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Governor General Honours 43 Canadians for Acts of Bravery

big bad john

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I've been following a few threads here on medals and awards but I have contributed little as I am a "new" Canadian and even though I have served, I just might not have earned the right as a Canadian yet.  But I am baffled, no I must say astounded at the way awards for bravery are treated here in Canada and a little puzzled about their treatment here on the site.

First off what astounded me was the lack of coverage by the media today in Ottawa.  All I saw on the CTV National News was a 30 second clip mentioning that their had been a ceremony and that the rarely awarded Cross of Valour had been awarded to a Coast Guard Officer for Rescuing two fishermen.  Nothing on the CBC National.  I don't understand this.

Second, we are all military here for the most part.  How come nothing about this was posted here?  Or am I just blind as usual?

Rant over

Here is the awards list.  Even though most of these awards are to civilians we should be first in honouring them.  Please do yourself a farvour and take sometime and read the citations for the awards.  Thank you for taking the time to puruse this thread.


http://www.gg.ca/media/doc.asp?lang=e&DocID=4873

Cross of Valour

First Officer Leslie Arthur Palmer, C.V.
Prince Rupert, B.C.



Star of Courage

Sergeant Joseph Carl Steeve Bédard, S.C.*, M.B., C.D.

*This is the second Decoration for Bravery awarded to Sgt Bédard
Jonquière, Que.



Medal of Bravery

Douglas Harry Allen, M.B.
Bancroft, Ont.

Larry Anderson, M.B.
Bancroft, Ont.

Patrizio Bartolozzi, M.B.
Calgary, Alta.

Constable Ralph Terrance Brekker, M.B.
Bridgewater, N.S.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Jonathan Roger Brown, M.B.
Langley, B.C.

Geneviève Caron, M.B.
Longueuil, Que.

Guy Clairoux, M.B.
Ottawa, Ont.

Luc Coutu, M.B.
Lindsay, Ont.

Dean Willis Craig, M.B.
Nanaimo, B.C.

Christopher Alan Duggan, M.B. (posthumous)
Prospect, N.S.

Bruce M. Fitzsimmons, M.B.
Union, Ont.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Chad William Greig, M.B.
Surrey, B.C.

Richard Earl Hearns, M.B.
Welland, Ont.

Téodor Gheorghe Hulbar, M.B.
Saint-Hubert, Que.

Michel Jalbert, M.B. (posthumous)
Saint-Eustache, Que.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Gregory Steven Keeler, M.B.
Chester, N.S.

Kenneth Peter Klassen, M.B.
Portage la Prairie, Man.

Constable Stephen Knight, M.B.*
*This is the second Decoration for Bravery awarded to Constable Knight.
Mount Pearl, N.L.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Corporal Joseph Denis Laflamme, M.B.
Ottawa, Ont.

Azzedine Lahrichi, M.B. (posthumous)
Montreal, Que.

Nathalie Lavoie, M.B.
Saint-Eustache, Que.

René Lemaire, M.B. (posthumous)
Île-du-Grand-Calumet, Que.

Paul Luca, M.B.
Montreal, Que.

Constable Daniel John MacPhee, M.B.
Italy Cross, N.S.

Brent Albert McDonald, M.B.
Portage la Prairie, Man.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Leane Fay McNeill, M.B.
Surrey, B.C.

Peggy McIntyre, M.B.
Lindsay, Ont.

Christopher Mervin, M.B.
Chatham, Ont.

William Thomas Richard Nimick, M.B.
Lucan, Ont.

John Brian O’Donnell, M.B.
Bancroft, Ont.

Michael John O’Farrell, M.B.
Bancroft, Ont.

Ronald Clarence O’Neill, M.B.
Cambridge, Ont.

Asif Aly Penwala, M.B.
Longueuil, Que.

Justin Don Pierro, M.B.
Cache Creek, B.C.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Eyvi Sidney Smith, M.B.
Whitehorse, Yk.

Master-Corporal Michael Thomas Stanford, M.B., C.D.
St. John’s, N.L.

Eric P. Stenstrom, M.B.
Montreal, Que.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Craig Andrew Thur, M.B.
Whitehorse, Yk.

Kevin Anthony Venn, M.B.
Richmond, B.C.

Master-Corporal Daniel Joseph Gilles Villeneuve, M.B., C.D.
Aylesford, N.S.

David Ware, M.B.
Brampton, Ont.



ANNEX C

CITATIONS

First Officer Leslie Arthur Palmer, C.V.
Prince Rupert, British Columbia

Late at night on December 27, 2004, First Officer Leslie Palmer, of the Canadian Coast Guard, braved a severe winter storm to rescue two fishermen stranded on the shores of the Grenville Channel, near Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Responding to the distress call, the Coast Guard vessel Point Henry arrived at destination in the worst of weather conditions and searched the shoreline for signs of victims. An hour later, spotting illumination flares set off by the vessel, the two survivors flashed a light in response to show their location. At the risk of perishing, First Officer Palmer got ashore using a small rubber boat but, hindered by the breaking surf on the beach and gusts of wind of up to a hundred knots, had to land half a kilometre from the survivors. Undeterred by the heavy shore spray freezing his eyelids shut and icing up the outer shell of his suit, he walked for an hour in hip-deep snow, struggling against sheer ice footing on a rocky shore, until he reached the two men huddled inside a life raft. Using a Kisby ring, the Point Henry crew transferred survival gear and medical equipment to the trio by carefully floating it to shore. First Officer Palmer valiantly made his way a second time to the beach, secured the equipment and returned to the barely responsive victims to administer first aid. He worked courageously to keep the two fishermen warm and alive as they waited on the beach for another four hours before medical help could reach them. By that time, they had lost all radio contact and had only a flashlight to use as a signal.

Douglas Harry Allen, M.B.
Larry Anderson, M.B.
John Brian O’Donnell, M.B.
Michael John O’Farrell, M.B.
Bancroft, Ontario
Timothy Allan Coulas, M.B.
Combermere, Ontario

Mr. Timothy Allan Coulas is unable to attend the ceremony.

On March 31, 2005, these five men rescued two women trapped in their submerged vehicle in the York River in Bancroft, Ontario. After witnessing the victims’ SUV plunge down an embankment and slide into the river, the rescuers jumped into the icy water to provide assistance. One man swam alongside the vehicle, pushing it towards the riverbank. The vehicle caught on an unknown structure in the riverbed where it remained precariously perched a few metres away from a dam. In a canoe found on shore, two rescuers made their way to the rapidly sinking vehicle, barely avoiding large ice floes swirling down-stream. Reaching the scene, one man left the craft and joined the rest of the team to help the driver into the canoe. While the woman was taken to shore, the passenger was pulled up onto the roof of the partially submerged vehicle. She was then helped into the canoe and brought to safety.  The victims, along with two of the rescuers, were taken to the hospital where they were treated for hypothermia.

Patrizio Bartolozzi, M.B.
Calgary, Alberta

On February 24, 2005, Patrizio Bartolozzi rescued a nine-year-old boy from drowning in the North Saskatchewan River, in Edmonton, Alberta. Hearing the child’s cries for help, Mr. Bartolozzi quickly ran along the river until he reached a spot where the boy was being swept closer to shore. Mr. Bartolozzi pulled off his coat and, in spite of the thin ice surface shifting beneath him, crawled to within a few metres of the panic-stricken child. As he neared the open water, he flung a corner of his jacket to the boy who managed to grab hold of it. Using all his strength, Mr. Bartolozzi then hauled the victim out of the frigid water and carried him a distance of 400 metres before collapsing from exhaustion.

Sergeant Joseph Carl Steeve Bédard, S.C.*, M.B., C.D.
Jonquière, Quebec
Star of Courage
Master-Corporal Daniel Joseph Gilles Villeneuve, M.B., C.D.
Aylesford, Nova Scotia
Medal of Bravery

On March 30, 2005, search and rescue technicians Sgt Steeve Bédard and MCpl Daniel Villeneuve rescued five seal hunters stranded in their disabled fishing vessel in the ocean near les Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Quebec. After several failed attempts to reach the crewmen on the vessel’s deck due to severe weather, the two men decided to conduct individual hoist operations from the water. Braving dangerously high seas, massive ice chunks thrown about by the 30-foot swells and winds in excess of 50 knots, Sgt Bédard was hoisted down to retrieve a first crewman who had unexpectedly jumped into the water. The crewman was floundering dangerously close to the heavy outriggers that threatened to crash onto him. Before the victim could swim to Sgt Bédard, who was being swamped by the waves, the boat crew managed to pull him on board. As night fell, Sgt Bédard and MCpl Villeneuve performed several more hoists from the deadly waters under extremely hazardous conditions and successfully recovered the helpless sealers.

* This is a second Decoration for Bravery awarded to Sgt Bédard.

Constable Ralph Terrance Brekker, M.B.
Bridgewater, Nova Scotia
RCMP Constable Gregory Steven Keeler, M.B.
Chester, Nova Scotia
Constable Daniel John MacPhee, M.B.
Italy Cross, Nova Scotia
Constable Jerome Arnold Richard, M.B.
New Germany, Nova Scotia

Cst. Jerome Arnold Richard is unable to attend the ceremony.

On June 11, 2003, these four police officers were instrumental in the arrest of a deranged, suicidal and heavily armed fugitive following a day-long manhunt marked by gunfire, near Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. After a series of altercations, which included shooting at officers, the suspect crashed his vehicle at high speed into Cst. Brekker’s stopped police cruiser, injuring him before escaping in his own vehicle. The four officers pursued the gunman even though it was obvious that he had a high-powered weapon that he was prepared to fire in their direction. The suspect got out of his vehicle on the edge of a heavily populated neighborhood and began shooting at all four officers with a hunting rifle. An RCMP emergency response team finally surrounded the area, cornered and fatally wounded the suspect, ending an extremely dangerous situation that lasted some 20 hours through two rural counties of Nova Scotia.

RCMP Constable Jonathan Roger Brown, M.B.
Langley, British Columbia
RCMP Constable Leane Fay McNeill, M.B.
Surrey, British Columbia

On December 25, 2004, Constables Jonathan Brown and Leane McNeill saved two people from a fiery death in White Rock, British Columbia. Receiving no response to their shouts, the officers ran up an outside staircase to the second-floor apartment, forced open the door and entered the smoke-filled residence. Crawling on the floor, Cst. McNeill located the first victim in her bedroom. After waking the teenager with some difficulty, she assisted her outside to safety while Cst. Brown, feeling his way on his hands and knees, found an unconscious young male in an adjoining bedroom. The disoriented victim was helped out of the burning building by Cst. McNeill who had returned, while Cst. Brown remained inside to look for other possible victims until he was forced to exit due to the heavy smoke.

Geneviève Caron, M.B.
Longueuil, Quebec

On July 30, 2004, paramedic Geneviève Caron rescued a wheelchair-bound woman from a burning paratransit bus in Montreal, Quebec. Despite the thick acrid smoke, Ms. Caron rushed inside the flaming vehicle to reach the trapped passenger. Unable to get the physically impaired woman out due to a jammed platform lift, Ms. Caron picked her up from her wheelchair and dragged her to the back exit door, the only escape possible from the vehicle. Helped by others, she then pulled the victim out to safety, moments before the bus was fully engulfed in flames.

Guy Clairoux, M.B.
Ottawa, Ontario

On February 24, 2005, in Ottawa, Ontario, Guy Clairoux rescued his two-year-old son who was being attacked by three pit bulls. Mr. Clairoux was walking with his son through a park when one of the dogs jumped over the fence of a neighbouring house and attacked the boy. Without hesitation, Mr. Clairoux confronted the ferocious animal and punched it on the head until he freed the toddler from the pit bull’s jaws. Seconds later, two other dogs joined in the attack, inflicting serious injuries to the man and his child. Mr. Clairoux grabbed his son and pushed him toward his wife, who had witnessed the scene from nearby. He continued to wrestle with the enraged dogs, shielding his wife and son with his body, until neighbours arrived to help.

Luc Coutu, M.B.
Peggy McIntyre, M.B.
Lindsay, Ontario

In the early hours of July 20, 2005, Luc Coutu and Peggy McIntyre risked their lives when they confronted an armed intruder who had shot Ms. McIntyre’s friend in Lindsay, Ontario. Awakened by screams and gunshots, Mr. Coutu immediately ran to the neighbouring house to investigate. As he reached the driveway, he saw Ms. McIntyre carrying a rifle that she had wrestled away from the shooter. She then secured the gun by placing it in the trunk of her car. While she went back inside the house to care for her severely wounded friend, Mr. Coutu came face to face with the gunman who got another firearm from his truck. Without any concern for his own safety, Mr. Coutu entered the house, closed and locked all the doors, preventing the enraged assailant from coming back in. He then guided the women to a safe area of the house where he provided first aid to the injured victim. 

Dean Willis Craig, M.B.
Nanaimo, British Columbia

On May 5, 2003, Dean Craig rescued a woman who was being attacked by an intruder in her residence of Nanaimo, British Columbia. Mr. Craig was working in a shop located in the victim’s apartment building when he heard her cries for help. He rushed to the apartment and found the intruder assaulting the woman. Without hesitation, he tackled the assailant who was trying to flee, allowing the victim to run out of the apartment to call for help. In the violent struggle that ensued, the enraged attacker pulled a folding knife from his pocket and attempted to stab Mr. Craig. Alerted by the victim, a neighbour rushed to Mr. Craig’s assistance. As both men held the suspect until the police arrived, he continued to struggle and to wave his weapon until he was taken into custody.

Christopher Alan Duggan, M.B. (posthumous)
Prospect, Nova Scotia

The decoration awarded to Mr. Duggan will be received by his father, Mr. Michael J. Duggan

On September 3, 2005, 31-year-old Christopher Duggan lost his life while saving two children, aged 8 and 12, from drowning at Stoney Beach, in Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia. While playing off a sandbar, the boy and girl were suddenly swept into deeper waters by the treacherous current. Noting that the children had disappeared from sight, Mr. Duggan entered the high surf to search for them. After spotting the girl at a distance, he battled the strong riptide until he reached her side and helped her back to shore. Mr. Duggan re-entered the dangerous waters but lost his struggle with the fierce undertow before he could locate the boy, who was ultimately towed to safety by a kitesurfer.

Bruce M. Fitzsimmons, M.B.
Union, Ontario

On January 4, 2005, Bruce Fitzsimmons rescued a man from a car that had caught fire near Cambridge, Ontario. Unsure as to whether the driver had escaped the blaze, Mr. Fitzsimmons and another motorist attempted—without success—to put the fire out.  After struggling with locked doors, Mr. Fitzsimmons used a fire extinguisher to break the passenger window. He then reached inside the car and groped around through the heavy smoke until he felt the unresponsive victim, but was driven back by the heat and flames. Undeterred, he climbed into the vehicle, released the victim’s seat belt and pulled him out and away from the blaze. He then returned to the vehicle and entered a third time to check for other possible occupants.

RCMP Constable Chad William Greig, M.B.
Surrey, British Columbia

On January 25, 2004, RCMP Cst. Chad Greig risked his life to prevent a suicidal woman from jumping off the Fraser River Bridge, near Hope, British Columbia. First at the scene, Cst. Greig managed to get close enough to the aggressive victim to grab her by her jacket to prevent her from falling to her death. Cst. Greig was partially dragged over the bridge railing by the heavy woman who repeatedly hit him to free herself from his grip. At that moment, two other police officers arrived to provide assistance. Although the woman continued her violent struggle, the three officers were able to pull her from the edge of the bridge and back to safety. 

Richard Earl Hearns, M.B.
Welland, Ontario

On July 29, 2004, Richard Hearns saved two people from a fiery death in Welland, Ontario. Mr. Hearns was in his living room when he noticed that the adjoining townhouse was ablaze. He immediately ran to the scene and, after trying unsuccessfully to alert his neighbours to the fire, he kicked the locked door open before running upstairs to search for the occupants. When he opened the door to a bedroom that was almost entirely engulfed in flames, a wall of toxic smoke erupted and activated the fire detector. This woke one man who came out of his bedroom as Mr. Hearns was assisting another tenant out of his bedroom. In complete darkness and gasping for air, Mr. Hearns then guided both men down the stairs and outside to safety.

Téodor Gheorghe Hulbar, M.B.
St-Hubert, Quebec
Asif Aly Penwala, M.B.
Longueuil, Quebec

On July 7, 2003, Asif Penwala, assisted by Téodor Hulbar, came to the rescue of his mother who was being assaulted by thieves in front of a foreign exchange office in Montreal, Quebec. Mr. Hulbar was shot in the back when he entered the melee in an attempt to stop two of the robbers from ripping a bag of money out of the hands of the victim. Alerted to the holdup from inside the shop, Mr. Penwala also intervened to rescue his mother but was slowed down in his efforts when he was pepper-sprayed by the fleeing assailants. Although seriously injured during the incident, Mr. Hulbar and the victim fully recovered from their wounds.

Michel Jalbert, M.B. (posthumous)
Nathalie Lavoie, M.B.
Saint-Eustache, Quebec

The decoration awarded to Mr. Jalbert will be received by his mother, Mrs. Thérèse Cassista-Jalbert

On July 29, 2005, Michel Jalbert lost his life while attempting to save his nine-year-old son from drowning in the Rivière Rouge, in L’ Annonciation, Quebec. The victim and his children were swimming some eight metres from shore when they were suddenly carried downstream toward a deep trench. Fighting the strong current, two of the children headed for shore while their younger brother drifted out toward powerful eddies. Seeing his son’s predicament, Mr. Jalbert swam to the struggling boy and, with failing strength, pushed him toward shore while shouting at his wife to come and assist them. Ms. Lavoie immediately dove in, brought the nearest victims back to the water’s edge, then returned for the boy and pulled him to safety. Tragically, Mr. Jalbert succumbed to exhaustion and, despite Ms. Lavoie’s best efforts, could not be saved.

Kenneth Peter Klassen, M.B.
Brent Albert McDonald, M.B.
Portage la Prairie, Manitoba

On October 28, 2003, in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba, Kenneth Klassen and Brent McDonald rescued three children trapped inside a burning house.  Informed by the mother that the children were still in the house, Mr. Klassen raced through the front door but was forced to retreat due to the heat and heavy smoke. Undeterred, he made his way back through the choking fumes and, guided by the children’s whimpering, crawled on his hands and knees until he located the six-month-old twin girls in the hallway and carried them out one by one. Alerted that a third child was missing, Mr. McDonald, together with Mr. Klassen, ran back into the house to rescue the six-year-old boy, whom they found hiding in a closet under a pile of coats.

Constable Stephen Knight, M.B.*
Mount Pearl, Newfoundland and Labrador

On February 18, 2004, Cst. Stephen Knight, of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, rescued a suicidal teenage girl who had jumped from the railing of a pedestrian bridge into the Bowring Park’s Waterford River, in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. Dispatched to the scene, Cst. Knight leaped over a fence and climbed down the snow-covered embankment towards the river’s edge. He then jumped into the frigid water and waded until he reached the pool in which the girl was trapped, her head below the surface. Battling the fierce current, he managed to grab the teenager and make his way back towards shore, where others had arrived to provide assistance.

* signifies a second award of a Medal of Bravery.

RCMP Corporal Joseph Denis Laflamme, M.B.
Ottawa, Ontario

On June 19, 2003, Cpl. Denis Laflamme prevented a man from taking his own life during a protest in Ottawa, Ontario. Cpl. Laflamme was monitoring the demonstration when he noticed a man carrying a gasoline container walking towards the group of protesters. The individual suddenly opened the canister and began pouring gasoline over his head and body, then reached into his pocket for a lighter. Cpl. Laflamme immediately rushed forward and wrestled with the man in an attempt to seize the lighter from his hands before he could set himself ablaze. Ignoring the imminent danger of fire as he was now completely soaked with fuel, Cpl. Laflamme managed to restrain the determined protester while a bystander pried the lighter from his hands.

Azzedine Lahrichi, M.B. (posthumous)
Paul Luca, M.B.
Montreal, Quebec

The decoration awarded to Mr. Lahrichi will be received by his spouse, Mrs. Véronique Licatese

On June 6, 2004, Azzedine Lahrichi died trying to rescue his son from drowning in the Rivière des Prairies, in Montreal, Quebec. Mr. Lahrichi was fishing at the water’s edge with his son when the youngster fell into the water, close to a giant culvert. Mr. Lahrichi immediately jumped in after him but was swept downstream by the swift current. Seeing Mr. Lahrichi’s predicament, Mr. Luca dove in the turbulent water, swam some 30 metres toward the victims. He managed to grab hold of the boy but the swift current propelled them into a powerful eddy and dragged them under the surface several times. Although weakened by his efforts, Mr. Luca succeeded in pulling out of the backwash. With the boy in tow, he fought his way back until they were able to touch bottom. Sadly, Mr. Lahrichi, who had disappeared under the surface, could not be saved.

René Lemaire, M.B. (posthumous)
Île-du-Grand-Calumet, Quebec

The decoration awarded to Mr. Lemaire will be received by his spouse, Ms. Linda Belair

On June 5, 2005, 39-year-old René Lemaire lost his life while trying to rescue his seven-year-old son from drowning in the Ottawa River, in Île-du-Grand-Calumet, Quebec. Mr. Lemaire was fishing with his three sons when the young victim slipped off the dock. Although he could not swim, Mr. Lemaire jumped into the four-metre-deep water but disappeared under the surface and drowned before he could save his son. Witnesses who had heard the shouting boys were able to pull the young victim to safety, but not his father, whose body was recovered by the authorities the next day.

Christopher Mervin, M.B.
Chatham, Ontario

On November 7, 2004, Christopher Mervin risked his life to rescue three people from a burning apartment building in Strathroy, Ontario. Responding to a call for help, Mr. Mervin raced to the nearby house, which was quickly filling with smoke. Hearing the victims’ voices, he ran into the burning building to pull out a man trapped inside. He then returned into the house and, crawling on his hands and knees, located a woman and brought her out to safety. An attending police officer then entered the residence to look for more victims and quickly became overwhelmed by the heavy smoke. Mr. Mervin entered the structure a third time and pulled the disoriented officer outside to safety.

William Thomas Richard Nimick, M.B.
Lucan, Ontario

On October 27, 2003, then 12-year-old William Nimick was injured while helping his sister who was being attacked by a vicious dog in Lucan, Ontario. Shortly after they stepped off their school bus, the 40-kilogram animal knocked the girl down and tried to bite her face. William immediately intervened and began hitting the dog with a metal rod until it broke and he was knocked to the ground by the aggressive animal. While shouting at his sister to run into the house, William defended himself by kicking at the dog, which bit him repeatedly on the arms. Distracted by the slamming of the door, the dog finally let go of William, allowing him to escape and safely reach the house.

Ronald Clarence O’Neill, M.B.
Cambridge, Ontario

On June 17, 2005, Ronald O’Neill put himself at great risk when he saved a man from being mauled to death by his own dog in Cambridge, Ontario. Mr. O’Neill was driving home when he spotted the 80-pound pitbull tearing at the man’s arm and upper body as he lay on the side of the road. Hearing the victim’s call for help, Mr. O’Neill stopped his vehicle and, without regard for his own safety, engaged the attacking animal, punching and kicking it several times in the head until it released the seriously injured man. The dog suddenly turned on Mr. O’Neill, who managed to fend it off. While keeping the growling animal at bay, he then carried the victim to the safety of his truck. The police arrived moments later and were eventually forced to shoot the dog.

Justin Don Pierro, M.B.
Cache Creek, British Columbia

On July 17, 2005, Justin Pierro rescued a 12-year-old boy from drowning in the Thompson River, at the junction of the Bonaparte River, in Ashcroft, British Columbia.  While fishing with friends, Mr. Pierro noticed the panicked boy struggling in the middle of the fast-moving river, caught in a back eddy. When he saw the boy going under for the second time, Mr. Pierro jumped into the water and swam to him, some 25 metres out. In spite of the overwhelming force of the current dragging them down, he managed to push the victim out of the strong whirlpool and, although exhausted by his efforts, got out on his own. He was then able to bring the child back to shore, where others provided assistance.

RCMP Constable Eyvi Sidney Smith, M.B.
Whitehorse, Yukon

On October 24, 2004, Cst. Eyvi Smith risked his life to rescue a man from a burning apartment building in Whitehorse, Yukon. Directed by tenants who were evacuating the housing complex, Cst. Smith ran to the third floor to search for remaining occupants. When he entered the victim’s apartment, the smouldering fire suddenly reignited and the door shut behind him, momentarily trapping him in the inferno. Undeterred, he crawled through the thick black smoke to the living room where he located the victim, unconscious and on fire. After several failed attempts to lift the heavy man from the floor, Cst. Smith managed to drag him outside the burning apartment and into the hallway. Sadly, despite Cst. Smith’s best efforts, the fire claimed the victim’s life.

Master-Corporal Michael Thomas Stanford, M.B., C.D.
St. John’s, Newfoundland

On May 26, 2005, MCpl Michael Stanford rescued a man from a burning house at Canadian Forces Station St. John’s in Newfoundland. Alerted to the fire, MCpl Stanford entered the house to look for occupants but was quickly forced out by the heavy smoke. Using a curtain to cover his mouth and nose, he re-entered the dwelling, where he heard the victim calling from upstairs, but the flames and choking fumes drove him out again. Undeterred, he went back inside and, shouting and banging his baton on the walls, instructed the victim to follow the noise. Through thick smoke, the man located MCpl Stanford at the bottom of the stairs, and both escaped to safety. In spite of the spreading fire, MCpl Stanford raced back inside several times to search for other occupants wrongly believed to be in the home.

Eric P. Stenstrom, M.B.
Montreal, Quebec

On January 17, 2005, while vacationing in the Dominican Republic, Eric Stenstrom rescued a man who was unable to escape the pull of a strong undertow at Playa Grande. Mr. Stenstrom had just entered the water when he heard the victim’s cries for help. After first instructing the man to swim toward him—to no avail—Mr. Stenstrom fought the pounding surf until he reached his side. Battling the three-metre waves that crashed over them, he struggled to keep the man’s head above water, repeatedly submerging his own body to push the victim to the surface. Making slow progress against the powerful riptide pulling them under, he managed to bring the man closer to shore, where others helped them out of the water. 

RCMP Constable Craig Andrew Thur, M.B.
Whitehorse, Yukon

In the early hours of September 18, 2004, Cst. Craig Thur rescued an intoxicated youth who had wandered into a pond near Whitehorse, Yukon. While responding to a complaint of a noisy outdoor party, Cst. Thur heard a muffled gurgling sound coming from nearby. In complete darkness, he waded into the freezing swampy waters in an attempt to locate the source of the noise. From a distance, he spotted the young man who was struggling to stay afloat in deeper waters. Although weighted down by his uniform, Cst. Thur immediately swam in his direction. His efforts were hampered by overhanging bushes and dead tree stumps in the murky pond, but he finally reached the youth who was by then completely submerged. Cst. Thur grabbed hold of his jacket, lifted him to the surface and, although completely exhausted, swam back to shore with the young man in tow.

Kevin Anthony Venn, M.B.
Richmond, British Columbia

On July 31, 2004, in Richmond, British Columbia, Kevin Venn was savagely attacked while coming to the aid of a woman who was being harassed by her boyfriend. Mr. Venn was alerted to the screams of the woman while working at a nearby gas station and rushed to her aid. Although Mr. Venn planned to calmly intervene, the assailant turned on him, smashed a drinking glass in his face and savagely beat him before fleeing the scene.  Dazed and in pain, Mr. Venn dragged himself more than a kilometre away before police found him an hour later. While the woman was saved from being assaulted, Mr. Venn suffered deep facial lacerations and severe head injuries as a result of his valiant efforts.

David Ware, M.B.
Brampton, Ontario

On October 20, 2003, David Ware was injured when he went out to help a mother and her children who were being attacked by a vicious pit-bull type of dog in Brampton, Ontario. Witnessing the woman trying to pull the 60-kilogram dog off her five-year-old daughter, Mr. Ware got out of his car, closing the door hard to distract the animal. The dog finally let go of the girl but charged at Mr. Ware, jumping at his throat and biting his forearm and face. The man managed to pin the powerful dog down by the neck while the mother and her children ran for safety. The violent animal was eventually killed after being shot at three times by the police who had been alerted to the scene by an eyewitness. 
 

TCBF

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You can't expect the Canadian Broadcorping Castration to cover this stuff - it destroys the well crafted illusion that Canada is a country of victims.

Tom
 
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