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CIC recruiting process...the medical

catalyst

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OK So if all goes well with my chat with the CO next week, I will be starting the processing to enter the CIC. I'm a bit confused about the medical...is this going to really take that long...I've seen the posts (and read the FAQ) and it talks about both res and regs...although the CIC is a res component, I wasn't sure if that would apply to me or not?

Any thoughts?

Also, during your medical, do they do a dental exam? My eyes are not that good (i wear glasses) but since its not like combat or combat support I think I'll be OK.

:salute: Michelle
 

Scott

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The medical is not that long. Questions about medical history, eye/ear tests, reflexes, etc. It is your run of the mill checkup.

Nothing dental as far as I know unless you have  had previous problems.

This is required because, as you said, the CIC is a component of the Reserves. Don't fret. I am a -4 (Vision) and I still qualified for Infantry when I first joined.
 
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mclipper

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The max that you can be is a V3 to meet the vision standard for inf.  CIC applicants do not have to meet the same medical standards as everyone else though.
 

wongskc

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If you're doing CIC, don't worry.  I have a buddy that just made it in, he can't run a block, and his heart sounds like a machine gun.  Ironically enough, on top of that, he got the job of PE&RT course officer at a cadet camp.
 

Sundborg

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wongskc said:
If you're doing CIC, don't worry.   I have a buddy that just made it in, he can't run a block, and his heart sounds like a machine gun.   Ironically enough, on top of that, he got the job of PE&RT course officer at a cadet camp.
To expand on that a little, when I used to be in cadets, I had a gentleman apply for CIC who was overweight and had diabetes...  he still got it.
 
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mclipper

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They don't do the fitness test or the CFAT, but they do have to do a medical.  As I said before though, they don't need to meet the same medical standard as everyone else.
 

catalyst

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Hey thanks for all your answers. I've never one to be thin...but I've been in great shape in the past, heavy and all...I've joined a gym so that my health/fitness is better and I can set an example for the cadets.

I've never been one to run though - I think that there are other ways of maintaining physical fitness than just straight running.

I just hope the medical doesn't take that long to process!
 

qjdb

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I took mine almost 2 years ago, and the medical was just going in and having their doctor take a look at you.

And trust me, as far as being in shape goes:  if you can jog a bit, then you are in like Flynn.  There was one gal on my BOQ, who was easily 350 lbs, well, lets put it this way, they couldn't find a combat shirt big enough for her, she had to wear a t-shirt.  And that was in Victoria, where they have CFB Esquimalt to pull clothing from.

Yeah, you shouldn't have a problem.  But, like you said, it is nice to be able to match some of your cadets, when you go for a jog.  I am not in GREAT shape either, but I am working on that.  I can still do a jog with a full rucksack (I pack way too much stuff) to go from the end of a platoon to the front, when we are doing a route march.  I can't compete with the athletes in our unit, but I can stay at about the middle of the pack.

Of course, if you take the kids on a run, just volunteer to be the 'tail-end Charlie and stay with the kids that are at the back of the pack  ;D.

And as far as the timings on getting your medical are concerned, it sounds like our applications take about the same amount of time as those for the regs and res's (4 - 6 weeks)

Good luck, and enjoy becoming a CIC Officer
 

Garbageman

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qjdb said:
And as far as the timings on getting your medical are concerned, it sounds like our applications take about the same amount of time as those for the regs and res's (4 - 6 weeks)

Just a warning - the CIC recruiting process is often placed at the bottom of the pecking order in terms of a Recruiting Centre's priorities.  I've seen many people wait 6 months to a year to be processed. 

As for the medical, well, as was said, it's a joke.  I know CIC types missing a kidney, with severe alergies, chronic back problems, etc.  All of these things would raise an alarm for the Reg Force or P Res, but the job requirements of an officer in the CIC are a lot different.  That and the CIC branch is currently way way way understaffed. 

I'm glad you're remembering that one of principle goals of the cadet movement is to promote physical fitness though.  A lot of CIC types seem to forget this, and don't exactly present a 'model image' to their cadets.

REMEMBER THE CADET
 

combat_medic

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Having worked at a cadet camp MIR, I can also attest to the poor medical health of many CIC officers. Short of being legally blind or deaf, or paralyzed in some way, just about every other serious medical condition is let slide (diabetes, kidney malfunction, hypertension, congenital heart problems etc.). If there even IS a medical to get in, assuming you walk through the door and answer the questions, you'll probably pass.

Also, if it's any consolation, I know approximately 5 CIC officers who are in the CIC because they failed the PRes medical exam.
 

SoapMac

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Now that it's 2015 and this post is from 2004, I just want to give you guys an update on this.
Medical assessments for CIC Officers is no joke. They now medically asses every applicant at the same level as if you were applying to Reg or Reserve.
Although no mandatory physical or aptitude assessment is currently in place, expect at least a physical to be introduced very soon as part of the enrolment process. If you don't pass, you don't get enrolled. Again, this is currently in the works to be mandatory in the future. Any other issues that would result in an unfit for duty report from RMO in the application for Reg/Res, goes for CIC too. 
We have a few members that are in great shape and have turned down for the simplest things, meanwhile the current serving ones are over 300lbs that received their commission years ago but are already in the system. 
 

dapaterson

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Mac1969 said:
Now that it's 2015 and this post is from 2004, I just want to give you guys an update on this.
Medical assessments for CIC Officers is no joke. They now medically asses every applicant at the same level as if you were applying to Reg or Reserve.
Although no mandatory physical or aptitude assessment is currently in place, expect at least a physical to be introduced very soon as part of the enrolment process. If you don't pass, you don't get enrolled. Again, this is currently in the works to be mandatory in the future. Any other issues that would result in an unfit for duty report from RMO in the application for Reg/Res, goes for CIC too. 
We have a few members that are in great shape and have turned down for the simplest things, meanwhile the current serving ones are over 300lbs that received their commission years ago but are already in the system.

The medical standards are different for COATS officers and Reg F/P Res.  It is not the same level.  COATS must meet 433335; Reg/PRes it's 432225 (see: http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/about-policies-standards-medical-occupations/cf-medical-category-system.page).

Translated into English, it means COATS officers may have worse hearing, increased need of regular medical care, and may be unable to perform certain military tasks.  Under certain circumstances, vision standards may be lowered, and further lowering of standards for requirement for medical care and ability to perform certain military tasks may be lowered as well.
 

Wrangler

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Now that 2016 has arrived, cold someone that recently went through their CIC medical explain what exactly it is they do. Is this a full blown medical with stress tests, blood work and urine samples, or just a review of what ails you? Do you need to bring anything from your own doctor?
 

DAA

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Wrangler said:
Now that 2016 has arrived, cold someone that recently went through their CIC medical explain what exactly it is they do. Is this a full blown medical with stress tests, blood work and urine samples, or just a review of what ails you? Do you need to bring anything from your own doctor?

The Medical process for CIC Applicants is the same for any other applicant to the CF, Regular and Reserve Force alike.  Once you have made contact with a local Cadet Unit, which is your first step and having gone through their own processing and been approved/recommended, I believe they will refer you to your local Recruiting Detachment for the Medical, Interview and Background check processes.

The medical is a basic questionnaire followed by a cursory exam, similar to what you would probably experience when obtaining a new doctor.  If they require additional information regarding any medical issues that arise, the CAF Health Care Professionals will provide you with paperwork to be completed by your family doctor for return to your local Recruiting Detachment and further processing/review.
 
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A quick question:  my brother is HIV positive and he is healthy and on medications which keep his HIV status as undetectable.  He is aiming to apply for the Reserves.  Would he pass the medical examination?  Do they test or ask about HIV?  He is a keen and serious candidate but I think he is too nervous to ask.  Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.    Thank you!
 
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A quick question:  my brother is HIV positive and he is healthy and on medications which keep his HIV status as undetectable.  He is aiming to apply for the Reserves.  Would he pass the medical examination?  Do they test or ask about HIV?  He is a keen and serious candidate but I think he is too nervous to ask.  Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.    Thank you!
 

RedcapCrusader

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ServeMyCountry said:
A quick question:  my brother is HIV positive and he is healthy and on medications which keep his HIV status as undetectable.  He is aiming to apply for the Reserves.  Would he pass the medical examination?  Do they test or ask about HIV?  He is a keen and serious candidate but I think he is too nervous to ask.  Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.    Thank you!

He will have to disclose it.

Requiring a regular and scheduled supply of medications (which can be expensive) will be taken into consideration. If he is applying to the Cadet Instructor Cadre, there might be some wiggle room, but for the Primary Reserve... That's where they begin to draw the line.

The CAF cannot guarantee that should your brother be sent to work in an isolated area for an extended period of time (mainly for the PRes, on tasking or deployment) that medications and the required medical treatment necessary to care for the condition will be available. The CAF is also not too keen on paying for a continuous supply of expensive medications, unless it is due to something that occurred during time of service.
 

Joshua2597

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In 2017 are there any

medical or physical fitness test or is just the same as before you just need to take part but not pass
 
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