• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Australian navy's hunt for new sub to replace Collins class

Underway

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
355
Points
880
The argument for nuke boats in Australia is much weaker than the one for nuke boats in Canada. Australia doesn't have a domestic nuclear industry, Canada does. Australia doesn't need under ice, Canada does. Australia is very close to its threatening neighbours, Canada isn't. Australia will do well with big conventional subs. It's the perfect environment for them in the south pacific. Big enough to hide, small enough to get where you need to go.
 

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
657
Points
910
His argument is that it was the nuclear sub fleet that really kickstarted the US civilian nuclear program and that it would likely do the same for Australia. He also feels the subs could be made there, but the reactor and components be imported. With the current agreement with the French, they could switch to the existing French Barracuda design.
 

Underway

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
355
Points
880
His argument is that it was the nuclear sub fleet that really kickstarted the US civilian nuclear program and that it would likely do the same for Australia. He also feels the subs could be made there, but the reactor and components be imported. With the current agreement with the French, they could switch to the existing French Barracuda design.
Yes the US nuke boat program did kickstart the domestic nuclear power program. However civilian nuclear power no longer needs military money to take the risk of developing new technology. If Australia wanted/needed domestic nuclear power/industry it would already have it.

The UK has problems crewing their sub fleet, those reactors need 24/7 monitoring and the RN has been forced to hire civilians for times when the subs are not sailing (with all the attendant problems of that). Australia can't even crew the subs they have and are dealing with their own shortages of skilled personnel for non-nuclear technology.
 

Underway

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
355
Points
880
Is there a Western power that is not short of trained personal?
The US. But they are also the only growing western power demographically as well. Everyone else is losing population.

Not sure what's going on in France. I don't hear too much about any personnel issues with them, but they heavily focus on reducing crewing in their ships. France as a country is also obsessed with its birthrate so their demographics are relatively stable compared to other European nations.
 

dimsum

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
548
Points
940

Australia considers German submarine option as tensions with French company grow​


The Navy has begun quietly examining whether German-made submarines could provide an interim capability for Australia before a future $90 billion French-designed fleet is due to enter service in over a decade.

The Defence Department is also considering several other drastic options, including faster upgrades to Australia's existing Collins Class fleet, which would mean lucrative submarine maintenance work would likely remain in Adelaide.

Department sources said Navy's Director-General of Submarines, Commodore Timothy Brown, recently began a preliminary study of Type 214 submarines manufactured by German company TKMS, although Defence is refusing to confirm or deny the activity.

The Type 214 is a diesel-electric submarine operated by several navies, including South Korea, Portugal and Greece, but does not meet Australia's full requirements for a future fleet to eventually replace the ageing Collins Class submarines.

One Defence figure, who spoke to the ABC on the condition of anonymity, said Commodore Brown's scoping study was being conducted solely by the Navy and separate from the department's Capability and Sustainment Group (CASG), which oversees Australia's military acquisitions.

It is understood Commodore Brown is exploring if it would be possible for the Navy to modify a Type 214 submarine for Australian purposes, well ahead of when the future French submarines are expected to be delivered.

 

dimsum

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
548
Points
940

Australia To Upgrade All Its Aging Submarines Amid Chronic Delays To Its New French Design

As Australia waits for its 12 new, controversial Attack class submarines, the country’s defense ministry has announced that it will spend around $4.6 billion keeping its current fleet of Collins class submarines viable until they can be replaced. Previous plans would have modernized just three of the Collins class, but the ministry has been forced to make the move since the first of the Attack class is not now expected to be delivered until around 2035, while the full fleet won’t achieve final operational capability (FOC) until 2054.


 

CBH99

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
302
Points
860
not a bad idea given China rising just over the horizon. I imagine the Collins class has some “old school charms” about them, as a lot of upgraded yet older diesel subs do.

The RAN pursuing 12 subs to replace their fleet of 6 is impressive and admirable. Good on them. And smart move.


Seems like a great example as to why to just buy a ship/boat/product as is, the way it’s designed.

Weapons and computers can be installed during the build and upgraded over time if needed... but replacing a nuclear propulsion system with conventional? Surely they could have just selected similar that didn’t need such a massive redesign.
 
Top