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The Sleep Superthread- Apnea/ Disorders/ etc.

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Mud Crawler

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I believe you guys gotta go to bed at 11pm and wake at 5, right?Well when u first joined the forces, did u guys have difficulty adjusting ?
 
H

Honi soit qui mal y pense

Guest
Mud Crawler,

The late nights and early mornings are usually only for course and on ex. I don‘t think that anyone in battalion (although I stand to be corrected) follows this routine in garrison.

Nevertheless, on course, it can be very demanding to stay alert, perform the physical tasks required of you, and practice good coursemanship when you are dog tired. Most people get used to it quickly, and it becomes a fact of life.

Don‘t underestimate the value of coursemates. When everybody is in the same boat and pulling together, it doesn‘t matter if you haven‘t slept in days; you‘ll get the job done. One more thing; everything looks better in hindsight. If you are lucky enough to have a good course, you will look back on it and your coursemates with fond memories and might catch yourself wishing you were back there (usually only the really insane think this way).

Good luck

Civitas et Princeps Cura Nostra
 
F

fusilier

Guest
Yes you adapt to getting six hours sleep. You usually don‘t even get that, because you have to shine your boots and get ready for next morning‘s inspection.
When you‘re in the field you‘ll get little or no sleep, you‘re supposed to get four hours forced rest per day, but sometimes you don‘t. Weekends off will definitely mess you up, because all you‘ll want to do when you get home is sleep. So come Sunday night when you get back to base, you can‘t sleep. Before I joined up, I had to have atleast 8 hours sleep at night to function properly, now I have no problems working with only six hours sleep. Even five will do. There‘s a point where you get tired enough that you don‘t care about pain and stuff like that. Hey, sleep deprivation can kill you after six days. It‘s funny after two days without sleep, you start seeing things at night. One time a sergeant of mine rented a pink bunny suit during an Infantry QL3 final ex. He walked right in front of the recruits in plain sight, through fields and such. The instructors all had a good laugh when they saw the amount of people who reported seeing a pink bunny and those who clearly thought they were hallucinating from sleep deprivation, and refused to report it.
 

Michael OLeary

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You might laugh, but it is a striking example of how quickly and fundamentally sleep deprivation and exhaustion can affect soldiers (or their commanders).

On courses you have to keep in mind that some exercises are for teaching, and troops need to be well-rested even on the fourth or fifth day to be absorbing the new material you are delivering. Test exercises and unit training may have other objectives, but the bottom line is that rest routines are a basic and necessary part of field training.

Also remember that exhausted leaders cannot make swift and rational decisions with consistency, nor can they effectively motivate tired troops.
 

Brad Sallows

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Adding to that, I am amused by the impression held by leaders and followers alike that the people at the top end of the chain should necessarily deprive themselves of requirements (mainly sleep) until those lower down are satisfied. This is generally a sound leadership philosophy, of which my interpretation is that it prevents neglect. However, it is also in the interests of the soldiers to ensure the leaders make sound decisions. Fortunately most NCOs recognize when to encourage the junior officers to get some rest (something all 2I/Cs should add to their list of responsibilities - remind the I/C to get some sleep). I would be very reassured if the unit CO or brigade commander received 8 hours rest each day even if I only had time for 4.
 

jlf6

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  I put a search up for the topic and found nothing so I figured I would try my luck with the most overworked part of the military... the infantry. 
    Basically I would like to start a threat on various tips and tricks for dealing with drowsiness caused by sleep deprivation.  On those long excercises when you are running on about 2 hours of rack a night for like 2 weeks what are some you your guys tricks for staying awake and alert on sentry?  What about while doing a recce and you are lying in the same position for a long period of time?  Caffeine pills?  Stabbing yourself with yourself with your bayonet to illicit a sympathetic nervous system response? (j/k)  Anything you guys might be able to offer would help the majority of us newer troops.
 

chrisf

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Caffeine pills aren't any good, in the short run, they'll keep you awake, in the long run, IE more then a couple of days, you'll just wind up more tired, and dehydrated/sick to boot.

Chewing gum helps a little, more so at night. Generally being healthy and in good shape helps the most. Also, never forget the old saying "When in doubt, rack out".
 
D

dutchie

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I find a brew up when I'm real groggy or even a hit on the ol' flask keeps me going at 0-dark-stupid (non-alchoholic...of course   ;)). As well, making sure I don't pound the caffiene constantly throughout the day helps too - save it for when you need it.

Finally, you'll get used to sleep deprivation. It takes some mental discipline and you'll eventually develop your own tricks and potions. Of course, a healthy fear of a boot upside the head from your Section Commander if he finds you sleeping should help too!

Good luck, stay awake, and watch your arcs.
 

winchable

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I now sleep on average 2 hours a night so I can help you out here.

Nothing, absolutely nothing that you can eat, drink or smoke will do much. It requires mental discipline like caesar said.
Activity is the best thing to do, keep yourself busy and you'll never sleep.

Dealing with the sdie effects of that is another thing...
 
S

Stomper

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Although I may never have been that sleep deprived (I wasn't infantry), when I was really feeling the effects of not having enough sleep I always just tried to avoid making myself comfortable, especially on sentry. I would try to stay kneeling rather than sitting and just kept looking around rather than continuously focussing on one spot.  Also, I tried not to allow myself to get nice and warm by bundling up (but not too cold either).

But, also, I have never been sleep****ed for longer than a week so my technique might not apply for longer than that.

I found some of the toughest times to stay awake were during some of those boring classes while on course (the ones that you know you won't be tested on).
 

KevinB

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Its been working for the last 14years for me...  ;D

Obviously you cannot mainline it into your veins all times, but you can use the above to help during period of extreme stupour...

After 72hrs the body begins to crash - nothing much more you can do mentally - then you need to start looking at suplements - but get ready to pay the piper at the end.

I have done about 5days of less than an hour a night - and I was a zombie and sleep for nearly 48hrs after that - I was stungout and hungover on caffiene.

I find chewing redman both gives me a slight nicotine peark and the chewing keeps me moving enough I cant nod off.



 

Matt_Fisher

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I will second what Kevin said about chewing tobacco to keep awake.

For someone like me who doesn't smoke and only chews to keep awake, it does wonders to keep you up.

The only downside is that if you haven't chewed in quite some time, it can really give you a bad headache, upset stomach or diahorrea and it tends to dehydrate you because of the increased salivation.  I don't think that the occasional chew for keeping you awake is enough to get you addicted, but everybody's different.
 

winchable

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Right, I think we could modify a camel back for this dilemma.

First, get an IV drip from the hospital,
Insert the IV drip into camel back with drip needle coming where mouth hose would have come.
Fill the Camel back with a solution of diluted caffiene.
Insert IV whenever you feel sleepy.

Ta da
 

Gouki

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I should give that idea a try.. because it gets so boring here at the GSH (the gym) that sometimes I'll have to snack on M&M's to keep my sugar up so I don't fall over and knock myself out on my desk.

Interestingly enough, I have been curious about this question for the last few weeks now as I want to learn how to keep awake/fight sleep for obvious reasons. I asked a few 2VP's an hour ago a few minutes after I saw this question, and they all - except for one, basically said "light up"

The one guy who didn't recommend lighting up a smoke didn't smoke himself, and instead said that if its winter he tries to keep his face cool enough to fight off sleep, and if its summer he puts some sort of oil or some junk under his nose and when he inhales it keeps him sharp. I wish I could remember exactly what it was he puts there but from a practical point of view it looks like it has its benefits..after all we're always breathing, so a strong smell could work wonders - albeit most likely give you a big headache in the process.
 

Art Johnson

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The best thing is a good buddy. I'm one of those guys who if he gets his head within 6" of the horizontal goes to sleep. The most popular phrase I used to hear was "for goodness sake wake up", or something like that. Ambush patrols were not for me I had to keep moving.
 

rifleman

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jlf6 said:
  I put a search up for the topic and found nothing so I figured I would try my luck with the most overworked part of the military... the infantry.  
    Basically I would like to start a threat on various tips and tricks for dealing with drowsiness caused by sleep deprivation.   On those long excercises when you are running on about 2 hours of rack a night for like 2 weeks what are some you your guys tricks for staying awake and alert on sentry?   What about while doing a recce and you are lying in the same position for a long period of time?   Caffeine pills?   Stabbing yourself with yourself with your bayonet to illicit a sympathetic nervous system response? (j/k)    Anything you guys might be able to offer would help the majority of us newer troops.

The bayonet trick would work better if you had someone else stab you evertime you looked like you were nodding off.
 

foerestedwarrior

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One thing i liek to keep with me, is the penut butter/honey/jam pakets from IMP's. I just suck on one when i get groggy, keeps me awake. Or the best one yet, in a defensive, with your fireteam partner, with helmets on. We ran head first into eachother, well our head/necks were so sore, that we couldnt sleep for the rest of the night.

Oh, and not sleepong for more than four days, causes irreversible brain damage. Its the magic rule of 4.
 

mo-litia

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Well, it's zero dark thirty and I'm still awake - anybody out there know a good cure for insomnia?  :crybaby:
 
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