or fumes; exposure to radiation if you are on a nuke boat, sure, but for diesel? Never.
Me either, I was just raising the question. I do know there are very good air filtration systems on board.   
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Offline Dimsum

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Re: Diesel get's in your blood, what it's like on a Submarine
« Reply #74 on: June 03, 2016, 13:27:42 »
I understand that submariners only wear black underwear when it's lacy.

 :boke:
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