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Canadian Federal Election 44 - Sep 2021

daftandbarmy

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If he gets major steps forward in pharmacare, dental, and some movement on affordable housing, those are tangible ‘wins’ for the NDPs platform, notwithstanding that the gulf between them and LPC on this items isn’t very vast. I think the NDP are largely realistic of their status as an opposition party. This is how they achieve wins. Besides, any NDP voter, notwithstanding hatred of the LPC- where else can they go that would be meaningful and viable? The NPD are very secure in their corner of the room.

Also, this gives them three predictable years where they can rebuild their war chest and raise funds. Elections are expensive and I don’t get the sense they have much in the piggy bank.


Two steps forward, one step back....

"So in the middle of an on-going push by premiers for more secure funding to keep basic health care functioning, Trudeau has committed to two dramatic expansions of health care."

Les Leyne: Liberal-NDP plan for dental, pharmacare coverage could sideline premiers' pleas for more health money​


Canada’s premiers have been tearing their hair out about Ottawa’s declining share in the funding of health budgets


National dental care and pharmacare represent the biggest expansion of medicare since it was invented.

But you have to wonder how much money they’re going to suck away from the federal transfers to provinces that keep basic health care operational.

Canada’s premiers have been tearing their hair out about Ottawa’s declining share in the funding of health budgets across the country for years.
The council of the federation, the name they call themselves when they get together, mounted yet another campaign on Tuesday on that theme. Premier John Horgan currently chairs the entity.

As part of the “awareness campaign,” he stressed the need for increased, predictable and sustainable federal funding. It flows from the Canada Health Transfer, which is how the federal government moves health funding to the provinces.

The council of premiers said it is the most effective mechanism for Ottawa to support significant improvements for all Canadians while enabling provinces and territories to address their own needs.


The federal government currently covers about 22 per cent of provincial health care budgets. Premiers want that hiked to 35 per cent, plus guaranteed five per cent hikes every year after. That would be an increase to $69 billion a year from $42 billion last year, for starters.


So they reiterated their invitation to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to begin negotiations without further delay so that an agreement can be finalized as soon as possible.

But they are extending the invitation to someone who just agreed to adopt the NDP’s dental care dream in order to secure his term in power for three more years.

The new federal Liberal-NDP confidence agreement stipulates that the dental care for lower-income families (under $90,000 a year) will start this year and be fully in force by 2025. Independent estimates of the cost are difficult because the scope isn’t defined. But it will be in the billions.

The confidence agreement, which has the effect of a signed contract just like the B.C. version in 2017, also requires “continued progress toward a universal national pharmacare program” by passing a Canada Pharmacare Act by the end of 2023. It would essentially match what B.C. has, and likely be even more expensive than the dental care program.

So in the middle of an on-going push by premiers for more secure funding to keep basic health care functioning, Trudeau has committed to two dramatic expansions of health care.

Canada’s health-care system is a dilapidated old mansion that needs a full-scale renovation. But the confidence agreement means that he’s going to build two expensive new wings on the old pile as it stands.

The confidence agreement doesn’t ignore the perpetual funding crisis of the system as it exists.

It recognizes the system is “stretched” because of COVID, and the parties realize that additional ongoing investments will be needed in the immediate future.

 

Brad Sallows

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Be curious to find out whether the health benefits of solving dental problems outweighs the health benefits of proper access to GPs. Both "save money" by contributing to resolving problems while they are still relatively cheap to resolve.
 

Altair

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Two steps forward, one step back....

"So in the middle of an on-going push by premiers for more secure funding to keep basic health care functioning, Trudeau has committed to two dramatic expansions of health care."

Les Leyne: Liberal-NDP plan for dental, pharmacare coverage could sideline premiers' pleas for more health money​


Canada’s premiers have been tearing their hair out about Ottawa’s declining share in the funding of health budgets


National dental care and pharmacare represent the biggest expansion of medicare since it was invented.

But you have to wonder how much money they’re going to suck away from the federal transfers to provinces that keep basic health care operational.

Canada’s premiers have been tearing their hair out about Ottawa’s declining share in the funding of health budgets across the country for years.
The council of the federation, the name they call themselves when they get together, mounted yet another campaign on Tuesday on that theme. Premier John Horgan currently chairs the entity.

As part of the “awareness campaign,” he stressed the need for increased, predictable and sustainable federal funding. It flows from the Canada Health Transfer, which is how the federal government moves health funding to the provinces.

The council of premiers said it is the most effective mechanism for Ottawa to support significant improvements for all Canadians while enabling provinces and territories to address their own needs.


The federal government currently covers about 22 per cent of provincial health care budgets. Premiers want that hiked to 35 per cent, plus guaranteed five per cent hikes every year after. That would be an increase to $69 billion a year from $42 billion last year, for starters.


So they reiterated their invitation to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to begin negotiations without further delay so that an agreement can be finalized as soon as possible.

But they are extending the invitation to someone who just agreed to adopt the NDP’s dental care dream in order to secure his term in power for three more years.

The new federal Liberal-NDP confidence agreement stipulates that the dental care for lower-income families (under $90,000 a year) will start this year and be fully in force by 2025. Independent estimates of the cost are difficult because the scope isn’t defined. But it will be in the billions.

The confidence agreement, which has the effect of a signed contract just like the B.C. version in 2017, also requires “continued progress toward a universal national pharmacare program” by passing a Canada Pharmacare Act by the end of 2023. It would essentially match what B.C. has, and likely be even more expensive than the dental care program.

So in the middle of an on-going push by premiers for more secure funding to keep basic health care functioning, Trudeau has committed to two dramatic expansions of health care.

Canada’s health-care system is a dilapidated old mansion that needs a full-scale renovation. But the confidence agreement means that he’s going to build two expensive new wings on the old pile as it stands.

The confidence agreement doesn’t ignore the perpetual funding crisis of the system as it exists.

It recognizes the system is “stretched” because of COVID, and the parties realize that additional ongoing investments will be needed in the immediate future.

I kerp hearing that healthcare is a provincial responsibility.
 

Altair

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Be curious to find out whether the health benefits of solving dental problems outweighs the health benefits of proper access to GPs. Both "save money" by contributing to resolving problems while they are still relatively cheap to resolve.
Not sure about dental, but on the pharma front its probably going to be a wash.
 

daftandbarmy

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Well, at least the 'Centre of Gravity' is clear... too bad it's all about getting re-elected and bad for any country on a path to recovery from COVID:

Rex Murphy: Ignore what's happening in the world. The Trudeau government does​


The world can spin whichever way it wants, but under the NDP-reinforced Liberal government, Canada has one purpose only — getting to net zero

Does Canada nullify China’s massive indifference to this whole hysteria? A massive country with a massive population is determined to have its place in modern life. Windmills will not take it there. It will use every energy resource, as long as it thinks it needs to, to get there. It will mine coal. It will build dams. It will seek gas and oil in every strip of land under its sovereignty, and import however much it wants. And so it is entitled to do.

Is there some thought in the PMO that the autocrats of China are checking into Trudeau’s Twitter feed? And calling “Halt” when they read of Canada’s “leadership” in the spurious fight against global warming? Can the delusion be that deep?


 

Altair

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Senator Alex Antic of the Australian Senate raises concern about the World Economic Forum and sitting governments. He even mentions Canada.

I for one hopes the CPC runs on the WEF infiltration into canada.
 

Halifax Tar

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Well, at least the 'Centre of Gravity' is clear... too bad it's all about getting re-elected and bad for any country on a path to recovery from COVID:

Rex Murphy: Ignore what's happening in the world. The Trudeau government does​


The world can spin whichever way it wants, but under the NDP-reinforced Liberal government, Canada has one purpose only — getting to net zero

Does Canada nullify China’s massive indifference to this whole hysteria? A massive country with a massive population is determined to have its place in modern life. Windmills will not take it there. It will use every energy resource, as long as it thinks it needs to, to get there. It will mine coal. It will build dams. It will seek gas and oil in every strip of land under its sovereignty, and import however much it wants. And so it is entitled to do.

Is there some thought in the PMO that the autocrats of China are checking into Trudeau’s Twitter feed? And calling “Halt” when they read of Canada’s “leadership” in the spurious fight against global warming? Can the delusion be that deep?



There is a big debate in Halifax right now as property taxes are set rise a good portion with most of it going to climate change tactics.

To listen to our local politicians talk youd think Halifax was the world's major polluter and if we dont take these actions Halifax will cause the world to cease.
 

Lumber

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There is a big debate in Halifax right now as property taxes are set rise a good portion with most of it going to climate change tactics.

To listen to our local politicians talk youd think Halifax was the world's major polluter and if we dont take these actions Halifax will cause the world to cease.
I'm pro "climate action spending", but after hearing two councillors on the radio talk about what that 3% was going to, I lost my shit. They said that one of the biggest destinations for that money was to buy electric busses. The problem is, electric vehicles are only as clean as the grid they are charged on. Nova Scotia gets 60% of its electricity from the coal fired plant in Cape Breton. We already HAVE busses; I would much rather they spent that money lobbying to shut down the coal fired plant and produce more green energy, THEN buy electric vehicles.
 

Halifax Tar

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I'm pro "climate action spending", but after hearing two councillors on the radio talk about what that 3% was going to, I lost my shit. They said that one of the biggest destinations for that money was to buy electric busses. The problem is, electric vehicles are only as clean as the grid they are charged on. Nova Scotia gets 60% of its electricity from the coal fired plant in Cape Breton. We already HAVE busses; I would much rather they spent that money lobbying to shut down the coal fired plant and produce more green energy, THEN buy electric vehicles.

We listen to the same radio ;)

It's pretty evident that the will of the people they represent will not influence these climate crusaders.
 

Brad Sallows

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Whenever I hear those people talk or see what they write, I have a vision of Christopher Guest saying "These go to 11".
 
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