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weight fluctuations (loss) during/after basic

k Paracowboy,

I will agree to disagree with you on that one...for reasons other than how you look or performance ability...but let's not pick fly shit out of pepper here  ;D

HL
 
Hot Lips said:
k Paracowboy,

I will agree to disagree with you on that one...for reasons other than how you look or performance ability...but let's not pick fly shit out of pepper here  ;D

HL
weight is immaterial and irrelevent. Body mass composition is important. Two people each weight 200 lbs. One is an Edmonton Eskimo, the other is a devout follower of the Church of the Holy Fatass. One is fit, the other is not. They weigh the same.

Weight is immaterial, and the bizzarre obsession with it is what leads to stupid fad diets, chemical abuse, and eating disorders.
 
paracowboy said:
weight is immaterial and irrelevent. Body mass composition is important. Two people each weight 200 lbs. One is an Edmonton Eskimo, the other is a devout follower of the Church of the Holy Fatass. One is fit, the other is not. They weigh the same.

Weight is immaterial, and the bizzarre obsession with it is what leads to stupid fad diets, chemical abuse, and eating disorders.
Now that's what I am talking about but BMC encorporates weight ;) and that's wherein the flyshit lies...:D

HL
 
While related, (sort of) mass is not the same thing as weight. Weight has meaning only when an object having a specific mass is placed in an acceleration field, such as the gravitational field of the earth.

Therefore, while someone may have the same mass here, or on the moon, their weight changes drastically.

People fail to understand that weight means nothing in terms of fitness. And therein lies my continuing frustration. Would you care that you weighed 350 lbs, if you could run a marathon with a Volvo on your back, and looked like Jenny McArthy? Probably not. Just as I wouldn't care if I weighed 82 lbs but could benchpress an elephant and outrun a Lamborghini.

For a soldier, it's about performance, not appearance. Substance, not surface.
 
But this thread is about weight fluctuation...there is one about fitness elsewhere  :p

HL
 
when I first started my application process I was 6 2", 155 pounds. After months of working out like a lunatic and taking protein powder several times a day I'm up to 175-180. I'm going away to basic in August and am really worried about shrinking back down to my skinny self. I'm willing to bet they won't let me bring my protein with me so I'm just wondering what kind of food they feed you there and whether or not theres a limit on the food.
 
Tyrone_88 said:
am really worried about shrinking back down to my skinny self.
don't. Don't worry. Your body will find the muscle/fat composition ratio it needs to perform. Anything else is just ego-gratification. You can add/lose muscle/fat once you've completed your training. For now, just focus on learning and graduating. Nothing else. Once you're in BN, you can think about putting on muscle, or losing fat.

I'm willing to bet they won't let me bring my protein with me
there's a debate on that point, and some troops who have first-hand experience were involved. It's in the training forum, I believe. Run it through SEARCH, and you should find it.

so I'm just wondering what kind of food they feed you there
healthy food, and tasty for the most part.

and whether or not theres a limit on the food.
not on the food, but on the time available to eat it.
 
Ok, so once I'm done training I can use Protein and possibly Creatine?
 
From a ex-body builder to someone that wants to "put weight on"...

If you want to gain weight, consume at least 4,000-5,000 calories a day, at least a couple weeks before you go off - you'll probably have to work yourself up. And don't worry about "balancing percentages" - you won't have time to do it on BMQ, and it will drive you insane if you do. Just eat...and go for seconds and thirds IF your body says it wants more. Gove for 5 glasses of chocolate milk if it says so.

This will give your body time to also adjust internally as well...you will be consuming food at an awesome rate when you activity level suddenly goes through the roof. It will literally have to re-wire itself, and how it consumes nutrients...something that can give you gas, cramping, headaches, and even leave you fatigued or tired - which you do not want to have to go through, because the change in envirionment in BMQ will be stressful enough both mentally and physically.

If you're skinny, your body will need a bit extra fat for your muscles. So even if the weight you do put on initially is water and a bit of chub...it probably won't matter for your build (chances are you won't put significant amount of fat on) but you will put enough on that your muscles will have the immediate energy they need when the shit hits the fan and your body is screaming at you to adjust to the new level of physical activity you are subjecting it too.

You will find that at the end of BMQ the chubby one's will be thinner, and the skinny one's will be bigger. And it's not due to a secret, special combination of foods...what does it is just your body adjusting to it's new environment, and the fuel you give it.

You will be very fit, though...so when you do get out you can pursue a body building regime during your daily workout time (you will get about an hour a day to hit the gym on company time) to put more permanent weight on. That's the key...

Learn to eat...

 
For what it's worth, have found that people who are body builders don't always become the best recruits / soldiers.  The special food supplements they take are not always available while in the field ..... and their body mass sometimes limits their flexibility..... they get hurt.

The small wiry guys do just fine!

IMHO
 
Paracowboy, true that about weight not being super important, but its easier than me posting all my lifts if you know what I'm saying. I'm quite exceptionally weak in terms of strength, I have high muscular endurance (pushups/situps) but poor strength objectively (I'm weak compared to my peers).

So, if I were to have this body composition at 30 lbs heavier I would be stronger objectively thereby of course making a better soldier (carry more easier, muscular strength is linked to steadied hands, etcetera).

One of my worst qualities in terms of soldiering is of course my lack of physical strength, so to increase my performance I must increase muscle mass and weight is one of the indicators of that. I could post my lifts if anyone wanted to give me some advice.
 
Zertz said:
Paracowboy, true that about weight not being super important, but its easier than me posting all my lifts if you know what I'm saying. I'm quite exceptionally weak in terms of strength, I have high muscular endurance (pushups/situps) but poor strength objectively (I'm weak compared to my peers).

So, if I were to have this body composition at 30 lbs heavier I would be stronger objectively thereby of course making a better soldier (carry more easier, muscular strength is linked to steadied hands, etcetera).

One of my worst qualities in terms of soldiering is of course my lack of physical strength, so to increase my performance I must increase muscle mass and weight is one of the indicators of that. I could post my lifts if anyone wanted to give me some advice.
strength is not necessarily linked to size. I know a li'l tiny slip of a girl who squats waaaayyyy more than I. She's a figure skater. I'm over 220lbs.

Now, if you are that concerned with gaining size, as well as strength and power, we have a different situation than the recruits earlier in the thread.

To avoid having them follow the advice given to you, as it would be at cross purposes, I suggest we take it to pms (as well, I strongly suggest anyone else who wants to give you advice on gaining mass and strength ALSO keep it to pms. Let's not have the kids concentrating on the wrong stuff, if we can avoid it.) So, pm me, and we can talk muscle-stuff!
 
I'm about 5' 8'', 205 and according to the Forces BMI chart, about 40-50lbs overweight.

It's definitely not all fat, I can tell you that, but I do carry a bit of extra padding these days (I was 135lbs until I turned 19).  I expect to lose maybe 30lbs during training but I really have no idea.

I had a person I know tell me he lost 50lbs during Marine boot camp and he went in fit. :eek:  That seems a little out there but this guy is a straight shooter as far as I can tell.  He also has said he lost 50lbs in Iraq due to dysentry (I'm assuming after he gained some weight back after basic).

 
paracowboy said:
strength is not necessarily linked to size. I know a li'l tiny slip of a girl who squats waaaayyyy more than I. She's a figure skater. I'm over 220lbs.

Okay so I am not the only one in the same boat...  :rofl:

I admit she was pretty cute.

Cheers,
TN2IC
 
Para, i agree and disagree with you as well, in that yes while you are there, its tough noogies deal with it, like everyone else did before you...personally i went in 215lbs at 5'8 (10-13% bodyfat) and i finished at 195lbs and i looked just a lil pudgier. but afterwards i just went back to training and proper eating...and got myself back up to 210.

What i disagree with you in is that weight/mass whichever you chose, is all about ego.  I also disgree with you about the being 82lbs and benching a car thing....if i was that small but that strong...i would definitely get bigger, because 82lbs...geeeez you get blown by a strong wind lol
 
Dood:

GIVE IT A REST.  THESE POSTS THAT YOU ARE RESURRECTING ARE OVER A YEAR OLD!

And besides, some of the people whom you are critiquing probably know a HELL OF A LOT MORE THAN YOU ON THE SUBJECT MATTER.  (Paracowboy being one of those people).

You are quickly losing credibility here and really p*ssing people off with your know it all attitude.
 
when i was still with 1 RCR i used to keep a set of work dress and combats that were normally too small for me. After a long exercize, i'd lose at least 10 lbs and my uniforms wouldn't fit when we we got home. After a few weeks back in garrison, I'd start wearing my size 4 reg mediums again.
 
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