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Light Electronic Warfare Teams, Who and What are We?

OceanBonfire

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As information technologies advance so does the Battle Space. The rapid pace of innovation increases the need for Light Electronic Warfare Team (LEWT) to adapt, and overcome these ever-changing technological advancements. Electronic Warfare (EW) is one of several disciplines combined to support the greater systems of Information Operations (IO). EW is used to monitor or deny the adversary use of the Electromagnetic (EM) Spectrum allowing us to gain better battlefield awareness and disruption of their communication at critical points in time. As members of the LEWT we are trained with flexibility and resilience in mind to meet the ever-changing needs of the Battle Space.

LEWT operators use highly sophisticated equipment and must be able to operate in austere conditions. The LEWT enables various combat effects by adding collection, processing information, analyzing and reporting on EM activities to the intelligence cycle. Operators need to extrapolate information in order to solve technical problems as they arise and ensure collection and processing of the information is accurate.

We receive training from a multitude of sources. In addition to the EW courses and equipment-specific training, the United States Marine Corps trains us in their Radio Reconnaissance Operator. Many LEWTs have also participated in training with Australia, the United Kingdom and New Zealand. These training opportunities are conducted to improve capabilities of all nations involved by sharing experiences. Other courses within our own forces include the Basic Parachutist and Basic Reconnaissance courses. Continuous training as a LEWT is indispensable. When we are not conducting online research to enhance our operator knowledge, we are engaged in a persistent physical training regimen. Training includes ruck marches, amphibious training and calisthenics; on top of the usual running and circuits.

The LEWT works in small teams usually consisting of three to five members, including members of the Regular and Reserve Force. Each member in the team have their individual responsibilities, but we are expected to be proficient at all tasks integral to the LEWT. Employment of a LEWT and the understanding of how teams are employed is just as important as knowing what we do. As LEWT, we are often attached with Operational Control (OPCON) under a reconnaissance or sniper element. In some cases, we are employed to enhance force protection by providing indicators and warnings to the supported element, such as if the adversary is about to make a strategic move based on changes in their patterns of life within the EM spectrum.

This job is highly demanding, but soldiers who take the challenge and become part of a Light Electronic Warfare Team take great pride in their job. We work closely with all branches of the CAF and must continuously adapt our training to meet mission specific requirements. The LEWT is one of the unique capabilities at 21 Electronic Warfare Regiment in Kingston, a unit within 6 Canadian Combat Support Brigade, and 5th Canadian Division of the Canadian Army.

Inveni et usurpa! Find and Exploit!

 
β€œThe last Bison finally broke. Quick, someone give me an acronym!”

Because a Bison MEWT always works perfectly well in dense urban environments and mountainous terrain...

Not all EW, DF, and SigInt operations require the same tools πŸ˜‰
 
Shit I'm not eligible for that :( only signal op and sig tech
Both noble and honorable trades to work within the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals.

We are all part of a team of inquisitive, skilled, resourceful, and dedicated professionals. We all work together to get the message passed, protect the message, and deny the enemy the opportunity to receive theirs.
 
Both noble and honorable trades to work within the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals.

We are all part of a team of inquisitive, skilled, resourceful, and dedicated professionals. We all work together to get the message passed, protect the message, and deny the enemy the opportunity to receive theirs.
Now that's a great way to put it! I'm trying to decide between Information tech and signal tech honestly, I have a software development background but don't want to be stuck to a desk constantly and I enjoy hands on work. But I also don't mind working on a computer either. Any insight to pros and cons of either occupation I mentioned above?
 
Now that's a great way to put it! I'm trying to decide between Information tech and signal tech honestly, I have a software development background but don't want to be stuck to a desk constantly and I enjoy hands on work. But I also don't mind working on a computer either. Any insight to pros and cons of either occupation I mentioned above?
I worked as a Signals Operator and as an Information Systems Tech before I commissioned. Honestly, there are pros and cons to each and it is wholly dependent on where you're posted and in which role. Some Sig Ops never see the field and some IS Tech spend more time doing Brigade Networks for their entire career without seeing the inside of an office. For opportunities, Sig Op is far more diverse in what they do compared to IS Tech. That said, IS Techs are a massively hot commodity in what they bring to the battle space; especially within our Digital Transformation and foray into AI/ML.

If you already have a background in programming, you're well ahead of the curve in the IS Tech world. Those skills may be underutilized in the Signals Operator world.

Food for thought.
 
I worked as a Signals Operator and as an Information Systems Tech before I commissioned. Honestly, there are pros and cons to each and it is wholly dependent on where you're posted and in which role. Some Sig Ops never see the field and some IS Tech spend more time doing Brigade Networks for their entire career without seeing the inside of an office. For opportunities, Sig Op is far more diverse in what they do compared to IS Tech. That said, IS Techs are a massively hot commodity in what they bring to the battle space; especially within our Digital Transformation and foray into AI/ML.

If you already have a background in programming, you're well ahead of the curve in the IS Tech world. Those skills may be underutilized in the Signals Operator world.

Food for thought.
I appreciate the insight! Lots of food for thought certainly and it's also signal tech I'm curious about as I love the idea of working on what they do and they have some information systems work as well within the trade from what I gather. That being said my fear of being stuck on a desk clicking the mouse and smashing keys all day doing IST work is pushing me toward the signal technician trade. I'd really like a mix of both hands on and some desk work honestly. I also have other trade experience like pipefitting, autobody Tech etc so I'm not afraid of hands on work either.

Would you mind elaborating a little more on the day to day of a IS Tech? What type of work can I expect mainly to be doing? I'd love the opportunity to deploy as well I just want to work and travel as much as I can. Is there much opportunity for that too?
 
I know this is probably something that nobody can really answer, but if you're an experienced senior-level computer tech with network admin and full-stack programming exposure, you think there's any chance they'd overlook a criminal record?

Still waiting for the timer before a record suspensions, but wondered if it might be worth applying anyway?
 
Short answer: probably not.

Longer answer: it depends on the nature of the conviction, and related sanctions.
 
Could you become a part of a LEWT unit being a IST tech. I'd love a challenging role like this.
Yes. Most would say no. But I have found that if you do some independent study. Show that you want to be there. Show that you have the skills. It's still possible to get where you want to go. Find the right officer. Talk to them. It's still very difficult. Especially if you're not the right trade.
I nearly didn't get where I wanted to be. They asked about oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers, and class A amplifiers. I just happened to read about class A amplifiers the night before and was able to draw a complete diagram on the white board.
 
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