Author Topic: Canadian Naval Centennial  (Read 84329 times)

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Offline Hawk

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2009, 09:18:09 »
The lapel pin is nice.

Nice to see the old jokes about marching style are still going on. The Army and Air Force always laughed at us at Naden years ago.

I was always under the impression that the proper marching formation for sailors was a gaggle. :)

Offline tree hugger

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2009, 09:44:54 »
I like their logo much better than the official one.
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Offline FSTO

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #27 on: November 17, 2009, 16:06:05 »
The lapel pin is nice.

Nice to see the old jokes about marching style are still going on. The Army and Air Force always laughed at us at Naden years ago.

Air Force and marching? I thought they outlawed that the day they learned to fly!

Offline Hawk

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #28 on: November 18, 2009, 09:59:34 »
You could be right
Air Force and marching? I thought they outlawed that the day they learned to fly!

Maybe that's why WE laughed at the ones who got nailed for parade at Naden!

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2009, 07:25:07 »
I agree that this logo looks much better than the "official" one.  Shame they don't have a tee shirt  or coffee mug option.  Still, I'd buy from these guys before the Canex just for the logo alone.

Offline Occam

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2009, 08:17:42 »
Air Force and marching? I thought they outlawed that the day they learned to fly!

Not all of us got to be pilots, or aircrew for that matter.  Somebody has to fix the stuff they break! :)

I passed one of the "company" posters in the cubicle jungle yesterday.  I don't recall the subject, but it was a photo of the Snowbirds flying in line abreast formation.  Under it, some individual (likely one of the many army types that work in the area) had affixed a sticky note that said "The only place you'll see the Air Force in a straight line".   ;D

Offline Snakedoc

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #31 on: January 15, 2010, 14:13:27 »
I don't think this was posted anywhere but it appears that the Royal Canadian Mint is getting onboard with the centennial celebrations with the Canadian Navy's 100th anniversery being the theme for its 2010 Silver Dollar.

http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/January2010/06/c6650.html

Looks like all those nagging e-mails to the Mint paid off!  I'm definitely getting one.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2010, 14:19:50 by Snakedoc »

Offline Hawk

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #32 on: January 15, 2010, 14:54:59 »
I've never bought coins before - where do I buy one?

Hawk

Offline N. McKay

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2010, 15:14:04 »
I've never bought coins before - where do I buy one?

Try the post office.  They usually carry this kind of thing.

Offline Lex Parsimoniae

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2010, 15:31:37 »
someone wants to foot the bill for one of those swords for me? :)
I got one of the miniature swords (aka letter opener) and quite like it.  1/10 the cost of the full size one and will probably be more useful in the long run ;-)

Offline Hawk

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2010, 19:22:07 »
Thanks, N. McKay - I have to go to the post office tomorrow - I'll check.

Hawk

Offline kratz

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2010, 19:29:48 »
If you are comfortable shopping online, the mint sells coins/sets online as well. Here is the link to the CNC coins.
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Offline Dolphin_Hunter

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #37 on: January 15, 2010, 19:32:23 »
The gold plated coin is a nice piece of work, but I think an enamel coin would look even better, if there are any other coin collecting geeks out there you will know what I am talking about.   

Offline Pat in Halifax

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2010, 07:07:52 »
That coin looks kinda big!!! Where do I put it!!!!
I degress!!!
I just rec`d my order from that  ``other`` supplier of CNC swag (link is earlier in this topic) and quality is fantastic with the cost being roughly a half to two thirds of the CANEX site.  I will probably drop up to the CNC Office here next DWAD with my shirt, jacket and ball cap with the alternate logo to see what the good Captains response is!

On another topic - Has anyone tried volunteering for these Namesake city presentations. A call came out to MARLANT and I seem to keep running in to roadblocks - the last one being there is no money (duh!). For one, I have even volunteered to make my own way there because I visit my mom 8-10 times a year (Barrie) so absolutely no cost to anyone and I still get no response on my wish to volunteer. This whole CNC thing is downright frustrating at times.
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Offline tree hugger

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #39 on: January 20, 2010, 12:30:50 »
Barrie may be covered off by a reserve unit, most likely York.  NRD's all over are being tasked to reach out to the namesake cities.  Try contacting MARS as he should have some insight on this....
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Offline NFLD Sapper

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #40 on: February 08, 2010, 15:16:34 »
Media Advisory
HMC Ships Named For Ottawa Area Highlight Naval Centennial
MARP 002/10 - February 8, 2010


OTTAWA, ONT. – Representatives of the Canadian Navy will present framed pictorial histories of three Ottawa area namesake warships and a shore establishment to His Worship Larry O’Brien at an Ottawa City Council meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 10.  Navy Captain Marty Teft, Assistant Chief of Staff Personnel and Training at Maritime Forces Pacific, Cmdr. Frédérick Caron, Commanding Officer of Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Ottawa and Lt.-Cmdr. Carmen Lapointe, Executive Officer of Ottawa’s Naval Reserve Division, HMCS Carlton will make the presentation to mark the Canadian Naval Centennial at 10 a.m. in Andrew S. Haydon Hall.

Commemorating the current HMCS Ottawa and her predecessors, Naval Radio Station HMCS Gloucestor and HMC ships Eastview, and Rockliffe, the presentations include a picture of the ship (or shore establishment), the ship’s badge and a short history.

HMCS Ottawa is a Halifax Class frigate commissioned into the Canadian Navy in 1997.  She is the fourth ship to carry the name Ottawa, but the only ship named for the city of Ottawa; the others being named for the Ottawa River.  HMCS Ottawa sails with Canada’s Pacific Naval Fleet from Esquimalt Harbour near Victoria, B.C.

The River Class frigate, HMCS Eastview was commissioned into the Canadian Navy June 3, 1944.  She was assigned as the Senior Officer’s ship on her first convoy in September and served continuously for the balance of the European War.  She was transferred to the West Coast for conversion for service in the Pacific.  Her refit had barely begun when war ended.  She was paid off in January 1946, and sold in 1947.  Her hull is part of the Oyster Bay, B.C. breakwater. 

HMCS Rockcliffe was an Algerine Class minesweeper built in Port Arthur and commissioned into the Navy Sept. 30, 1944. After working up in Bermuda she was engaged in North Atlantic convoy duty until June 1945.  She escorted the surrendered German submarine U 889 part of the way to Shelburne, N.S. She was paid off from wartime service in July and was transferred to Esquimalt in December where she served as a training ship until being paid off in Aug. 1950 to be sold for scrap ten years later.

Established as a Naval Radio Station in 1943 to track the German submarine fleet, HMCS Gloucestor was commissioned in 1950 as both a training facility and the home of the Special Communications Branch until it was closed in 1972.

Similar presentations are being made across Canada, to bring attention to the Canadian Naval Centennial and highlight the connection the Navy has with communities large and small in every corner of the country.  Since 1910 Canada has put over 850 warships to sea under the naval ensign. Over 300 ships have been named for communities from coast to coast to coast.
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Offline Pat in Halifax

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #41 on: March 13, 2010, 11:32:40 »
Just did one this past week for HMCS Minas (named for Minasville, NS). Quiet affair-unfortunately not all the fanfare of larger communities but I felt honoured to do it. Apparently Barrie falls under CMS and I was in touch with the Capt(N) doing that one and may 'assist' - Set for 17 May in Barrie. Below is what I submitted to TRIDENT for HMCS Minas, "should" be in this next or the following issue:

On Tuesday, March 9th, just before a lunch break of a meeting of the Municipality of East Hants Executive Committee, I had the honour of making a Namesake Community presentation of a plaque featuring the Second World War Minesweeper HMCS Minas, named for the community of Minasville in the county of East Hants. Accepting the plaque on behalf of his Council was Warden John Patterson, who, himself enlightened the crowd with a short history lesson on a famous Nova Scotian.
Liberal Premier Angus L. MacDonald served his province from 1933 until 1940. In 1940, he was lured to Ottawa and assumed responsibilities as Minister of Defence for Naval Services. He oversaw the creation of a viable Royal Canadian Navy and was instrumental in the development of the convoy system to transport war material to the European front. When hostilities ceased in 1945, Canada yielded the 3rd largest Allied Navy under Minister MacDonald’s tutelage. Returning to Nova Scotia in 1945, his Liberals swept the election winning every single seat. Premier Angus L. MacDonald died while still in Office in 1954.
Work on HMCS Minas was begun in late 1940 at the Burrard Dry Dock Company Ltd in Vancouver, BC. The ship was launched January 22nd, 1941 and commissioned August 2nd, 1941.
Minas, along with sister ships Bellechasse, Burlington, Chedebucto, Chignecto, Clayoquot, Cowichan, Georgian, Mahone, Malpeque, Mirimichi, Nipigon, Outarde, Quatsino, Quinte, Thunder, Ungava and Wasaga were part of the Royal Navy’s Bangor Class of minesweepers. Only on one occasion was an attempt made to mine the entrance to Halifax Harbour by German minelaying submarines and quickly discovered, all mines were disposed of. Again in 1943, the entrance to St John’s, Newfoundland was mined with the same end result. Also, because of the desperate shortage of escort vessels for the Atlantic convoys, Minas and her ‘sisters’ were re-assigned as ‘Coastal Escorts’ with some actually never being fitted with minesweeping gear. As with all newer ships, their design incorporated many improvements on the original; improvements based on lessons learned in the early stages of the Battle of the Atlantic.
The Battle of the Atlantic, which saw Canadian units heavily engaged start to finish, was the longest lasting single campaign of the Second World War, opening with the sinking of the passenger freighter SS Athenia bound for Montreal on September 3, 1939 and closing with Allied Navy and merchant vessels still slugging it out with German submarines and surface raiders until VE Day; May 8, 1945.
HMCS Minas arrived in Halifax on October 19th, 1941 and was briefly based at Sydney before transferring to the Newfoundland Escort Force in January 1942. On April 12th, 1942, southeast of Halifax, her crew took off the crew of the sinking merchantman SS Empire Lotus. That November, she was assigned to the Western Local Escort Force (WLEF) and on November 21st, 1942, her crew again rescued survivors, this time from the torpedoed merchantman Empire Sailor. When WLEF was organized into Escort Groups in June of 1943, Minas became a member of W7, transferring to W4 that December. Earmarked for invasion duties, she and sister minesweepers Blairmore, Fort William and Milltown left Halifax on February 20th, 1944 for the U.K. via the Azores as one of four groups of four minesweepers each for a total of 16 vessels. She served with the 31st Minesweeping Flotilla as part of a bigger Armada of over 5000 Allied vessels of various types and sizes supporting over 150,000 ground troops on D-Day; June 6th, 1944. Minas and the nine other Canadian vessels of the 31st Flotilla were assigned primary minesweeping duties to support the American landings at Omaha beach. For many months following the invasion, Minas and her crew were kept busy clearing coastal ports in France and Belgium as Allied troops advanced and re-occupied them. At war’s end, Minas remained behind in U.K. waters along with the bulk of Canadian minesweepers to then clear Allied ports of mines through to the fall of 1945. Returning to Canada, she was paid off into Reserve status in October 1946.
Reacquired in 1952 and recommissioned on March 15th, 1955 for training purposes, Minas spent that summer on the Great Lakes before leaving for the west coast. Finally paid off November 7th, 1955 at Esquimalt, her crew brought sister minesweeper HMCS Sault Ste Marie back to Halifax. Minas was sold in August 1958 for scrap and broken up in Seattle, Washington.
Minesweepers of the Royal Canadian Navy, Ken MacPherson

Asked what my connection to the community was, I initially felt a moment of panic as in reality I had no personal connection but then I began thinking - I have now lived the bulk of my adult life and half of my entire life in this province I have come to call home. When the idea for plaque presentations to namesake communities was first mentioned, I started looking at communities I knew were small and may not necessarily have current serving members representing them. When the call went out for volunteers for presentations, aside from communities I did have connections with, I also volunteered for some of the smaller ones; Minasville (HMCS Minas) among them. It was therefore, a special privilege for me to represent those no longer among us in my adoptive home province and my study of the minesweeper HMCS Minas as well as my new found knowledge of East Hants, has created a personal bond I suspect will be with me for the rest of my days. 
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Offline Hawk

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #42 on: March 27, 2010, 08:08:32 »
I had to go to the main branch post office in Winnipeg yesterday and while I was there I bought a Navy Centennial proof silver dollar. Its truly beautiful and well worth the cost!

Hawk

Offline Pat in Halifax

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #43 on: March 30, 2010, 06:45:47 »
This just in:
Now available in the CANEX Outlets:


      HMCS SACKVILLE Commemorative Collector's Coin - $46.99

      CNC Pewter Pin (authorized for wear on Unifrom) - $4.49

Note: The pewter pin is slightly larger than the issue one but barely noticable even if 2 people are standing side by side with the 2 different ones - I know!
"No ******* ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making some other dumb ******* die for his"
George S. Patton

Offline ctjj.stevenson

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #44 on: April 18, 2010, 19:36:43 »
For those people who are interested... the Naval Centennial Flag is now on sale: www.flagshop.com.

Cheers!
Lieutenant de vaisseau Christophe T. Stevenson, R.C.N.
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Offline FSTO

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #45 on: April 29, 2010, 17:10:00 »
Has anyone seen the new Canadian Navy Centennial Advertisement? Its not too bad.

Offline Hawk

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #46 on: April 29, 2010, 17:42:05 »
Saw it last night. I thought it was great!

Hawk

Offline gwp

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #47 on: April 30, 2010, 22:33:02 »
Has anyone seen the new Canadian Navy Centennial Advertisement? Its not too bad.
You can see it on line on the recruiting website.

http://www.forces.ca/navycentennial/

A purist would say that it is a year early as the RCN was not created until August 1911.  Initially the Navy was known as the Canadian Naval Service or operationally as Canadian Naval Forces.  Officers used the initials CNF after their name until the Royal designation was approved by HM George V 15 months later. 
« Last Edit: April 30, 2010, 22:38:47 by gwp »

jollyjacktar

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #48 on: May 01, 2010, 06:28:53 »
Most of the stuff they have come up with so far I am not too keen on, but I like this ad.

Offline kratz

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Re: Canadian Naval Centennial
« Reply #49 on: May 01, 2010, 16:17:16 »
Someone (no names, no pack drill), bought us the small CNC logo magnets. The damned things started peeling on the first warm day after winter.  :threat: They want to advertise the event and take my $2.38 (for two), the least they could do is ensure the quality of the products the CNC name is attached to.

My homemade magnet, with the free CNC sticker has never peeled in the 5 weeks of tempature changes and car washes.
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