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Crash of CF Aircraft along Syrian Border 9 Aug 1974

Pat in Halifax

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http://archives.cbc.ca/war_conflict/peacekeeping/clips/7516/
One of the 'older' guys at work here was just telling me this story. I met him in the lunch room and he said something along the lines of "I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing at this time exactly 37 years ago". He relayed the story at the link and said he lost a lot of close freinds. He had the unfortunate task to have to pack up his tent mates gear to send home following the crash.
I did a quick google search but kept hitting another key event on this date (actually two); the atomic bomb drop on Nagasaki and Gerald Ford's swearing in. Can anyone provide a link?
 

Michael OLeary

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Michael OLeary

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http://www.buffalo461.ca/buffalo461.htm

United Nations Flight 51

On August 9, 1974, UN Flight 51 was crewed by Captain George Gary Foster (Pilot), Captain Keith Mirau (First Officer), Captain Robert Wicks (Navigator), Master Corporal Ronald Spencer (Flight Engineer), and Corporal Bruce Stringer (Loadmaster). Also on board were four passengers: MWO Gaston Landry, MWO Cyril Korejwo, Corporal Michael Simpson, and Corporal Morris Kennington.

The flight from Beirut to Ismailia proceeded normally. After taking off from Ismailia, passage through Lebanon was also normal and at 0945GMT, UN Flight 51 first contacted Damascus air traffic control center (ATCC). Five minutes later, after receiving clearance to Damascus VOR, the last recorded transmission from Flight 51 to Damascus ATCC reportedly by Captain Mirau, was heard “Roger we are cleared to Damascus VOR to maintain 8000 cross Mike Echo Zulu at 10000 or above.”

As the Buffalo crossed into Syria at 11000’ ASL (about 6000’ above ground level), a surface to air missile was fired at the Buffalo from a Syrian airfield located 14 miles from the Lebanese border. Shortly after, the Buffalo was seen in a controlled descent smoking from the tail. A couple of minutes after the first missile attack, when the Buffalo was 8 miles into Syrian airspace and less than 1000’ above ground level, two more missiles were fired at the Buffalo. The first appeared to strike the left wing causing it to burn and the descent to increase. Just above the ground, the last missile hit the cabin area and destroyed the aircraft, scattering wreckage near the town of Ad Dimas in Syria, and killing all nine passengers and crew on board.
 

mariomike

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Topic: "UN Buffalo aircraft #461":
http://forums.army.ca/forums/threads/84748.0

Topic: "Buffalo 461":
http://forums.army.ca/forums/threads/73244.0
 

Pat in Halifax

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Apologies - Rookie error on my part. I never even thought to do a search on Army.ca.....duh!...
...and thank you everyone for all the info. I have forwarded the link(s) to my coworker.
 

The Bread Guy

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This from the Defence Minister:
Canada has chosen this day to commemorate the contribution and sacrifice made by our nation's peacekeepers, who for over 60 years have served and continue to serve in United Nations peacekeeping operations around the world. Today, we honour our men and women for their high level of professionalism, dedication and courage, and remember those who have paid the ultimate price in order to help ensure the peace and prosperity of others.

The date was chosen to commemorate 9 August 1974, when nine Canadian peacekeepers serving on UNEF II were killed when their aircraft was shot down over Syria, the highest number of Canadian peacekeepers killed in a single incident.

Canada is one of a handful of countries to which the international community has regularly turned to obtain expert advice on peace support issues, as well as soldiers well-trained in the special skills needed for these missions. Canadian Forces (CF) peacekeepers have a long and proud tradition of coming to the assistance of those who need it most: civilians forced from their homes due to civil conflict, emergencies, or natural disasters; whole communities and groups mired in chaos and in distress through no fault of their own.

Today, the CF continues its proud legacy of protecting and assisting civilians in UN-led missions across the globe: in Haiti as part of Operation MINUSTAH; in the Middle East, where the CF has been involved for more than 50 years, and where we are now actively engaged in a number of operations, including Operations JADE and PROTEUS, headquartered in Jerusalem, Operation CALUMET in El Gorah, Egypt, and Operation GLADIUS, in the Golan Heights.

Our peacekeeping support to Africa includes Operation SAFARI, Sudan, and now the world's newest country, South Sudan, where the CF provides 20 UN Military Observers. And, under the banner of Operation CROCODILE, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Canada's military provides expertise in the areas of law and information operations and training.

Wherever we are needed, CF peacekeepers have been there to provide security, humanitarian assistance, and governance support. They have consistently risen to the challenge of keeping our world safe and prosperous, and for that we acknowledge their selfless service with respect and gratitude.
 
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