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Quitting Smoking

Scott

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OK troops, after talking this over with some of the Staff I've decided to throw this one up here. So, here we are to share any tips you may have, medications, yoga techniques, etc. We're also putting this up so that those who are considering this form of suicide can read all about it, get a "how to" on getting addicted and see how hard it is to quit. Recently, in the Cadet forums, we've had some of the younger members of the site talking about smoking and it's time they get the facts about it from us, the ones who have sucked them back for so long.

Please note that anyone who wants to start flapping about how great it is will face immediate action from the Staff. Let's face it guys, it's just not cool and will never be. If you are content to puff away on your Exports then go ahead, do not encourage others to share in your choice of executioners.

Me, well I started smoking when I was 17 because of all the vitamins in them there lung darts. Yeah right, I thought I was being the cool guy and before I knew it I was hooked. Now, 11 years later I am faced with an addiction, the fact that I have probably taken some years off my life, made myself more prone to a plethora of unhappy endings not to mention the thousands of dollars that I have sent, literally, up in smoke.

I am in the process of quitting, I hope. I gave them up a few days ago and feel pretty good. I have had one minor relapse but have stayed the course otherwise. By no means do I consider myself out of the woods and never will I be a non-smoker. My Doctor once told me that once you have smoked that you are always a smoker. It's a dirty, rotten, deadly habit and a very troublesome addiction. Hopefully, with some support from right here, others will be convinced to give it up.

Good luck to you all.

 

paracowboy

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I've quit smoking and dippin' many times. Never for more than a few months. It's got too tight a hold on me, and I can't beat it for long. I started very young. Single digits. My Dad thought he'd cure my curiosity by giving me a drag when I was 7, and a chaw around the same time. Made me sick and dizzy. But, all my heros did it, so I refused to stop trying until I had mastered it.

Now, I'd give almost anything never to have started. I've wasted tens of thousands of dollars on a drug that is killing me. I bleed everytime I brush my teeth. I live in dread of the day my doctor/dentist tells me I have mouth cancer/throat cancer/stomach cancer. If I do contract mouth cancer, they will cut off my bottom lip. They don't replace that with anything. I've already seen my gums shrink, and developed scales on the insides of my bottom lip. My cardio suffers every time I try to quit, and again, when I inevitably start again.

When I run out in the field, or overseas, I get sick. TRULY sick. Nauseous, stomach cramps, dizzy, spots in front of my eyes, diarrhea, exhaustion the works. A doctor told me that I'd been using nicotine so long, that my body has come to think of it as its' natural state. It takes weeks to feel remotely normal. The first few weeks I start smoking/dipping again, I'm exhausted all the time, and I get sick.

I'm going to try and quit yet again. Maybe, with a mortgage, and the ever-increasing chance of losing half my face, it'll stick this time.
 

Kat Stevens

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Started at 12, quit at 18. was a "drunken smoker"  for another few years.  Quit for 10 years, then my marriage fell apart.  Crawled into a bottle, and started smoking like a fiend.  Three years later, my Dad was diagnosed with cancer of the everything, and he was dead six months later.  I quit the day he told me his diagnosis, and haven't looked at a cigarette since.  Dead parents are apparently a very effective learning tool.

RIP, love ya, Dad, me ol' marra
                         
                         
 

winchable

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Smoking for three years (a pittance in comparison to some I suppose) but God help me if sweet lady black doesn't dig her nails into me as soon as I wake up.
I used to laugh at all those commercials and studies that talk about how role models influence people to smoke but stepping back, I can safely say that at my age, I look at photos of James Dean, Steve McQueen, Eric Clapton, George Harrison, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, my Grandfather et al. with smokes in their hands and feel the weirdest urge to light up.
I suppose that (and the obvious physiological and psychological addiction) is why smoking stuck with me.

It's my crutch, it's actually so bad that if I don't smoke when I'm studying (Heatlh Science...ah the irony) my grades will drop because I can't seem to focus for the requisite 9-12 hours a day.
Of course, I've become quite good at rationalising my addiction and making deals with myself as to when I'll quit or why I "need' to smoke (the studying one is an excellent example by the way)

When I've been successful at it, I've found that it's usually because I replace it with something else, that can pretty much be anything (except for studying in my case it seems), a girlfriend, sport (although I do manage rugby still), weird hobby etc.

In short, without trying to sound like the most depressing public service announcement, it was by far the absolute worst decision I've ever made and I can connect just about every negative aspect of my life in some way to smoking.

If anyone wants to throw out some quitting stories, I think this is going to be the Official Quit Smoking thread, it'll be good for everyone trying to get out see some other tricks, hints and advice.
 

Conquistador

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I consider myself lucky that I have a father that would beat the living snot out of me, literally, if he caught me smoking. I will admit I have gone behind his back and tried smoking, but I just didn't like it too much. Also, seeing smokers on my BMQ puking their guts out after a 200 meter jog also helps keep me straight. I wish everybody luck in kicking the habit.
 

Fishbone Jones

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Started at 12, smoked for 40 years, put them down last September, cold turkey. We'll see where it takes me.
 

Adam

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http://www.dnd.ca/health/services/health_promotion/Engraph/butt_out_e.asp
 

IrishCanuck

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I am very surprised at the early ages many people appear to have started smoking at.

I've smoked a cigar twice in my short life ( im only 19) , once when i was 16, once more when i was 17, and decided that they were just gross and didn't see how people could get enjoyment or anything out of smoking.

More and more.. I realise the hold it can have over some people.. and I can only hope that in the future more young people become even more educated as to the dangers this activity presents..
 

muffin

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I picked up my first cigarette when my mom went to take a phone call - at the age of 9.  Was smoking pretty regularly by the age of 12. I quit when I was expecting my kids- but knew I would light up again as soon as they were born.

My hubby was a smoker as well which made it nearly impossible for us to quit - so we decided to do it together.

I did a full detox at the same time and found I had no cravings. I had tried the gum, patch, cold turkey, and hypnotism ... and nothing else had worked.

Now - I will still have one if I am really stressed out or drinking. This will probably be less of an issue now that everywhere is smoke free.

My dad had sucess using the Nicorette inhaler... but like so many people with the gum, has become addicted to it instead. (I suppose it is still better than smoking).

It is not an easy thing to do no matter how you do it. And you have to really want to - or else it just will not work.

muffin
 

OnTrack

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Quit three months ago...haven't had a smoke since.  Started smoking during BOTC in Chilliwack 25 years ago.  Like most people have tried to quit before and relapsed.  Used the patch this time and found it pretty "pain-free" after the first week.  I'm free and clear of the patches now and rarely (almost never think about having a smoke). 

In concert with my program bought a bike and took up mountain biking, to which I am now addicted.  Much healthier.  :)

I'm not going to turn into one of those people I used to hate - but do yourself a favour and quit.  Trust me - you'll feel better, sleep better, have a better attitude, taste food again, smell again....should have done this long ago.

Good luck to those quitting.  If you'd like some assistance quitting or someone to chat with PM me...I'd love to help you.
 

Journeyman

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paracowboy said:
.... and the ever-increasing chance of losing half my face, it'll stick this time.
I'm not a smoker. Now if you wanted to start a thread on drinking.....::)

but kids........if the thought of paracowboy losing half of that pretty face isn't enough to scare you off smoking, nothing is.  ;D
 

navymich

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Journeyman said:
Now if you wanted to start a thread on drinking.....::)
Oh God, please no (says the sailor)  ;D


But seriously, my kudos and a big BZ to those that have quit, and those too that are working on it.  I have never been a smoker, and won't even begin to imagine the addiction to it.  Thank you though for being so open and honest with your situations.  I hope that it will help many out there to quit, and even more to not even start.
 

camochick

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I'm a smoker, been doing it for a little over ten years. I love it and I hate it. I hate the fact that I always smell of smoke, that I can't go more than a day without one, and the fact it will probably kill me. But nothing beats a smoke after a big ol turkey dinner.
I am going to try and give up smoking before the husband is home, because last time I tried the poor guy was scared of me ( I have never been so cranky in my life as when I quit for a month >:D)
 

CallOfDuty

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 Hey there guys.  I smoked for 10 years off and on...everytime I would buy a pack I would say " this is my last ".  3 months before I started bmq, which I just finished in May, I stopped smoking, started running and getting in shape, felt awesome, healthier.  The minute I arrived in Montreal and waited for the trip to St-Jean, I bummed a smoke.  Then of course I smoked like a friggin chimminey the entire time during bmq. ( felt like #### each time too)
   I had a smoke at the montreal airport on the way home and when I got back home I told myself I will never smoke a cigarette ever again for the rest of my life.  That was almost 1 month ago, and I can honestly say I don't think I will truly ever touch it again.  
   For me, I try to think of it as a mental challenge........I challenge my will power every day.  I want to be able to say " yes, I have complete control".  Plus the price of cigarettes alone is enough to want to stop.  
 I will say to myself " Why am I paying the government all these hard earned tax dollars just to puff on this stinky thing"  
 Anyway thats my story....Good luck everyone, and be strong.
Cheers
Steve :cdn:
 

Springroll

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Had my first puff at 14 and got hooked almost immediately. Quit July 2004 using Zyban and was a non smoker for 10 months before stress about my husband's health got me hooked again. Smoked a pack a day until 6 weeks ago when both my husband and I quit cold turkey. We had enough of spending $550 a month on cancer sticks, and he had a serious surgery coming up that we felt would go better if he was a non-smoker...and so far it has!

I have turned to eatting salads and beading when I get a craving for a cigarette.
I wish everyone who tries, the best of luck. This is a real hard habit to quit and you need to be prepared to stumble every once in a while.

I am feeling great after 6 weeks.... ;D
 

TN2IC

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This is day 6 for me.... I really feel like I still want one. But I am still here.. did'nt kill anyone yet.
 
C

couchcommander

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http://tobacco.mededu.miami.edu/tobacco/studyPlan/slides/4-lip%20ca%20without%20print.jpg

*caution* not for young or sensitive eyes.

Just one of the possible outcomes of smoking.
 

Scott

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Due to someone's absoloute lack of thought I am going to reiterate what I said in the first post of this thread:

Scott said:
Please note that anyone who wants to start flapping about how great it is will face immediate action from the Staff. Let's face it guys, it's just not cool and will never be. If you are content to puff away on your Exports then go ahead, do not encourage others to share in your choice of executioners.

Clear?
 

OLD F of S

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    Springroll was there any adverse effects with the zyban?





                            Regards OLD Fof S

 
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