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Lee Valley Tools "Reuse Your Shippable Boxes" Initiative

Loachman

Former Army Pilot in Drag
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Yes, it obviously benefits Lee Valley Tools by getting people to buy things from them, but it's also a novel and worthwhile way to do it - and I always have a list of things to buy there anyway plus my lady is constantly ordering things from "the swoopy arrow company":

"During this pandemic, many of us have rediscovered taking long walks through our own neighborhoods. While moving about on foot, there’s plenty of time to notice the things you’d normally drive right past without seeing. Garbage day is particularly revealing – it’s hard not to notice which of your neighbors buys what, or from whom.

"For me, what really sticks out is the number of clean boxes that have only been used once. A large number of them have a swoopy arrow sort of logo that just seems to shout “give this box another trip.” While recycling is great, reusing before recycling is even better!

"So, for the rest of the summer, we’ll give you a 50 cent per box credit against purchase for each clean and carefully broken down reusable shipping box you bring to one of our open stores. If you happen to have a

"Lee Valley box, we’ll take those too!

"You’ll be doing a good thing for the environment, getting some direct financial benefit, supporting a local business, and who knows…maybe the swoopy arrow company will take note and find a creative way to reuse their own packaging."
 

lenaitch

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Yea I have a hard time tossing a good box. must be my inner Scots...

My dad, between a Scots background and growing up on a farm during the Depression, kept everything, including only slightly bent nails. It made cleaning out his house after he passed a real hoot. He had his high school report cards (not pretty) and every income tax return back to the '40s. And he relocated in the '70s so had to consciously move it all.

It also might be part of an age thing. The last few months we have found ourselves looking at something and wondering aloud 'is there a use for this?' and realizing we must stop.
 

dapaterson

Army.ca Relic
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I don't have that problem because why would you throw out a good box? You might need it some day, like when you have to pack up and move to a bigger house, so you'll have more storage room for all those boxes.
 

OldTanker

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After 17 “paid”military moves we eventually had to pay for a move, at approximately $1/lb, which caused us to dispose of approximately four tons of stuff we didn’t need. Our latest house has limited storage space so we have a policy - for everything that comes into the house, something of equal bulk had to leave. It’s sort of working 😜
 

lenaitch

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After 17 “paid”military moves we eventually had to pay for a move, at approximately $1/lb, which caused us to dispose of approximately four tons of stuff we didn’t need. Our latest house has limited storage space so we have a policy - for everything that comes into the house, something of equal bulk had to leave. It’s sort of working 😜

Good luck with that. The father-in-law tried that with the M-in-L with minimal effect.

On our recent couple of moves, one by us and one by a moving company, we retained all the boxes (the moving companies try to dissuade that until I remind them that I paid for them) and sold them on Kijiji in a day or two. Most of our storage is in large Rubbermaid tubs, a lesson learned living in a Victoria farmhouse with a damp stone basement.
 
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