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Const. Chris Garrett Medal Thread- Merged

Cheshire

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http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2007/12/08/garrett-medal.html

Finally, clear thinking on this issue. Looks like he might just get it.
 

geo

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Oik.... is it possible that some gov't rep has been trolling the forum & has read our words of wisdom (for and against) and they have seen the light?
 

George Wallace

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geo said:
Oik.... is it possible that some gov't rep has been trolling the forum & has read our words of wisdom (for and against) and they have seen the light?

Let's just say that is isn't a possibility, but a fact and leave it at that.  ;)    That was almost poetic.
 

Petard

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I sure hope so
Up until now I kept on being reminded of the saying "the law is an ass", and I'm talking about the order in council that set this arbitrary timeline of 2 years, its absurd, because in a sense what it was indirectly doing is saying that if someones actions were not brought properly to attention then the act was no longer worthy of recognition, and the process was going before the principle. The process should evaluate wether or not the act warrants such recognition, I do not see anything so far in this thread that justifies the 2 year time limit and why that should be a factor in wether or not someone should be considered "worthy", the only purpose this time limit seems to have is to possibly discourage would be pretenders.
Takes this to the extreme, such as the case of those soldiers taken prisoner in the defence of Hong Kong, what if such a similar time limit existed then, anyone involved with brave acts, such as CSM Osborn V.C., would have to go unrecognized simply because no one would have been able to report it within the 2 year time limit. Is it not possible that a similar event could occur where we might not know of someones brave acts while in captivity until they or other survivors are released? 
But the exception does prove the rule, looks to me like Officer Garrets actions on that night might well do this, perhaps in more ways then one his actions that night will of had a positive effect. Should this "precedent" then result in a flood of would be gong hunters, then their individual cases would have to be weighed carefully on the evidence presented, IMO, one of the factors should not be the time at which the evidence arrived, but on its own merit and credibility. 
 

George Wallace

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Petard

If there is no limit, then the process will become too combersum to administer.  Should, for example (A very extreme, but not unthinkable example.), someone now decide that their Great Great Great Uncle performed an extreme act of heroism during the War of 1812 and should be recognized for it, how long would it take to conduct the research and verification of the actions of said Great Great Great Uncle?  Where would we find witnesses and collaboration of the facts?  Would we have to create a new award for the researchers who would spend a lifetime verifying such claims? 

As is, there seems to have been a decision made, and all our arguments are mot.
 

Armymedic

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While I understand the need to limit the time frame for application to the CoV, this case should be an exception to that rule as application was delayed in pursuit for justice.
 

Cheshire

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Can we please get the title of this thread changed ASAP. Troy Davey was the accused who murdered Constable Chris Garrett. Not the other way around. Thanks.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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Cheshire said:
Can we please get the title of this thread changed ASAP. Troy Davey was the accused who murdered Constable Chris Garrett. Not the other way around. Thanks.

F%@#, no thank you for pointing that out......many apologies, I'll blame it on middle of the nightshift merging,...but still punch myself in the groin for plain stupidity.
Bruce
 

The Bread Guy

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According to the petition site (.pdf screen capture as of 151019E Mar 08 attached): 
"The first hurdle has been passed! In an Order of Council, the Rt. Hon. Steven Harper has Changed the rules of Eligibility. The new rules Include 2 yrs. from the Event OR the end of the Trial/Inquirey. Now, we just need to convince the Governal General, that Chris's actions merit the award. Please send your emails to : info@gg.ca"

Nothing I could find on PCO's OIC search page, nothing in Canada Gazette, nothing I could find in MSM - has anyone seen any independent verification of this?

Also, I stand to be corrected, but IF an OIC is passed by Cabinet, even if it's not been "Gazetted", GG would have to follow its direction nonetheless?
 

zipperhead_cop

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This link may be on the older side, but it is still well done:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGi7Ns3fMhw
 

Occam

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I'm glad to see this officer finally get formally recognized for his sacrifice.


Shared in accordance with the "fair dealing" provisions, Section 29, of the Copyright Act.

Star of Courage for Constable Chris Garrett
Kingston Whig Standard, 10 December 2008
Article link

It’s not what was demanded by the people of Canada, but the Governor General’s office has announced a slain Cobourg Police officer will be posthumously awarded the second highest bravery medal in the land.

Constable Chris Garrett was the only recipient of the Star of Courage announced by the Governor General’s office on Wednesday.

Fourteen other people will receive the Medal of Bravery.

The Cross of Valour is "awarded for acts of the most conspicuous courage in circumstance."

Constable Garrett was murdered in the line of duty after responding to an alleged robbery call in the early hours of May 15, 2004.

Troy Davey had an elaborate plan to murder numerous officers and civilians in Cobourg. After suffering a fatal knife wound to the throat, Constable Garrett ran after his attacker firing his service weapon. Constable Garrett struck Mr. Davey was his last shot from his weapon before succumbing to his wound. Mr. Davey was later arrested at Northumberland Hills Hospital in Cobourg where he was being treated for his wound.

"Through his final act of courage, Constable Garrett prevented his assailant from carrying out a plan to harm his fellow police officers and civilians," states the announcement on the Governor General’s website.

Initially the Governor General’s office refused the application for Constable Garrett referring to a two year deadline for nominations. Constable Garrett’s application for the Cross of Valour was not submitted because the trial did not finish till after the two-year deadline.

Because of support from thousands of people across Canada who signed a petition, the federal government amended the Canadian Decorations Regulations allowing Constable Garrett’s name to be permitted.

Port Hope Police Sgt. Darren Strongman was one of the people who nominated his longtime friend for the Cross of Valour.

Speaking from Sudbury, Sgt. Strongman, although Constable Garrett is being recognized, maintains, "In our hearts we know what Chris did and, in our minds, he will always be our hero."

Speaking from their home in Odessa, Constable Garrett’s parents Gord and Evelyn said they were notified by Secretary to the Governor General Emmanulle Sajous on Wednesday morning.

"She wanted us to be the first to know that Chris would be awarded the Star of Courage," Ms. Garrett said.

"If that’s all they can give him, we’re happy with that, but it won’t bring him back."

Ms. Garrett said the family wanted to thank all the people across Canada for the "tremendous support" in honouring their son.

"As many years as it’s been, it’s still terrible. It will never be over," a shaken Ms. Garrett said.

"We’re very proud of him and he gave his life for something he believed in. We know he’s a hero no matter what."

The Governor General’s office said the medal would be presented to the Garrett’s. The family has decided it will go to Constable Garrett’s son, Ben, 18.

"I’m proud he’s finally getting recognized for what he deserves," Ben said from his home in Burlington.

"It’s fantastic, but I really believe he deserves the Cross of Valour."

Ben said the bottom line is "my dad is a hero, medal or no medal.

"I’m glad it’s over."

Mr. and Mrs. Garrett, along with Constable Garrett’s son, will be attending the ceremony at Rideau Hall in 2009 along with other members of the Garrett family.

NOTE: Since 1972 there have been 20 Cross of Valour’s presented, 415 Star of Courage, and 2,432 Medal of Bravery.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Also see the Governor General's website for announcement.
 

geo

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BZ to Constable Garrett
It only sucks that he won't be present to receive it from a grateful country.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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geo said:
BZ to Constable Garrett
It only sucks that he won't be present to receive it from a grateful country.

Nor will be his friends and some of his family it seems.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2009/06/16/9811551-sun.html

Cop's widow denied hero's honour
Bureaucracy again denies slain officer a proper ceremony -- this time his wife can't go
By JOE WARMINGTON
The Toronto Sun


When the governor general awards the prestigious Star of Courage medal to slain Const. Chris Garrett posthumously Friday, none of his fellow Cobourg Police brethren will be in attendance.
Nor will two of the people waiting for him to come home that May 15, 2004 night -- his wife, Denise Leblanc, or stepdaughter, Brittany -- unless Gov. Gen. Michaelle Jean decides to send out some extra invitations in the next 72 hours.

This is the goal of a group of police and media personalities who have been fighting for Garrett to receive the respect he rightfully deserves since he was murdered in the line of duty foiling a wicked plan of an 18-year-old killer who had written a murder victim list, starting with a police officer.

The first victim was 19-year veteran Garrett, who happened to respond to a phantom robbery call and was ambushed with a military-style knife that slit his throat and nearly decapitated him.
While holding his throat to slow the spraying blood with one hand, Garrett, 39, heroically managed to pull out his revolver and fire at the suspect with his other -- striking him once and landing him in hospital and away from that prepared mayhem list and the Molotov cocktails ready and waiting at his home.

That was quite a sacrifice! And now we can't see to it the rules are bent a little to let his widow get a glimpse of the medal that he died to receive?
"Disgraceful," is the word OPP Commissioner Julian Fantino uses to describe what many people in policing feel is a petty snub. "What an embarrassment."

It does make one wonder if the parole board one day will be as complicated and difficult for Troy Davey, now 23, when he seeks freedom from his life sentence.
"We will never know how many lives Chris saved," says Garrett's close friend of 20 years Sgt. Darren Strongman of the neighbouring Port Hope Police. "But we do know he gave up his life to save them."

The hope is to get Rideau Hall to budge a little. It won't be easy since their rules and protocol are rigid.
Remember the original application was not accepted because of ridiculous red tape -- with staff saying there was a time limit on entries even though the trial for Garrett's killer was still ongoing.

They insisted there was nothing they could do, so a powerful group of police and celebrities in Fantino, York Region Police Chief Armand La Barge, Cobourg Chief Paul Sweet and Don Cherry expressed their displeasure -- and other cops prepared to hand in their service medals in protest.

That lead to the original applicants in Strongman and Sun Media reporter/photographer Pete Fisher meeting with Prime Minister Stephen Harper who had the rule changed so that it no longer has a time frame. We may need the prime minister again -- this time to encourage the governor general to add three extra chairs to the ceremony room at Rideau Hall.
One would be for Denise Leblanc, one for stepdaughter, Brittany, and one for Chief Sweet -- who after all, represents a police service still shaken from the loss of one of its most popular officers.

It may not happen this time since the GG's office says each recipient is offered a chair at the event and permitted three guests of choice. It is "up to them to work it out," says spokesman Lucie Caron, who is sympathetic to the concerns but cites the normal structure of such events.
"We have to be fair to everyone," she says. "Every other family is in the same situation."

Well, not exactly. While it is true there are 40 recipients, the list I have seen shows Garrett as one of two Star of Courage recipient and the only getting it posthumously.
It's a different kind of day for the family who has to have someone stand in for the slain award winner.
The Star will be presented to Garrett's 18-year-old son, Ben, who takes the recipient's chair in his dad's place and the remaining three seats will be appropriately filled by Garrett's mother and father and a sister.

With only three seats, it is difficult for a family who lost a loved one to decide who is left out and they should not be put in that situation at all. And no matter how huffy and puffy Rideau Hall wants to be about their protocol certainly a widow should not be denied. We are better than that.

Strongman said Denise "didn't even know when it was" and still had not "received a return call from the governor general's office" despite putting in three calls.
"My life is forever changed," Leblanc said at the trial. "I lost my best friend, my lover, the person I had trusted the most."

They can bend the rules here -- use the same kind of guts and out-of-the box thinking like Jean did when she ate that seal heart. It will be difficult to believe somewhere inside that giant, taxpayer-funded complex there is not room for three more people.

Another wild card in this story is the mysterious invitation to Chief La Barge. Citing "privacy", Caron would not explain how that is happening while the outspoken-on-this-issue chief of Cobourg police is not on the list. How there is a chair for a chief from a different force is especially mystifying since the GG's office went to great lengths to explain there was no possible way to fit in extra people and that all those in attendance had to be selected by family.

"I can tell you if someone were able to ask Chris who he would want there I can tell you the answer," says Strongman. "Chris would certainly want his wife and stepdaughter to be there sitting along with his courageous son, sister, mom and dad."
Just like when he was trying to get the GG to take the application for the award he is looking for some creative thinking. "After all it's not your everyday situation," said Strongman.

"It's bigger than just your average ceremony and you would think with all of the university degrees in that GG's office, we could find a way to make this work."
Of course, many are wondering is if all of this is payback for being able to get around Rideau Hall's original insistence that Garrett was not eligible for the award.

After that hurdle was cleared, it turned around and awarded Garrett with the Star of Courage instead of the more appropriate Cross of Valour, the highest honour possible. Even son Ben commented then, "it is an honour for him to receive the Star of Courage but there is no doubt he deserves the Cross of Valour."
Either way, his dad will finally get a prestigious medal Friday and if anybody out there has any pull maybe that ceremony could end up including his widow and his chief.

Perhaps this time the governor general will step in and correct this. She recently proved she can eat heart, perhaps she can show some!

JOE.WARMINGTON@SUNMEDIA.CA
 

zipperhead_cop

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if all of this is payback for being able to get around Rideau Hall's original insistence that Garrett was not eligible for the award.

You can be assured that is exactly what this is.  Don't you dare force a bureaucrat to do anything or they will bring their passive/aggressive behind-your-back force to bear and find ways to make your life miserable.  Revenge from the cubicle.  How sweet indeed! 
If Denise does get to go, look to see someone from Revenue Canada taking a hard look at her finances.  (Which will be totally random and not directed by anyone  ::))
 

Loachman

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Unbelievable.

Well, sadly, not really.

Most people would bend over backwards to do the right thing. It takes a particularly petty or stupid twit to treat the survivors of somebody who died in their service and for their protection so shabbily.

I can only hope that Her Excellency becomes aware of this and sorts her minions out in sufficient time.

"Rules are for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men."
- Douglas Bader.
 

bradlupa

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As a resident of the Port Hope, Cobourg area and on the local fire department it makes me extremely dissapointed in the government, what would happen if i lost my life trying to save a life in a fire. Now i know that i would not expect to be presented with a medal for saving a life, that is not why i do it, as our motto goes risk little to save little, risk alot to save alot.  As Const. Garrett did he risk alot (after the fact) to save alot.

I think that the government should just suck it up and give the medal to the family, quit the BS that seems to keep coming back and just go to the higher powers.
 
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