Author Topic: Politics in 2017  (Read 87547 times)

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Offline George Wallace

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #550 on: July 08, 2017, 16:13:58 »


I think it got lost in translation.....  [:D
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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #551 on: July 08, 2017, 23:12:36 »
Click bait as a source?

Really?
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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #552 on: July 09, 2017, 10:40:28 »
The magic of the internet:  you can always find ANYTHING you want to say there!

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Offline Blair Gilmore

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #553 on: July 09, 2017, 12:16:02 »
I was fortunate to meet three top Canadian political movers and shakers this past week, Andrew Scheer, the CDS, and LGen (Ret'd) Romeo Dallaire. It is always good to meet people like this in person to gain the full measure of the person. A couple of quick facts, Scheer is a tall man, army CDS men are all short, and Mr. Dallaire still has some fire in the belly. If you're interested in my full impressions of these accomplished Canadians, you can read about it below:

Apologies but the moderators would rather the full post instead of a link outside of this forum. Let me know if you would prefer the full text here or if you would rather a link.

Men to Aspire To

I was fortunate this week to meet three men whom I would confer celebrity status to. What is depressing is in all likelihood very few Canadians would be unable to identify them and what they are known for. How about you, could you name the Leader of the Official Opposition, the CDS and the former senator best known for his work to rid the world of child soldiers?

I drove an hour to meet Andrew Scheer at a Conservative BBQ out in Brookfield, NS last Monday. He was in my top three for my balloting choices for the new leader and I wanted to see what kind of man he was in person. Well, he’s a tall fellow. For some reason that doesn’t come across when you see him on TV during House of Commons question periods. He’s definitely a family man who has a passel of kids, five, all about 12 and younger. I had a chance to say hello to his wife and had a few words with the older son, who I found to be quite intelligent and able to hold a conversation. Mr. Scheer did the obligatory speech for the crowd but kept it short and light. When I shook his hand, I had to rib him about his Roughriders losing to my Bombers during the inaugural game at the new Regina stadium. All in all, he seems like a decent prairie boy and I am happy he is the new Leader of the Conservative Party of Canada.

Through my Royal United Services Institute of NS connections, I was able to attend the Chief of Defence Staff’s unplugged talk about the new Canada Defence Policy. General Jonathan Vance has an impressive pedigree starting from joining back in the 80’s, to commanding troops in Afghanistan, to making it as the top soldier in the Canadian Armed Forces. He is not a tall man but neither were his army predecessors Gen Rick Hillier or Gen Walt Natynczyk. I have met a few CDS’s over the years, the first one at CFB Summerside, PEI. I got to carry Gen John de Chastelain’s briefcase for a short period of time while he was visiting the air base. Gen Hillier was attending an Officer’s Mess function at 19 Wing Comox in support of a Boomer’s Legacy event. He definitely held rock star status. As for Gen Natynczkk, I was the OPI for a large mess function in his honour. He had been up for a flight with the Snowbirds and was a little green around the gills from the experience. It is always good to hear from these movers and shakers of the military as their vision by definition shapes the future of the military. Gen Vance is a consummate public speaker and was firm in his belief that contrary to the skeptics, the Defence Policy will hold the CAF in good stead for the next twenty years. I also liked the fact that he had little patience for a retired Major who was spouting nonsense over the recent ‘Proud Boys’ incident. I liked what I heard from the CDS and I feel the CAF is in good hands.

The last man that I was honoured to meet in person for the third time in my life, was LGen (Ret’d) Roméo Dallaire. It was close to a decade ago when I first met him giving a talk about Rwanda and child soldiers at the Syd Williams Theatre in Courtenay, BC. He took the time to greet as many people as he could to sign copies of his ‘Shake Hands with the Devil’ or to listen to your comments. It was obvious to me that he had the ghosts of a million Rwandans on his conscience. I met him again when he and a group of fellow senators came through Venture, the RCN training school in Esquimalt, BC for MARS officers, for a tour. Now, a few years later, I jumped at the chance to meet him again as he was giving a talk about his Dalhousie University program, Veteran Trainers for the Eradication of Child Soldiers (VTECS). Again, it must be a thing with army officers, he is not a large or tall man. Simultaneously, he comes across as frail and tough as nails. You can tell that he memorized his talking points long ago and they come off his tongue as old, familiar friends. He is also a man who doesn’t brook any guff and adroitly told a questioning twerp to ‘F’ himself after accusing him of war crimes. It has become popular for the supporters of the Rwandan perpetrators of the genocide to twist the massacre to shift blame to the retired general. This conspiracy theory has been thoroughly debunked along with the blame that the general was responsible for the deaths of ten Belgian peacekeepers at the start of the genocide. It is disheartening that along with the ravages of his PTSD, the man must put up with these unfounded accusations. As for his PTSD, according to his last book, ‘Waiting for First Light’, it seems as if death may be his only final release. I was quite impressed with the book and felt it was the best of his three works to date. I made a point to handwrite a thank you note and was able to deliver it to him at the end of the presentation. There was recognition in his face when we shook hands, even though our past meetings were very brief. I would have to say that he is a hero of mine and it has been a pleasure to make his acquaintance.

I have been a student of leaders of men for many decades. Hence, I have no interest in the show boaters or narcissistic selfie takers. It is a good week when you can meet powerful men in person to see what they are made of.

« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 21:21:43 by Blair Gilmore »

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #554 on: July 09, 2017, 12:44:53 »
I notice that the apolitical friends I have outside of the army are all furious about the payout to Onar Khadar. If this sort of anger is sustained (or stoked by the opposition), then the Liberals could be facing some real problems in the election.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #555 on: July 09, 2017, 13:18:23 »
That election,  sadly, is a ways off.  Will this still be a hot button topic for folks (myself excluded) come then?  I will be expressing my displeasure at the ballot box without question but I'm not sure about the general public.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #556 on: July 09, 2017, 13:39:37 »
While I agree about the time frame, there may also be an accumulation of outrage combining events like this, the "Refugees" (I witnessed another outpouring of anger over that from people as varied as a Bangladeshi taxi driver in Kingston to my own wife) and the possibility of some terrorist events taking place in Canada (like the would be jihadi who was killed in Strathroy in August 2016, and event I'm sensitive to because his apparent target was the Galleria Mall in London, ON where my son was at the time).

Remember Donald Trump became President because he read the growing frustration of American working and middle class people over issues like security, jobs and immigration and could articulate these issues in forms which translated well into Social Media and could be given directly to millions of potential voters (MAGA, ripping up unfair trade deals, building a wall). If enough of Canada's middle and working class are feeling frustrations about Liberal mismanagement (and especially if they are feeling the consequences in the form of lowered income, reduced purchasing power, diminished opportunities and feeling insecure against terrorism), then this approach will have dividends for the opposition, if they are willing to tailor their approach and not "just" try to play Trump lite.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline ModlrMike

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #557 on: July 09, 2017, 14:16:04 »
I notice that the apolitical friends I have outside of the army are all furious about the payout to Omar Khadar. If this sort of anger is sustained (or stoked by the opposition), then the Liberals could be facing some real problems in the election.

That election,  sadly, is a ways off.  Will this still be a hot button topic for folks (myself excluded) come then?  I will be expressing my displeasure at the ballot box without question but I'm not sure about the general public.

It may not matter in the end. I wager within the first week of the writ being dropped, the self described enlightened faction will throw out the "R" word and set the tone for the entire campaign.
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Offline mariomike

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #558 on: July 09, 2017, 14:42:23 »
(like the would be jihadi who was killed in Strathroy in August 2016, and event I'm sensitive to because his apparent target was the Galleria Mall in London, ON where my son was at the time).

Do you have a source for that?

If you do, I will add it to this discussion,

RCMP prevent attack - 10 Aug 2016 
http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=123793.25
7 pages.

Aaron Driver "intended target"
https://www.google.ca/search?q=%22aaron+driver%22+%22intended+target%22&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=dX1iWYOuFYiR8QfvjoCQCg&gws_rd=ssl
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 15:02:11 by mariomike »
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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #559 on: July 09, 2017, 15:31:16 »
the possibility of some terrorist events taking place in Canada (like the would be jihadi who was killed in Strathroy in August 2016

Remember Donald Trump

The wannabe was home grown though, not an import and I can't lay him at the PMs feet.  I truly hope we don't have a serious incident here but should that happen I believe it will depend upon the circumstances and response to it that will be judged at the ballot box.   

It also will depend upon what the POTUS   does and world events between now and then.  The country may want more Donald here  by a Team Blue win but then it might be a poisonous idea too.  For my thinking right now there's too many imponderables from here to there.  If a week is a long time in politics, the stretch to 2019 is an eternity.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #560 on: July 09, 2017, 23:51:05 »
Do you have a source for that?

If you do, I will add it to this discussion,

RCMP prevent attack - 10 Aug 2016 
http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=123793.25
7 pages.

Aaron Driver "intended target"
https://www.google.ca/search?q=%22aaron+driver%22+%22intended+target%22&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=dX1iWYOuFYiR8QfvjoCQCg&gws_rd=ssl

http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/rcmp-says-it-received-credible-information-on-potential-terrorist-threat-public-not-in-danger/wcm/cf21979b-58a2-4718-affb-f304384d020c

Citi Plaza is the "official" name. I certainly ope that we don't see another incident like this, but as I learned years ago in economics, people follow incentives, and if you incentives behaviour, you get more of it. Getting them million dollars for committing an act many of us went to Afghanistan to stop (or kill the animals who did that sort of thing) is a pretty powerful message to send.....
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline mariomike

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #561 on: July 10, 2017, 08:28:36 »
http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/rcmp-says-it-received-credible-information-on-potential-terrorist-threat-public-not-in-danger/wcm/cf21979b-58a2-4718-affb-f304384d020c

Citi Plaza is the "official" name.

Thank-you for your source. It's dated National Post 11 Aug 2016:

"Toronto Transit Commission spokesman Brad Ross said Thursday the service had been “made aware of a terror threat investigation yesterday morning, but it had no specifics attached to it, including city or location. We took the opportunity, however, to remind our workforce that if they see something, say something and to be vigilant at all times. That is standard operating procedure at the TTC.

Metrolinx, which operates the Go Transit system, said it was also told of a general threat “which was not specific to our agency or a location as far as I understand. In response, we raised our level of vigilance and worked closely with national, provincial and local security and police services on our response,” spokeswoman Anne Marie Aikins said."

National Post 20 Aug 2016

"The target of his alleged attack has still not been determined, he added. While Driver had told the taxi driver to take him to Citi Plaza in London, Ont., there is no indication that was the target and Cabana noted there was a train station near the mall.

“Was he going there to hop on the train? We don’t know yet
so we’re doing the forensics on the computer, hoping that we’re going to find something there but so far we have nothing,” he said."
RCMP Deputy Commissioner Mike Cabana

http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/aaron-drivers-more-powerful-bombs-never-detonated-rcmp-says-revealing-new-details-of-tense-confrontation/wcm/034c5249-744c-4092-8021-c2befc768bd9
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 09:02:01 by mariomike »
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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #562 on: July 15, 2017, 21:13:24 »
http://nationalpost.com/opinion/mark-mcconaghy-trudeaus-failure-to-commemorate-liu-xiaobo-proof-that-economic-self-interest-canadas-only-goal-with-china/wcm/53826f03-2d5d-444c-b891-daca44286270

Mark McConaghy: Trudeau's naked economic self-interest dishonours a hero of Chinese democracy

Canadian leaders do these Chinese citizens a tremendous disservice by refusing to publicly critique the web of repression they live through everyday. Such advocacy must begin with the prime minister
 
Special to National Post
July 14, 2017
8:35 PM EDT

On the same evening that Canadian Governor General David Johnston met with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing, Chinese democracy activist Liu Xiaobo died under guard in a hospital in Shenyang. As Johnston expressed his appreciation for President Xi “making time for us,” Liu passed away in silence, his body wracked by a cancer that was revealed to the public only after it was largely beyond treatment. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau didn’t acknowledge or commemorate Liu’s death in any way, not even on Twitter. This was in keeping with his silence regarding Liu’s case over the last few weeks, even as China’s refusal to allow Liu to seek medical treatment abroad became known to the world.

Though Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland would later release a statement commemorating Liu, it also avoided directly criticizing China. Instead, Freeland notes passively that Liu “spent many years imprisoned for peacefully exercising his right to speak freely, was denied the opportunity to travel to receive his 2010 Nobel Peace Prize, and more recently, in his final days, was denied the medical treatment he requested.” Trudeau’s failure to deliver a statement, coupled with this bland comment from the foreign affairs minister, compounded the sense that Ottawa is loath to say anything that will upset leaders in Beijing - a reticence no doubt related to the next round of exploratory discussions set to begin in two weeks regarding a potential free trade deal between the two countries.

Trudeau's failure to deliver a statement about Liu compounded the sense that Ottawa is loath to say anything that will upset leaders in Beijing
 
The Liberals’ failure to critique their counterparts in Beijing shows that it is naked economic self-interest, rather than any larger commitment to a shared democratic future, which defines this government’s handling of the China file. Were it not so, Trudeau would have commemorated Liu, a veteran of the 1989 democracy movement, who fought tirelessly for human rights and political reform in China. In 2008, Liu bravely spearheaded the Charter 08 campaign, a movement for genuine systemic reform in the country. The Chinese regime only confirmed the power of the Charter when they chose to suppress all traces of it, jailing Liu on the charge of “inciting subversion of state power.” His case has had a tremendous “chilling effect” on China’s intellectuals, as they have largely accepted the regime’s demand that no open critique of China’s one-party system appear in their work.

The Trudeau administration may believe that they are doing both China and Canada a service by refusing to comment on such issues. After all, as the Beijing government often says, are these not China’s domestic affairs, ones that foreign nations have no right to intervene in? Yet to accept Beijing’s logic on such matters flies in the face of a central Canadian value: the free exchange of ideas across cultures.

More importantly, it does nothing to empower those young people in China who are searching for a means of transitioning their country away from authoritarian governance. Such young people have fewer and fewer outlets for global interaction. On the same week that Liu died it was reported that the Chinese government plans to block all Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) throughout the country, starting in early 2018. VPNs allow internet users to securely access private networks and share data through public networks. If the government does block them, vital digital lifelines to international news and global cultural trends will be severed. 

It is little surprise, then, that with their digital ecosystem dominated by state media, the question of Liu’s legacy remains a fraught one for China’s netizens. When the news of Liu’s death broke, many Chinese wrote indirect expressions of condolence on the popular social media site Weibo, calling him a Doushi (a warrior). Yet others claimed that Liu was not worth remembering. They argued he was a false Junzi (the Confucian term for a cultivated man) who had sought fame by undermining the party and the state. While Liu has been praised for his courage in Taiwan and Hong Kong, in the Mainland, the battle over his legacy has only just begun.

Canadian leaders do these young people a tremendous disservice by refusing to publicly critique the web of repression they live through everyday. Such advocacy must begin with the prime minister, who remains the only Canadian leader with a global platform large enough to have a sustained impact. As tens of thousands of young Chinese move to Canada to study and live, and with millions more on campuses across the Mainland eager to engage with Canada, the ethical imperative to articulate what Canada can mean for China in the realm of ideas and values is more urgent than ever.

In an era in which one tweet can cross oceans instantly, Canada’s leader must remind young Chinese citizens that they are not alone, and that different models of social governance are not only possible but essential. Such a message is the only fitting tribute Justin Trudeau can give to Liu Xiaobo and his life’s work.

Mark McConaghy is a visiting post-doctoral scholar at Academia Sinica’s Institute for Chinese Literature and Philosophy in Taipei, Taiwan. He completed his PhD studies in modern Chinese cultural history in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #563 on: July 15, 2017, 22:35:30 »
http://nationalpost.com/opinion/national-post-view-as-trudeaus-symbolic-gestures-flop-aboriginals-continue-to-suffer/wcm/d829428c-33c2-49c0-a7c3-2fa2b7cdf2f3

National Post View: As Trudeau's symbolic gestures flop, Aboriginals continue to suffer

There are dozens of reports containing hundreds of recommendations gathering dust on shelves, while the MMIW inquiry haplessly spins its wheels and descends into bickering
 
National Post View
July 14, 2017
8:33 PM EDT

It has become apparent that the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls is at risk of going off the rails. Established last September to investigate systemic causes of violence against Canadian Indigenous women and girls, the inquiry’s image has been hurt by a series of high-profile personnel departures, public condemnations by vocal Aboriginal critics (including Justice Minister Jody-Wilson Raybould’s father), and little to no progress in commencing hearings. As a recent article by the National Post’s Maura Forrest made clear, many now view the inquiry as completely illegitimate and dysfunctional.

“It lacks leadership. I think (Chief Commissioner) Marion Buller, she’s a lovely person, but she doesn’t have the skills, the management skills,” one source told Forrest. Forrest further noted, “disagreements between commissioners and employees have spawned factions, power struggles and inertia within the inquiry. ‘It’s high school, it really is. … It’s dysfunctional, and it’s not because they don’t care. They do care, they just don’t know how to do it.’”

Unfortunately, the inquiry's dysfunction was always foreseeable. It was also avoidable
 
The National Post warned from the beginning that an inquiry was no way to address the serious problem of violence against Aboriginals, and Indigenous women in particular. We have all known all along that too many Indigenous women and men live in conditions that make them especially vulnerable to violence.

The need for law enforcement to better protect these vulnerable people is abundantly clear. In October 2016, the RCMP oversight agency known as the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission completed a two-year investigation into the conduct of officers in northern British Columbia. The commission was established to understand how the RCMP had failed to protect Indigenous women and girls in that region, and has developed recommendations for addressing systemic problems in its procedures and practices.

And in 2014, the RCMP released its own report, entitled Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women: A National Operational Overview, which covers many of the issues the inquiry was established to address.

The inquiry was not really expected to unearth new causes or solutions

Meanwhile, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission spoke directly to the social causes behind the particular vulnerability of Aboriginals, offering 94 recommendations to help remedy the legacy of Canada’s residential schools, which contributed to so much social breakdown on so many reserves.

So the MMIW inquiry was not really expected to unearth new causes or solutions. Rather, its primary function was to provide an outlet for the families of victims to voice their pain and anger, and achieve some measure of healing.

But when this is the goal, it cannot be a surprise that it is impossible to satisfy all parties. Justice can mean many different things to different people. Aggrieved families will each have different views on who ought to be consulted and on what terms. Thus, it is entirely unsurprising to see so many people expressing dissatisfaction with how the inquiry is being run.

In this respect, the inquiry highlights the danger of the largely symbolic, if well-intentioned, gestures of which this government is so fond. Such actions often end up being costly, while opening up more divisions than they close.

Take, for example, the government’s recent efforts to promote Indigenous inclusion and recognition in its Canada 150 celebrations. The government’s seemingly hasty decision to turn the former United States Embassy building into an Indigenous centre was dismissed by many Aboriginal leaders on the grounds that the building was “not a culturally appropriate space.” Now, some groups are calling for a building that will not be a mere “hand-me-down,” to use the words of the Indigenous Task Force of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Earlier in its mandate, the government also reneged on its promise to enact the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples - presumably after it became apparent that it would be utterly unworkable to incorporate the UNDRIP into Canadian law. The Liberals could have avoided disappointing a lot of people if they had never made this grand, symbolic promise in the first place.

Given that the Liberal government won so much easy credit for offering little more than gestures on this file, it seems just that they’re now struggling to catch a single break. Perhaps, having been chastened by these flops, it will now see value in taking tangible action.

It could be done, and immediately. As we noted in a 2015 editorial, “58 reports (have already) contained plenty of very common-sense recommendations: Improved data-gathering …; better access to transportation, shelters and safe housing; and improved relations with police. … (B)oth aboriginal and non-aboriginal leaders have spoken of the need for comprehensive improvement in aboriginal Canadians’ lives: better and less crowded housing, education improvement, fighting addictions, job opportunities.”

Two years later, we’re no further ahead and this government isn’t meaningfully helping. There are dozens of reports containing hundreds of recommendations gathering dust on shelves in Ottawa, while the planned inquiry haplessly spins its wheels and descends into pointless bickering. If we want to protect and improve lives, enough with the gestures. Start fixing the problems.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #564 on: July 17, 2017, 11:08:49 »
That election,  sadly, is a ways off.  Will this still be a hot button topic for folks (myself excluded) come then?  I will be expressing my displeasure at the ballot box without question but I'm not sure about the general public.

I think it will, it's is a easy story to retell and can be added to some other event closer to the election, if word gets out that any of the money goes to anything that might look like hardline Muslim group, then there will be hell to pay. If there is a major terrorist attack in Canada, this will be on people's minds.

Offline jmt18325

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #565 on: July 17, 2017, 11:28:13 »
I think it will, it's is a easy story to retell and can be added to some other event closer to the election, if word gets out that any of the money goes to anything that might look like hardline Muslim group, then there will be hell to pay. If there is a major terrorist attack in Canada, this will be on people's minds.

Most of it will go to his lawyers, who have been unpaid to this point.  There's also a slightly greater than 50% chance that Khadr's conviction will be overturned in US court (probably a greater chance than that actually).  If it is, the narrative changes significantly.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #566 on: July 17, 2017, 11:39:31 »
Most of it will go to his lawyers, who have been unpaid to this point.  There's also a slightly greater than 50% chance that Khadr's conviction will be overturned in US court (probably a greater chance than that actually).  If it is, the narrative changes significantly.

I am nearly 100% certain that the Feds paid him $10.5 million, PLUS his legal fees.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #567 on: July 17, 2017, 11:58:10 »
I am nearly 100% certain that the Feds paid him $10.5 million, PLUS his legal fees.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

I don't think so.  They had to pay costs for each of the judgements in his favour, but I didn't see anything about his continuing legal fees.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #568 on: July 17, 2017, 12:03:17 »
Most of it will go to his lawyers, who have been unpaid to this point.  There's also a slightly greater than 50% chance that Khadr's conviction will be overturned in US court (probably a greater chance than that actually).  If it is, the narrative changes significantly.

His Lawyers earned it, they did a great job painting him as some sort of innocent kid. I am convinced that we interrupted a fruitful career in AQ that was mapped out for him and that he was eagerly hoping for.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #569 on: July 17, 2017, 12:09:44 »
I don't think so.  They had to pay costs for each of the judgements in his favour, but I didn't see anything about his continuing legal fees.

For once, I hope you're right.  If so, all's the more reason for the Feds to have dragged this out in court to the bitter end, as far as I'm concerned.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #570 on: July 17, 2017, 12:34:03 »
His Lawyers earned it, they did a great job painting him as some sort of innocent kid. I am convinced that we interrupted a fruitful career in AQ that was mapped out for him and that he was eagerly hoping for.

Of that, I have no doubt you're right.  His family was his main influence, and we all know where that was going.  He was a kid though, dragged away from his home at 9 to go do god knows what.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #571 on: July 17, 2017, 12:35:13 »
For once, I hope you're right.  If so, all's the more reason for the Feds to have dragged this out in court to the bitter end, as far as I'm concerned.

In that case, they would have had to pay costs, when they inevitably lost.  Don't take what I said as gospel though.  Just because I didn't hear it, doesn't mean that it didn't happen.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #572 on: July 17, 2017, 12:45:20 »
I think it will, it's is a easy story to retell and can be added to some other event closer to the election, if word gets out that any of the money goes to anything that might look like hardline Muslim group, then there will be hell to pay. If there is a major terrorist attack in Canada, this will be on people's minds.

As much as this is a hot button issue. This is what I dislike the most about Canadian Politics. It's more about being punishing an outgoing party then taking in the platform of the incoming party

Don't get me wrong, I hope this is remembered when the next election happens, but as much as I disagree with Justin Trudeau, I still don't like it when someone votes for a party for the sole reason they are not another party. This seems to play out over and over in our politics.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #573 on: July 17, 2017, 13:00:57 »
Of that, I have no doubt you're right.  His family was his main influence, and we all know where that was going.  He was a kid though, dragged away from his home at 9 to go do god knows what.

dragged? or did he follow as kids do. I don't buy the "influenced crap" He knew what he was doing and likely had a pretty good idea that his ties to Canada ended when he started making and planting bombs. I am surrounded by kids 8-12 right now and already they have a good sense of right and wrong, better than some adults.

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Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #574 on: July 17, 2017, 13:03:46 »
In that case, they would have had to pay costs, when they inevitably lost.  Don't take what I said as gospel though.  Just because I didn't hear it, doesn't mean that it didn't happen.

I will be more surprised to learn that they in fact let Khadr pay his own costs than I would be to find they wussed out and paid that too.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.