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Reimbursement for driving suspension

DARTAGNAN

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Hello,

in  January 2017 I was suspended of driving for cardiac risk and I had to wait 10 months to see a cardiologue to tell me I was fine which I already knew since I had sent my tests to my personal civilian cardiologue way before. I got no financial accommodations during all that period. I don't feel I should be penalized because of the doctor's decision.

What should I do ?
 

Blackadder1916

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Since a number of factors that you have not provided would be necessary to make an informed suggestion, perhaps you can answer the following.

What province do you live in and was this the province that suspended your license?

Was the physician who informed the licensing authority military (it doesn't really matter) and in what province was he licensed to practise medicine?

If you are Regular Force, why do you have a "personal civilian cardiologue"?

What do you mean by "no financial accommodations"?

You are aware that in most Canadian jurisdictions, physicians (even ones in or employed by the military) are required by law to immediately report to applicable civilian motor vehicle departments any medical conditions that could affect the ability of an individual to safely operate a motor vehicle.
 

DARTAGNAN

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I live in Manitoba and yes from Manitoba.

The military physician informed the insurance and they sent me a letter.

I consulted my family cardiologue, the one my family consult because nobody want to get me a second advice.

I had to pay crazy bills just to go the work, not counting getting grocery done and far more. It ruined me.
 

ModlrMike

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As far as I know there is nothing in the CBI (Compensation and Benefits Instructions) that addresses payment for routine travel expenses due to health issues. That is not to say that there is no entitlement. I would recommend that you engage your chain of command for help.

The Manitoba Motor Vehicle Act is crystal clear in impsing an obligation of medical practitioners to report to MPI when drivers may not meet the standard for driving. That being said, it is not the medical provider that suspends your license, rather MPI based on a review of the specifics of the case.
 

Zoomie

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I know plenty of CAF members that live in Manitoba and don’t have a drivers license either - they use taxi and bus services.  No accommodation provided to them either. 
 

JesseWZ

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DARTAGNAN said:
I live in Manitoba and yes from Manitoba.
The military physician informed the insurance and they sent me a letter.
I consulted my family cardiologue, the one my family consult because nobody want to get me a second advice.
I had to pay crazy bills just to go the work, not counting getting grocery done and far more. It ruined me.

A monthly bus pass in Winnipeg in 2017 was $90.50. If $90.50 extra a month ruined you, you may have other factors in your life you need to take the reigns on. The military already provides a competitive salary, comprehensive health coverage, and a variety of other benefits. At some point, one has to take responsibility for ones own life choices and their own finances. Consider if you were able to drive, you'd have to pay for insurance, maintenance and gas through that time period. Those expenses easily outpace a bus pass. Yes - driving is more convenient, it's true, but sometimes things are how they are.

Personally, I'm fortunate I live in an area where I can cycle to work almost year round. There are definitely mornings where I get up and do not have the motivation to be wet, cold, tired, or a combination of all three to start my day, but I push through because it's cheaper and better for me.
 

Pusser

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For a number of reasons, I tracked all of my vehicle expenses in 2017 and it came out that I spent around $8500 just to operate a 12 year-old pick-up truck that was paid off a long time ago (admittedly, there were a few "mid-life refit type expenses).  Nevertheless, I can't help but think that I could have taken a lot of buses and taxis for that $8500.
 

dapaterson

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And that's $8500 after taxes.  So about $15000 before.

What would you do for a $15000 pay increase?
 

Pusser

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dapaterson said:
And that's $8500 after taxes.  So about $15000 before.

What would you do for a $15000 pay increase?

Unspeakable things...
 

CountDC

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I gave up the van and resorted to walking, cycling, public transit and the occasional rental vehicle.  A lot healthier physically, less mental stress without worrying about a bloody vehicle and more money in our account.  Convenience I guess is a matter of perspective as I am finding it a lot more convenient to not have a vehicle. Parking, insurance, maintenance, gas station open - not a concern.
 
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