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Leave Pass Response Time

Gsc

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Hi,

I was just wondering if anyone knew if there is any sort of time limit or 'reasonable' response time for a leave pass.

Leave passes constantly go unanswered for weeks, with the units forgetting that we are expected to wait until they are approved to book travel and trips. The delay in response causes flights to raise in price, or bookings to become unavailable, or plans not able to be made. It is more than common, even with weeks notice, to receive a signed pass just days before the scheduled leave is suppose to start, making it near impossible.

If I do my due diligence to make sure I give as much notice as possible, shouldn't there be a time frame in which I should have an answer, even a denial so I can make alternative plans?
 

dangerboy

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There is not an official time limit for response to leave passes. I would say in most cases two weeks should be plenty of time to get the approved leave pass back. If I had not gotten a response within two weeks I would talk to my immediate supervisor. If it is a busy period for example before Christmas leave it may take the orderly room longer to process leave passes but they should be giving direction such as requesting all Christmas leave passes in by xx date.

Not a great answer I know, and the issue is unit-dependent, some are good at handling admin and some are not.
 

Lumber

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I don't see why routine leave passes can't be returned the same day, or within a few days at worse.

On my ship (and most ship's I've sailed on), approval for routine annual leave was delegated to department heads. In my department, leave passes would first go to the Ops Chief. The Ops Chief would then bring me a stack of leave passes for me to sign. To avoid brining me them in ones and twos, he would wait a few days and bring them as a bunch. However, if time was of the essence, or if flights needed to be booked, he would bring them to be right away, and if there was no impact on operations, I would sign them right then and there.

So, my response would be that for a routine leave pass, a couple of days at most is reasonable, and same day should be possible.

Now, there are more complex leave passes, such as:
1. out of country leave that requires the CO's approval;
2. leave during a period of sailing/exercise where the ship/unit may not want to let you go on leave.

For case 1, its still routine, and probably should take no more than a week. We regularly passed such leave passes up to the CO through the ship's office (orderly room), and the Snr HR manager would have those back to us within about a week.

In the second case, a memo is likely required in order for the member to argue the case as to why they should be excused from sailing/training/exercise whatever. This one is more complicated, and may take 2-3 weeks for each level in the chain of command to fully consider, assess risk, and then provide their minute/opinion to the memo before sending it up the chain. The CO may then want a meeting with the supervisor to go over their justifications.
 

SeaKingTacco

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I don't see why routine leave passes can't be returned the same day, or within a few days at worse.

On my ship (and most ship's I've sailed on), approval for routine annual leave was delegated to department heads. In my department, leave passes would first go to the Ops Chief. The Ops Chief would then bring me a stack of leave passes for me to sign. To avoid brining me them in ones and twos, he would wait a few days and bring them as a bunch. However, if time was of the essence, or if flights needed to be booked, he would bring them to be right away, and if there was no impact on operations, I would sign them right then and there.

So, my response would be that for a routine leave pass, a couple of days at most is reasonable, and same day should be possible.

Now, there are more complex leave passes, such as:
1. out of country leave that requires the CO's approval;
2. leave during a period of sailing/exercise where the ship/unit may not want to let you go on leave.

For case 1, its still routine, and probably should take no more than a week. We regularly passed such leave passes up to the CO through the ship's office (orderly room), and the Snr HR manager would have those back to us within about a week.

In the second case, a memo is likely required in order for the member to argue the case as to why they should be excused from sailing/training/exercise whatever. This one is more complicated, and may take 2-3 weeks for each level in the chain of command to fully consider, assess risk, and then provide their minute/opinion to the memo before sending it up the chain. The CO may then want a meeting with the supervisor to go over their justifications.
If you use Monitor Mass (like our unit) and use the email notification function, there is no reason leave passes cannot be turned around within the business day.
 

Furniture

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If you use Monitor Mass (like our unit) and use the email notification function, there is no reason leave passes cannot be turned around within the business day.
I was going to say the same thing.

The other advantage with MM is that the leave pass can't magically get "lost" when you haven't heard back in weeks.
 

Jarnhamar

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I don't see why routine leave passes can't be returned the same day, or within a few days at worse.
Because subordinates need to be kept in their place.

Responding to leave requests quickly, or not sending memos back a half dozen times for minor corrections, gives low ranking members a false sense of importance.
 

dapaterson

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I know of a civilian who submitted a letter of resignation to their boss, a CDR. Who red penned it and returned it for correction.

I do recall one instance of ordering someone on leave, though. Rather than permit them to end a period of class B service a week early (and lose out on an additional day of leave that would given them another paid weekend as well), in order to support a youth group trip from their home community, as their CO I ordered them on community development leave instead, to support the youth group trip.
 

ajp

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If a leave pass is created in monitor mass, and the staff are named properly, up to approving, there’s no reason a leave pass can’t be approved same day. I review mm daily when I’m in the office and check email accordingly.
 

Furniture

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I know of a civilian who submitted a letter of resignation to their boss, a CDR. Who red penned it and returned it for correction.

I do recall one instance of ordering someone on leave, though. Rather than permit them to end a period of class B service a week early (and lose out on an additional day of leave that would given them another paid weekend as well), in order to support a youth group trip from their home community, as their CO I ordered them on community development leave instead, to support the youth group trip.
A co-worker is going through his release, had his memo sent beck for correction a couple of times on minor things.

Even when someone says "I'm out" the CAF can't help but be stupid at every opportunity.
 

dapaterson

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After submitting my release I received no corrections.

I also have received zero communication about it from my CoC. Nada. Zip. Zero. Not even a "how are you doing" or "sad to see you go". Not an appearance at my DwD.
 

kev994

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A co-worker is going through his release, had his memo sent beck for correction a couple of times on minor things.

Even when someone says "I'm out" the CAF can't help but be stupid at every opportunity.
I’m quitting whether you like the memo or not. The initial date still stands, and the release section is getting more upset with you the more this drags on.
 

Good2Golf

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Even when someone says "I'm out" the CAF can't help but be stupid petty and vindictive at every opportunity.

@Furniture, you were being kind describing the institutional CAF…

After submitting my release I received no corrections.

I also have received zero communication about it from my CoC. Nada. Zip. Zero. Not even a "how are you doing" or "sad to see you go". Not an appearance at my DwD.

@dapaterson, the CAF’s uncaring ignorant Yin to its petty and vindictive Yang…
 

Navy_Pete

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If you use Monitor Mass (like our unit) and use the email notification function, there is no reason leave passes cannot be turned around within the business day.
Unless MM doesn't actually send out indications to the supervisor/approving authority; it can be finicky. It works great when it does though.

But normally, unless someone is on holiday or something a few days (from when they know it's there) would be reasonable to get approval in a Reg Force unit.

Argh; Edit to add; The lead time to getting confirmation back it's been entered into Guardian can be insane, I've been getting them back long after the leave period, but once it's actually signed by the approving authority I use that for booking things.

I think our BOR is down to a very small cell for the number of folks it supports, so the Guardian entry is done when they get windows around all the other admin. It's apparently still a handraulic process, which is on brand for the CAF for a fully digital form going into another digital system to not automate it, but spend insane person hours doing it instead.
 

Kilted

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I know of a civilian who submitted a letter of resignation to their boss, a CDR. Who red penned it and returned it for correction.

I do recall one instance of ordering someone on leave, though. Rather than permit them to end a period of class B service a week early (and lose out on an additional day of leave that would given them another paid weekend as well), in order to support a youth group trip from their home community, as their CO I ordered them on community development leave instead, to support the youth group trip.
I know of someone who ended up staying in the reserves for an extra two years because his release memo kept getting rejected.
 

Jarnhamar

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Maybe we'll see LEAVEFORGEN next. Where we can use our vacation days whenever we want instead of whenever it's convenient for the unit.

Currently a lot of units get pissed off when people don't take leave, then get pissed off when they ask for it.
 

SeaKingTacco

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If your unit has an operational role, it is a bit awkward when the key folks (which is just about everyone, these days) puts in leave when the operation happens.

It is legit for the CO to control when leave can/cannot be taken, but they had better be upfront about when the embargo period are.
 

dapaterson

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I know of someone who ended up staying in the reserves for an extra two years because his release memo kept getting rejected.
Depending on the timeframe, that may have resulted in additional RFRG entitlements / potentially pushing them over thresholds...
 
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