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Foreign Spouse from Communist Country

johnsmith555

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I'm assuming this hasn't been brought up here prior (my apologies if it has -- recruiting center said they've had zero experience dealing with this type of situation prior). So was supposed to be sworn in today but there was an issue. Back in March I got married overseas (and of course I checked with my recruiting center before going) but whatever the case may be that they didn't realize I was marrying a foreign spouse from a 3rd world communist country. Not saying the country for privacy reasons.

So I'm delayed for another security check (believe Secret) and need to get my marriage certificate translated, notarized and then sent to Foreign Affairs for legalization/authenication.

I've heard alot of different things concerning what happens when you have foreign implications but I'm ready for a long haul ahead.

So once that is all taken care of (which I'm assuming could take 6 months could take a year or more) based on that I have a few questions:

1) if I'm in the military and my spouse is still in her country what would happen if I had leave and wanted to visit her (assuming she hadn't immigrated by that time or gotten Canadian citizenship)? I'm guessing that would need approval by CoC.

2) when I get everything cross checked with foreign affairs (assuming that's a smooth process) would authenticated marriage certificate speed up getting back in/security process? I need to have it regardless.

3) this is a bit of an off topic one but assuming I got all my papers legalized and such, got cleared to re enroll I'd imagineĀ  if she wasn't living in Canada by then would the military aid in anything for her moving to Canada/immigration process? I'd imagine if not it would go a long ways in the eyes of immigration.

4) if we had a child (we don't atm) would this also be a foreign implication? As I'm the familiar with the process but from my understanding after a DNA test and such if a baby is born with a parent that is Canadian citizen they are also a Canadian citizen (they also have dual citizenship). I'm guessing that would be the case. And if I was back in and this occurred while my wife was still overseas would it affect my security clearance again?

Also just to be clear it isn't marriage scam situation she is well off more than me financially, used to be a news photographer took some famous shots of politicians from Canada and such visiting her country, owned a few businesses and did alot of online marketing, has a degree (which I don't) , both the same age etc. I've met all her family and such. I've known a few guys who had spouses from surrounding countries and one from her country. And I'm not a commie and neither is she.

I would find it difficult to choose between my wife and a family with her and a military career. As either way I stand to lose something major to me if it came to that.
 

brihard

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johnsmith555 said:
I'm assuming this hasn't been brought up here prior (my apologies if it has -- recruiting center said they've had zero experience dealing with this type of situation prior). So was supposed to be sworn in today but there was an issue. Back in March I got married overseas (and of course I checked with my recruiting center before going) but whatever the case may be that they didn't realize I was marrying a foreign spouse from a 3rd world communist country. Not saying the country for privacy reasons.

So I'm delayed for another security check (believe Secret) and need to get my marriage certificate translated, notarized and then sent to Foreign Affairs for legalization/authenication.

I've heard alot of different things concerning what happens when you have foreign implications but I'm ready for a long haul ahead.

So once that is all taken care of (which I'm assuming could take 6 months could take a year or more) based on that I have a few questions:

1) if I'm in the military and my spouse is still in her country what would happen if I had leave and wanted to visit her (assuming she hadn't immigrated by that time or gotten Canadian citizenship)? I'm guessing that would need approval by CoC.

2) when I get everything cross checked with foreign affairs (assuming that's a smooth process) would authenticated marriage certificate speed up getting back in/security process? I need to have it regardless.

3) this is a bit of an off topic one but assuming I got all my papers legalized and such, got cleared to re enroll I'd imagineĀ  if she wasn't living in Canada by then would the military aid in anything for her moving to Canada/immigration process? I'd imagine if not it would go a long ways in the eyes of immigration.

4) if we had a child (we don't atm) would this also be a foreign implication? As I'm the familiar with the process but from my understanding after a DNA test and such if a baby is born with a parent that is Canadian citizen they are also a Canadian citizen (they also have dual citizenship). I'm guessing that would be the case. And if I was back in and this occurred while my wife was still overseas would it affect my security clearance again?

Also just to be clear it isn't marriage scam situation she is well off more than me financially, used to be a news photographer took some famous shots of politicians from Canada and such visiting her country, owned a few businesses and did alot of online marketing, has a degree (which I don't) , both the same age etc. I've met all her family and such. I've known a few guys who had spouses from surrounding countries and one from her country. And I'm not a commie and neither is she.

I would find it difficult to choose between my wife and a family with her and a military career. As either way I stand to lose something major to me if it came to that.

1. You require permission to visit foreign countries on leave. This isn't always adhered to and is often overlooked when members are going to the usual vacation spots, but you'll definitely need and will want to get permission to visit lest you compromise (and potentially lose) your clearance, as well as face disciplinary action. It doesn't mean necessarily that you cannot go, just that you'll be expected to get authorization and will probably be given a security briefing before you go.

2. Can't say, but it wouldn't hurt. The sooner you get all the paperwork in order, the better.

3. Nope, not the military's problem. They won't lift a finger to patriate a foreign spouse, that's entirely on you guys. Whether or not it helps for immigration purposes, I can't say, but generally speaking being married to a Canadian certainly helps.

4. In your situation as described, yes any child you have would be a Canadian citizenship by virtue of having a Canadian parent. Bear in mind that dual-citizenship is not necessarily recognized by the other country, particularly if the citizen of that country has settled in Canada. You'll want to seek proper legal advice on this.

All said and done, expect this to take a considerable period of time, however there's no reason to expect that her nationality need be a show stopper.
 

johnsmith555

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Brihard said:
1. You require permission to visit foreign countries on leave. This isn't always adhered to and is often overlooked when members are going to the usual vacation spots, but you'll definitely need and will want to get permission to visit lest you compromise (and potentially lose) your clearance, as well as face disciplinary action. It doesn't mean necessarily that you cannot go, just that you'll be expected to get authorization and will probably be given a security briefing before you go.

2. Can't say, but it wouldn't hurt. The sooner you get all the paperwork in order, the better.

3. Nope, not the military's problem. They won't lift a finger to patriate a foreign spouse, that's entirely on you guys. Whether or not it helps for immigration purposes, I can't say, but generally speaking being married to a Canadian certainly helps.

4. In your situation as described, yes any child you have would be a Canadian citizenship by virtue of having a Canadian parent. Bear in mind that dual-citizenship is not necessarily recognized by the other country, particularly if the citizen of that country has settled in Canada. You'll want to seek proper legal advice on this.

All said and done, expect this to take a considerable period of time, however there's no reason to expect that her nationality need be a show stopper.

Thank you for your answer covered all the bases very thoroughly. Good things are worth waiting for. So I'll look at the bright side and take the waiting period to upgrade myself. It sucks for me personally of course but I fully understand the rationale. Military service is priviledge not a right and obviously when someone has security implications like that they have to be throughout.
 
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