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NAVCOM job duty breakdown?

brass monkey

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Information on the NAVCOM trade indicates three primary duties which are Voice communications on the bridge, electronic communications in the communications control room, and IT. Many of the posts on this site were from a number of years ago.
Some of the responses I've read on this site indicate very little IT although I see that CompTIA A+ and Network+ are part of the trades training.

What is the percentage breakdown of primary duties? 33% each or from what I've read 70% voice comms, 20% electronic comms, and 10% IT or something else entirely?

Is there an opportunity to focus in one area more than another?

Thank you for your time.
 

Lumber

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brass monkey said:
Information on the NAVCOM trade indicates three primary duties which are Voice communications on the bridge, electronic communications in the communications control room, and IT. Many of the posts on this site were from a number of years ago.
Some of the responses I've read on this site indicate very little IT although I see that CompTIA A+ and Network+ are part of the trades training.

What is the percentage breakdown of primary duties? 33% each or from what I've read 70% voice comms, 20% electronic comms, and 10% IT or something else entirely?

Is there an opportunity to focus in one area more than another?

Thank you for your time.

Not a NAVCOMM, but I would say the two biggest areas that we rely on our NAVCOMMs the most for are maintaining voice comms (not necessarily conducting voice comms), and processing message traffic. Following that would be IT.

We have a ton of different radios aboard ship, and maintaining voice comms involves ensuring that all the radios are assigned to the correct frequencies/channels, and that all of the require cryptographic equipment is working properly.

Lots of really important information is passed between various military units and HQs by what's called a "message" which is a very very military way of passing information concisely in a standardized format. Sometimes the message is administrative like a "posting message", other times is critical information such as an equipment deficiency. Some messages can be sent by email, but other messages are only considered "officially sent" if they are sent through the official message distribution network. Dozens of messages get sent back and fourth everyday to/from a ship, and it's the NAVCOMMs who process all of these messages.

Then there's the IT side of things... we do the vast majority of our work on our computer networks, and the NAVCOMMs are also responsible for that, but unfortunately it's usually left to a relatively junior sailor who may or may not have any actually experience with IT/IS.
 
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