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Trudeau Popularity - or not. Nanos research

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Did you see Charlie Angus’ riding in Timmins-James Bay?

He used to solidly command that riding. Now, he is in deadheat with the CPC.

Bet you he is ”thrilled” with the NDP stand on gun control…

Not really the current government in power, but it seems some feel there are no other important issues to deal with.


I guess private member bills don't have to be vetted through AG lawyers for the Charter compliance.

Charlie sticks with the Climate Emergency - MP for the Ring of Fire
An opportunity for the local FN to get a footing and backed by the Ontario government but Trudeau's Feds less enthused.

Poilievre making supportive noises about FN business development.


But there is a risk that the Climate Emergency is cresting and the Ring of Fire opportunity might be slipping away.



Charlie is looking at the prospect of the Fossil Fuel FNs in the west becoming wealthy while his Hard Rock FNs lose their best opportunity in a century and continue to struggle. The right thing for Charlie to do, for his constituents, is to continue to talk up the Climate Emergency.

My own opinion -

I am a believer in "All of the above". Energy is fundamental. The cheapest source of energy is the best source of energy - and that is likely to vary from place to place.
 






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Urban Reserves - Free Trade Zones


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Locals make their own tax policy


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How long before the existing cities demand the same degree of tax freedom as the FN Urban Reserves? How long before the existing cities gain autonomy from their parent provinces?
 
How long before the existing cities demand the same degree of tax freedom as the FN Urban Reserves? How long before the existing cities gain autonomy from their parent provinces?

There is not much 'on reserve' that is better than 'off reserve'. Sadly.



Social Conditions of Indigenous Peoples in Canada​


 
There is not much 'on reserve' that is better than 'off reserve'. Sadly.



Social Conditions of Indigenous Peoples in Canada​



Current situation demands improvement. That means some kind of change has to happen. But change on its own is no guarantee of success. It only presents some different possibilities - which could all go horribly wrong. But might be better than the current situation.
 
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Locals make their own tax policy

That's not the way I read it.

"The opt-in program would permit First Nations to collect 50 per cent of the federal taxes paid by industrial activities on their land, with industry getting a tax credit in exchange."

That just sounds like the federal government revenue-sharing. It sounds like matters such as tax policy, rates, etc. would still be in the hands of the federal government.

How long before the existing cities demand the same degree of tax freedom as the FN Urban Reserves? How long before the existing cities gain autonomy from their parent provinces?
They could try but they wouldn't have Charter provisions on their side.

Some In Toronto argue for autonomy. It would be an interesting constitutional fight. They would have to be a province, there is no 'not-a-province' unless they want to become a federal territory.

Seeing as Ontario 'invests' several billion in Toronto, mostly in transit, it would interesting to see how they would make that up from a local sales and income tax. Then again, they would become a member of the federal transfer program. I won't if they would be have or have not.
 
Justin Trudeau's attacks on Pierre Poilievre not working, poll suggests

The Abacus Data survey, provided exclusively to the Toronto Star, suggests a 19 point lead for the Conservatives over the governing Liberals, with the support of 43 per cent of those polled compared to 24 per cent.
By Stephanie LevitzDeputy Ottawa Bureau Chief - 10 Feb 24

OTTAWA—Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberals keep taking punches at Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, but a new poll suggests they aren't landing.


The Abacus Data survey, provided exclusively to the Star, suggests a 19-point lead for the Conservatives over the governing Liberals, with the support of 43 per cent of those polled compared to 24 per cent.

The three-point jump for the Tories since the last time Abacus surveyed comes as its latest poll shows the government's approval rating is down by four percentage points, with 59 per cent of respondents saying they disapprove of the job Trudeau's government is doing.

In the survey, Abacus sought to probe people’s perceptions of the Trudeau Liberals, putting five phrases to respondents to see which they thought best described the party — including whether the government is focused on the right priorities, listens to Canadians and is transparent and accountable. For each, more than 40 per cent said "not at all."

The poll surveyed 2,398 adults between Feb. 1 to 7. Online polls cannot be considered truly random, but a comparative random sample of this size would have a margin of error of plus or minus two percentage points 19 times out of 20.

"Overall, the results are not good and underscore just how challenging the environment is for this government and Mr. Trudeau," Abacus Data CEO David Coletto said.

From a cabinet retreat in late January through to the past week, the Trudeau Liberals have upped their attacks on Poilievre to tamp down his momentum with voters.

Just ahead of Abacus going into the field, Trudeau tried to link Poilievre to the right-wing rhetoric of U.S. TV host Tucker Carlson, and accused Poilievre of siding with apologists for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

After Alberta Premier Danielle Smith unveiled policies to restrict medical options for transgender youth, Liberals castigated Poilievre for not speaking up against them, accusing him of being indifferent to the lives of kids.


Trudeau's team also tried to undercut Poilievre's accusations that the government is responsible for high grocery prices, pointing out that the firm of his chief adviser Jenni Byrne has lobbied for Loblaws. The firm has lobbied for the grocery giant in Ontario but not specifically about food prices.

Poilievre and the Conservatives have been punching back. To the accusations on lobbying, they put together their own list of former and current members of Trudeau's inner circle who've also lobbied for the company.

They've blasted Trudeau for using transgender policies as a dangerous wedge issue, and also put the government on its backfoot over its main message for the last week — promised measures to combat auto theft.

Just before the Liberals could unveil a new plan, Poilievre unveiled his own, forcing the Liberals on the defensive.

In an interview with Citytv on Friday, Trudeau sloughed off the current polling landscape for his party in general, pointing out the next election is still a year-and-a-half away.

"We were way behind in the polls before the 2015 election where I won a majority, we were way behind in the polls before the 2019 election. Polls go up and down," he said.

The Tories did, in the end, vote against an updated free trade deal with Ukraine — that vote is the reason Trudeau accused Poilievre of being a Putin apologist. Poilievre insists it is because of the carbon price reference in the deal, and his party still backs Ukraine.

While Trudeau brought that up too in the Citytv interview, signalling his party won't let that issue drop, Coletto said the risk for the Liberals in general is that no one is listening to Trudeau anymore.

"They can’t cut through because most people aren’t listening anymore to Trudeau and until they start spending money on direct-to-voter advertising, that will be the case,” he said.

"The fundamental problem facing the Liberals is not a popular Conservative leader they need to bring back to Earth. It’s their unpopular leader who the country is largely tired of."


Poll here: Conservatives lead by 17 over Liberals in latest Abacus Data poll. - Abacus Data

January 11, 2024

From January 4 to 9, 2024, Abacus Data conducted a national survey of 1,500 adults exploring several topics related to Canadian politics and current events as part of our regular national omnibus surveys.

Conservatives gain 4 points since mid-December and now lead by 17 over the Liberals.

If an election were held today, 41% of committed voters would vote Conservatives with the Liberals at 24%, the NDP at 18% and the Greens at 4%. The BQ is at 33% in Quebec.

1707665773945.jpeg
 
I wonder who funds Charlie's campaigns? He can't think this up on his own.....
Well, he's not going to bring a bill to the floor without singh's permission and I'm sure they have a committee to pour over the language, etc before it's presented. To me, it looks like the whole party was privy to it. It'll be interesting how the provincial wings try explain it to their constituents.
 
No names, no pack drill ;)

Total cost of ArriveCan 'impossible to determine' due to poor record-keeping, AG report finds​

Previous reports suggest there were irregularities in the app's procurement process​


The final cost of the controversial ArriveCan app is impossible to determine due to poor financial record-keeping, a new auditor general report has found.

It is just one of the findings that Canada's Auditor General Karen Hogan highlighted in a damning report about the pandemic-era tool.

Overall, Hogan found that the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and Public Services and Procurement Canada "repeatedly failed to follow good management practices in the contracting, development and implementation of the ArriveCan application."

 
No names, no pack drill ;)

Total cost of ArriveCan 'impossible to determine' due to poor record-keeping, AG report finds​

Previous reports suggest there were irregularities in the app's procurement process​


The final cost of the controversial ArriveCan app is impossible to determine due to poor financial record-keeping, a new auditor general report has found.

It is just one of the findings that Canada's Auditor General Karen Hogan highlighted in a damning report about the pandemic-era tool.

Overall, Hogan found that the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and Public Services and Procurement Canada "repeatedly failed to follow good management practices in the contracting, development and implementation of the ArriveCan application."

And the hits just keep on coming. I can't believe Trudeau still thinks he should continue to lead.
 
That's not the way I read it.

"The opt-in program would permit First Nations to collect 50 per cent of the federal taxes paid by industrial activities on their land, with industry getting a tax credit in exchange."

That just sounds like the federal government revenue-sharing. It sounds like matters such as tax policy, rates, etc. would still be in the hands of the federal government ...
I read it the same way, too. The way it reads according to the Info-machine (also archived here):
... an optional First Nations Resource Charge (FNRC) that enables First Nations to take back control of their resources and money. This is a First Nation-led solution to a made-in-Ottawa problem. First Nations and the First Nations Tax Commission developed the plan, brought it to Conservatives, and we accepted. This new optional model will simplify negotiations between resource companies and First Nations. The FNRC will not preclude any community from continuing to use other existing arrangements, such as Impact Benefit Agreements. First Nations can choose the FNRC to replace the financial component in Impact Benefit Agreements or supplement IBAs, as they wish. The FNRC will respect all treaty rights and all constitutional rights—including the Duty to Consult ...
The bit that intrigues me from the info machine is this:
... The Indian Act hands over all reserve land and money to the federal government. This means that First Nations have to go to Ottawa to ask for their tax revenues collected from resource projects on their land ...
I don't know of many mines or oil fields within reserve boundaries, but it'll be interesting to see the details of enabling legislation to see how they deal with "traditional territory" (to oversimplify, off-reserve land adjacent to the reserve typically & historically used for hunting/fishing/harvesting) - who defines it, and what letting a FN collect taxes on traditional territory activities means re: other stuff FN's will be able to do on the same land. Not to mention what getting $ from stream x means about money that typically comes via transfer payments. AND FNs have to agree to more industrial activities in their traditional territories. Still, good to see some details coming out re: "here's how we would do things."
 
Oil and gas fields on reserve lands exist.




 
Oil and gas fields on reserve lands exist.




I knew it wasn't zero (after all, there's a whole bit of Club Fed dealing with nothing but managing all things on-reserve oil/gas stuff), but thanks for the reminder of the out west element.
 
Oil and gas fields on reserve lands exist.




And those reserves tend to be much better reserves in almost every measurable way, at that
 
There is not much 'on reserve' that is better than 'off reserve'. Sadly.



Social Conditions of Indigenous Peoples in Canada​


A lot of that is self-inflicted. It's been a easy street for Band Councils to blame everything on the government/whiteman. Except a lot of their members are going tired of that type of governance and are demanding better of themselves.
 
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