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PTSD / OSI [Merged]

AirDet

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Wow, that sucks. The good news is that VAC makes their own assessment based on the entire picture.
 
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After a report from my MD and one from my psychiatrist, the BPA lawyer submitted the claim back for a departmental review. Now to wait a year for results from that. lol
 

fake penguin

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Like a lot of people on here I know a few soldiers that came back from Afghanistan with PTSD.

I got into a conversation with a family member who said the people who suffer the most are not the soldiers but the civilians in these conflicts.

She said the soldiers have guns to protect themselves while civilians don’t. Also civilians are forced into the situation while soldiers want to be there so it not as traumatic for them.

I get it, civilians are the ones who suffer the most in war but to turn it in to a competition on who has it worst seem weird to me.

Why do people turn something like PTSD into a competition?



 

mariomike

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May as well put this here.

Saw this lawn sign on an American website re: 4th of July.

When I was growing up, just about all the men had been in the war. Us kids never thought to ask our neighbours if they minded us and our firecrackers.

Reminds me of when my grandfather took me to a war movie. I was enjoying the show. Waiting for the big battle. He was asleep. But, when the artillery started, boy did he jump! 
 

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BDTyre

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An interesting counterpoint to that sign from Task & Purpose. It almost borders on satire where it not for some of the issues it discusses.
https://taskandpurpose.com/veteran-war-on-independence-day

mariomike said:
May as well put this here.

Saw this lawn sign on an American website re: 4th of July.

When I was growing up, just about all the men had been in the war. Us kids never thought to ask our neighbours if they minded us and our firecrackers.

Reminds me of when my grandfather took me to a war movie. I was enjoying the show. Waiting for the big battle. He was asleep. But, when the artillery started, boy did he jump!
 

daftandbarmy

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Powerful stuff, and it makes sense....

How to Reduce the Risk of PTSD in the Workplace | Darlene Illi | TEDxBearCreekPark

Reducing the risk of PTSD in your workplace can start with a plan. “Don’t wait until it is too late” says Darlene Illi, a 911 Operator for 20 years. In her talk about how preventing the pain of PTSD is far easier than treating the trauma, Darlene shares her P.L.A.N. to help us manage daily stress in our workplaces. We need to widen our view to the many faces that can fall victim to stress related illnesses. Darlene Illi.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kpe9F_razKM
 

mariomike

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daftandbarmy said:
“Don’t wait until it is too late” says Darlene Illi, a 911 Operator for 20 years.

That would be stressful. But, the ones I knew did not spend 20 years as 9-1-1 Operators aka Call Receivers.

From Operator / Call Receiver, they became Dispatchers, Patient Safety Advocates ( PSA ),  Destination Co-ordinators, Clearing Co-Ordinators, Tactical dispatcher, Out of Town Dispatcher, Seniors, Supervisors, Duty Officers.

Those are just the ones I remember. Probably some new ones since I retired. All were stressful.

But, at least they no longer dealt with the public. Although some seemed to prefer answering calls.

And, if the stress of "the fishbowl" got to be too much, - it did for some - they were transferred out and into another job.

 

daftandbarmy

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Interesting...


We train soldiers for war. Let's train them to come home, too

Before soldiers are sent into combat, they're trained on how to function in an immensely dangerous environment. But they also need training on how to return from the battlefield to civilian life, says psychologist Hector Garcia. Applying the same principles used to prepare soldiers for war, Garcia is helping veterans suffering from PTSD get their lives back.

 
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