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A Psychological research for Canadian Force

nickanick

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Hi, I'm currently an undergraduate student studying psychology.
Upon my graduation, I would need to construct a quantitative research in any area of my choice.
Since my interest is in the Canadian Force, so I decide to construct a military psychology research.

Are there anyone of you out there have any interesting topics/ areas regarding the psychological aspect of CF that you wish me to construct a study?

In the moment, These are something I have thought up over night.
- Identification of Friendly or Foe under threat/stressful event. Hoping to minimize friendly fire in the theater of war.

This is not a scam,
I truly want to apply my current knowledge to aid CF in any possible way.
Please give me your insights.
Thank you!
 

dapaterson

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There are strict research protocols that must be adhered to prior to the CF providing any support to or authorizaton to participate in psychological studies.

You should probably research Defence R&D Canada and find the applicable policies prior to launching - it will save you many headaches.
 

Pieman

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I would suggest research into PTSD prevention. What can soldiers do before/during/after war to prevent and minimize PTSD.

Another question worth looking at: Does the current psychological training that soldiers undergo increase their susceptibility to PTSD? Our training digs deep down and messes with our fight/flight nervous system. The intention is to ramp us up for war, but I am wondering if this method makes us more venerable to stress injuries?

 

Pieman

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^^Could probably answer some of those questions through experiments on animals. I imagine it is easier to get animals into a fight/flight state, and easier to get the results out.  Just thinking out loud: I would put two groups of rats in a room. Every hour, I would drop some object into the room that will chase the rats around and give them a electric jolt. One group of rats will get to relax for the next hour. The other group of rats will not be allowed to relax and would have lights flashing on/off, loud noises, something to keep them a bit on edge.

....oh man, talk about an animal rights nightmare. Good thing I never went into behavioral sciences. :D
 

George Wallace

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Pieman said:
^^Could probably answer some of those questions through experiments on animals. I imagine it is easier to get animals into a fight/flight state, and easier to get the results out.  Just thinking out loud: I would put two groups of rats in a room. Every hour, I would drop some object into the room that will chase the rats around and give them a electric jolt. One group of rats will get to relax for the next hour. The other group of rats will not be allowed to relax and would have lights flashing on/off, loud noises, something to keep them a bit on edge.

....oh man, talk about an animal rights nightmare. Good thing I never went into behavioral sciences. :D

That is why I don't buy anything from the Body Shop:    "Not Tested on Animals -- Not Tested on Me."
 

Pieman

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That is why I don't buy anything from the Body Shop:    "Not Tested on Animals -- Not Tested on Me."

Yea no kidding. "We tested it on a bowl of fungus. *Should* be okay...maybe?"
 

ht90

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I have good topic for you, what about the stress sailors have to go through after 6 months of sailing  ;D
 

kstart

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Pieman said:
I would suggest research into PTSD prevention. What can soldiers do before/during/after war to prevent and minimize PTSD.

Another question worth looking at: Does the current psychological training that soldiers undergo increase their susceptibility to PTSD? Our training digs deep down and messes with our fight/flight nervous system. The intention is to ramp us up for war, but I am wondering if this method makes us more venerable to stress injuries?

There's an interesting lecture series that looks at that very topic, it's called, "You're Not In The Forces Now", by an Aussie, Viet Nam Veteran.  Psychological concepts are apparent re: "classical" and "operant conditioning" by training and indoctrination, and he is saying the same thing, re: how fight response, partial PTSD is programmed, re: hypervigilance-- and it is functional for the theatre.  Different training, would have e.g. how one scans their environment, habits, etc.  I notice this in a friend of mine who's going through the process of medical release, constant scanning (in crowded places) and it seems a bit patterned. . .?  Some veterans with OSI/PTSD are uncomfortable in crowds, obvious startle response with loud sudden noises, etc.; driving can be stressful for some. . . etc.  Problematic is when thats accompanied by flashbacks, panic attacks. . . and rage. . . and cycles of nightmares, brain-body remembers, mind has to catch . . . re-program. . .somehow. . .

The lecture doesn't go into particular OSIs, particular grief, exposures, etc., just looks at this process and impact post-deployment, PTSD.

FYI, it's on you tube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FwLpcpXNdM (Part 1)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOV9AE-MVEA&feature=endscreen&NR=1 (Part 2)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=0Dv_5wTYqvQ&feature=endscreen (Part 3)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=bfXS8fnbiH8&feature=endscreen (Part 4)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=nYDQWa8wFpc&feature=endscreen (Part 5)
 

Scott

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cupper said:
Stress of reading any of the recruiting threads. >:D

Journeyman would definitely be a good subject on this note. He's very huggy towards recruits.
 

kstart

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PMedMoe said:
You're.  Just saying....  ::)

Woops, fixed that. . .

I know a few people who've found those lectures helpful, a working perspective/context on what's been going on with them (helps reduce anxiety when starting to have a clue about what's going on and what can be done to cope with it); what's happened to them re: maladaptive PTSD-responses, post-deployment. . .  Just saying. . ..

 

Gunner98

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kstart are you aware of the new CF mental health training program?  Check it out.  We are as concerned about freeze as we are fight or flight.  Freezing in place in a fire fight is not good for you or your patrol mates.

http://www.forces.gc.ca/health-sante/ps/mh-sm/r2mr-rvpm/default-eng.asp
 

dogger1936

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Simian Turner said:
kstart are you aware of the new CF mental health training program?  Check it out.  We are as concerned about freeze as we are fight or flight.  Freezing in place in a fire fight is not good for you or your patrol mates.

http://www.forces.gc.ca/health-sante/ps/mh-sm/r2mr-rvpm/default-eng.asp

I've seen a man totally freeze under stress. Infact the man was usually a solid rock and very competent. His gunner had to take over sending the nine liner as he bumbled around.

I think the study's will find no one is safe from having issues both on and off the battlefield.

Ironic enough the guy who froze has been promoted twice since; and here I am who never had an issue while there under fire...a GD mess mentally.

War is a funny thing.
 

kstart

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Simian Turner said:
kstart are you aware of the new CF mental health training program?  Check it out.  We are as concerned about freeze as we are fight or flight.  Freezing in place in a fire fight is not good for you or your patrol mates.

http://www.forces.gc.ca/health-sante/ps/mh-sm/r2mr-rvpm/default-eng.asp

Really interesting. . .  Yes, that video I cited seemed to address more re: fight response, anger, but definitely there is more.  The video can be dated, specific to training re: Vietnam; whereas in CF training, the professionalism built into it and the per operation theatre, would be different, e.g. ROEs, etc. 

It makes sense that freeze would be a concern as well (both in theatre and post-deployment stages, etc.).  CF, R2MR program looks like it's building on "mindfulness strategies of stress response" through stages of training; pre-deploy; deploy; post-deployment-- it looks very positive.  Thanks for sharing that. :salute:

 

wesleyd

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Simian Turner said:
kstart are you aware of the new CF mental health training program?  Check it out.  We are as concerned about freeze as we are fight or flight.  Freezing in place in a fire fight is not good for you or your patrol mates.

http://www.forces.gc.ca/health-sante/ps/mh-sm/r2mr-rvpm/default-eng.asp
When was this established? I have been on three tours and not once has this happened. We got intial briefing about where we would be etc., more for the family unit. Then left, then came back. There was supposed to be a followup now that I remember but my unit cancelled it as we were getting ready for some operations.
 

Gunner98

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This program was established over the last three years and is now being taught on most leadership courses as well.
 

Gunner98

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A briefing on CF Mental Health from May 2011:
http://mediasite.otn.ca/mediasite41/Viewer/?peid=a4df2c2f12c84cf8b786c4b74f3f7e761d
The Psychiatrist In The War Zone: Mental Health Treatment Of Canadian Forces Members From Canada To Afghanistan - Major Alexandra Heber, MD, FRCPC - Psychiatrist and Clinical Leader of Mental Health,  Canadian Forces Health Services Centre (Ottawa),  Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa

 
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