• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Weapon Locating Radar System and Carrier

MedCorps

Sr. Member
Reaction score
20
Points
230
Not sure if anyone has seen this on MERX but an LOI (W8476-070006/A) came out a week ago or so for a new Medium Range Radar for Weapon Locating complete with Carrier. 

Specs being requested are ARTHUR'esqe.  The LOI reads as follows:

Nature of Requirement: Medium Range Radar (MRR)
ID: W8476-070006/A

The Department of  National Defence (DND) has a requirement for Medium Range Radar (MRR) systems. The main function of  the MRR will  be to detect and locate indirect fire weapons, such as artillery, mortars, and  rockets across the continuum of operations including against asymmetric adversaries. This procurement activity is intended  to acquire 8 to 10 radar systems and associated  logistic support.

This project intends to procure a medium range radar system to detect hostile projectiles and locate its origin so that land forces can take appropriate action.

The system uses radar to track rockets, mortars and artillery, in combination with meteorological and geographical data, to locate the originating weapon.

The intent of this Letter of  Interest (LOI) is to confirm the commercial availability of systems that meet the criteria identified herein. It is the goal of the Government of  Canada to minimize to the greatest extent practicable the technical, schedule and cost risk associated with procuring a MRR. Consequently, candidates are asked to provide test results and data including the source to substantiate the performance claims of the proposed Medium Range Radar (MRR) systems.

Interested parties will be required to demonstrate:

1) that the proposed system locates mortars, guns and rockets out to a mandatory range of 15 km. Interested parties should submit a Blake chart [a range calculation worksheet first devised by Lamont Blake in 1962]  to substantiate their claims;

2) that the proposed system locates mortars, guns and rockets out to a ...range of 30 km. Interested parties should submit a Blake chart to substantiate their claims;

3) that the proposed system has a minimum range of 1 km or less to start detecting mortars, guns and rockets;

4) that the proposed system has an accuracy of location for mortars and guns equal to or better than 50m Circular Error Probable (CEP) (50%) out to 15 km;

5) that the proposed system has an accuracy of location for rockets equal to or better than 60m CEP (50%) out to 15 km;

6) that the proposed system is capable of searching and locating in a 360-degree sector in azimuth;

7) that the proposed system should have the potential to perform an airspace surveillance mission;

8) that the proposed system can record and digitally transmit location data;

9) that the proposed system has a remote operation capability allowing the operator to be a minimum distance of 100 meters from the vehicle;

10) that the proposed system can be setup and in action by four persons within 20 minutes; and

11) that the proposed system has similar protection and mobility, as the support LAV III manoeuvre elements.

This Letter of Interest (LOI) is used to identify potential bidders in order to identify price, availability and the ability of the equipment to meet the criteria described above.

Price and availability data will be used only to support the budgetary estimation process necessary in order to seek effective project approval from the Government. The data is to include:

  a.  RADAR equipment costs;
  b.  Ancillary equipment identification and costs;
  c.  Training cost for operators and technicians;
  d.  Spares cost for two years training;
  e.  Engineering support cost for two years;
  f.  Field support representative cost for two years; and
  g.  System and vehicle integration costs (includes integration of the Radar with
        the existing C2 system).

It is the intent of the Government of Canada to seek Industrial and Regional Bene- fits (IRBs) in the acquisition of  the Medium Range Radar, in the order of  100% of contract  value. This is to consist of  high quality,  Direct  and  Indirect  Industrial Benefits in the form of  IRB transactions that comply with Canada's IRB policy.  In addition to the commitment of  100% contract value, of  which 60%  must  be in the form of  allocated  transactions, potential  bidders would be required to submit IRB plans for Small Business Development and Regional Distribution.

Interested parties should expect  that any future requirements  resulting  from this LOI will include a contract security clause and possible security requirements.

Interested parties are requested to advise of  their interest by submitting a response to this LOI in writing (2 copies) to the Contract Authority prior to 12:00 pm, April 24, 2008, as follows:

<Blah Blah Deleted>

I hope all you locating fokes enjoy, not sure if a MilCOTS  (AN/TPQ-36 or EQ-36) meets the requirements of this LOI.  We will see what is offered up by the bidders. 

Enjoy,

MC 

 

STA Gunner

Jr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
0
MedCorps said:
Not sure if anyone has seen this on MERX but an LOI (W8476-070006/A) came out a week ago or so for a new Medium Range Radar for Weapon Locating complete with Carrier. 

Specs being requested are ARTHUR'esqe.  The LOI reads as follows: ...

6) that the proposed system is capable of searching and locating in a 360-degree sector in azimuth;

7) that the proposed system should have the potential to perform an airspace surveillance mission;

9) that the proposed system has a remote operation capability allowing the operator to be a minimum distance of 100 meters from the vehicle;

These are significant departures from thet ARTHUR system.  EQ36 will work, as will a couple of other considerable systems out there.
 

Old Sweat

Army.ca Fixture
Donor
Reaction score
56
Points
480
The following story which appeared in the Ottawa Citizen on 2 January 2009 is reproduced under the fair comment provision of the copyright act.

Army shopping for radar to warn of missiles, bombs

Forces set to spend $50 million on system to help keep troops safe


By David PuglieseJanuary 2, 2009
 
The Canadian Forces is looking to spend at least $50 million on a new radar to warn troops about incoming rockets and mortar bombs.

The new program follows an earlier attempt that saw $33 million spent to lease a similar system, but that project produced mixed results.

This time around, the army is looking for a radar that has a range of up to 30 kilometres and can be quickly set up by several soldiers.

In Afghanistan in 2003-2004, the Canadian military had leased a radar, dubbed Arthur, from Sweden, but soldiers complained it had mis-identified friendly aircraft and electrical power lines as incoming enemy rockets. Out of 3,200 incidents the radar identified as enemy fire, only two could be confirmed as real, according to a report filed by Canadian military personnel.

At the time, the army shelved plans to purchase what were known as counter-bombardment radars, citing the concern that the technology was not developed enough to make their use practical. It decided to wait until the U.S. military figured out what it would do in terms of such technology.

But now, the Canadian army has revived its plan to purchase such radars. A contract for a new system is expected sometime in 2010, but it is unclear whether the equipment would be delivered in time to protect Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has stated that Canada will withdraw the bulk of its troops from Afghanistan in 2011.

Afghan insurgents have fired Chinese-made rockets at Canadian soldiers as well as mortar rounds and homemade rockets.

The new system would not only warn that a warhead was incoming, but also determine the location from where it was fired from.

The Citizen asked the Defence Department in November for comment on the radar project, but received no response. It is now common practice at the department not to respond to questions about how money is being spent on equipment.

Defence insiders, however, say the army wants up to 10 radars.

Several firms with Ottawa-based offices are expected to bid on the project.

Lockheed Martin officials say they will offer Canada its EQ-36, a new radar system now being developed for the U.S. army.

Mark Starr, Lockheed's vice-president of radar programs, said Canada has requested information on the radar, which can detect and locate mortar, artillery and rocket fire. "We're very interested in making our system available to the Canadian army," he said.

Raytheon Canada intends to offer its improved Sentinel radar, which can detect rockets and mortar rounds and other aerial threats at longer ranges.

Luc Petit, business development manager at Raytheon Canada, pointed out that the Sentinel is being used in Iraq by the U.S. army and is also being used by the British military. Mr. Petit noted that Raytheon can also offer a land-based gun system that can be integrated with the radar and used to destroy incoming warheads.

Gary Hollink, president of Saab International Canada, said the firm will offer the army an advanced version of its Giraffe radar, which can provide 360-degree detection and tracking of incoming warheads. Mr. Hollink noted that the Canadian navy already uses a version of the radar on its Halifax-class frigates.

He said the army could install a Giraffe at Kandahar airfield and "provide coverage and surveillance to a very significant range."

In 2006, Saab acquired the company that built Arthur, the artillery and rocket detection radar used by Canada earlier in Afghanistan.

Despite the ongoing problems with that system, the army concluded that Arthur did provide "a psychological morale booster for soldiers living in camp" since the troops knew that a radar was available to warn against incoming warheads.

 

McG

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
247
Points
680
STA Gunner said:
These are significant departures from thet ARTHUR system.  EQ36 will work, as will a couple of other considerable systems out there.
I've heard Giraffe AMB may also be able to fit the dual-role of AD and weapons locating.
 
Top