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Intelligence Officer / Operator

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Lumber

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NAVRES IntO = NAVRES Staff Officer...

That's my take on the duties of an IntO after 3 years working for NAVRES.

Actually, now that I think about it, all officers at NRDs = staff officers.

Really, they should all be PAOs given it's one of the primary purposes of NAVRES.
 

Jackal2018

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Lumber said:
NAVRES IntO = NAVRES Staff Officer...

That's my take on the duties of an IntO after 3 years working for NAVRES.

Actually, now that I think about it, all officers at NRDs = staff officers.

Really, they should all be PAOs given it's one of the primary purposes of NAVRES.

In your experience, what would be the day-to-day of an IntO in the NAVRES?
 

Lumber

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There is no "day to day" duties of IntOs in NAVRES.

There are no "Intelligence Officer" positions in the Naval Reserve.

First, let be clear on what I mean when I say, “the Naval Reserve”. I don’t mean everyone who is a naval “reservist”, I mean the specific collection of units and organizations that make up the Naval Reserve. This includes the 24 Naval Reserve Divisions (NRDs), the Headquarters, and to a lesser extent, Naval Fleet School Quebec (which technically a part of a Reg Force organization (NPTG), but for all intents and purposes, it’s a Reserve unit).

Second, let me be clear on what I mean by “Intelligence Officer Position”. There are a few positions within the naval reserve that specifically call for an Intelligence Officer, such as the Intelligence Section’s divisional officer position at NRDs, the IntO training officer(s) at Fleet School, etc. However, there are no positions (yet) within the Naval Reserve where Naval Reserve Intelligence Officers will be asked to perform actual intelligence gathering and analysis, and production of intelligence products.

So, if you are an IntO working within the Naval Reserve (full time or part time), all you will be doing is administration, and lots of it, most having nothing to do with Intelligence. You’ll be a divisional officer responsible for junior officers or junior sailors (IntOps), and you’ll take on whatever projects your department head wants to send your way. You could be overseeing the construction/implementation of a new security network at your building, performing a research project on the acquisition of radars for the unit, developing a training plan for the Intelligence section, assisting the OpsO in designing whole unit/regional training exercises, etc…

Every now and then (6 weekends throughout the year) there will be Naval Reserve “Intelligence Officer Training Weekends” across the country that you can sign up for. I have no idea what happens at these weekends, but I hear there’s lots of beer and shenanigans. I believe the most “advanced” intelligence products that they produce over these “training” weekends is summaries on different nations, military equipment, and world leaders, all using open source intelligence. Whether these products actually get distributed for use, I have no idea (maybe someone can confirm?).

Now, that all being said, there ARE opportunities for a Naval Reserve IntO to work as an actual Intelligence Officer, but all of these jobs are outside of the Naval Reserve. You can go on overseas deployment in Bahrain or Iraq, you can sign up for exercises like RIMPAC, or you can take a long term contract working at TRINITY, which is the Maritime Operational Support & Intelligence Center (MOSIC) in Halifax. You’d be doing actual Intelligence Officer work, but TRINITY is a Regular Force unit, so not “within the Naval Reserve”.

Hope this helps.
 

Jackal2018

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Lumber said:
There is no "day to day" duties of IntOs in NAVRES.

There are no "Intelligence Officer" positions in the Naval Reserve.

First, let be clear on what I mean when I say, “the Naval Reserve”. I don’t mean everyone who is a naval “reservist”, I mean the specific collection of units and organizations that make up the Naval Reserve. This includes the 24 Naval Reserve Divisions (NRDs), the Headquarters, and to a lesser extent, Naval Fleet School Quebec (which technically a part of a Reg Force organization (NPTG), but for all intents and purposes, it’s a Reserve unit).

Second, let me be clear on what I mean by “Intelligence Officer Position”. There are a few positions within the naval reserve that specifically call for an Intelligence Officer, such as the Intelligence Section’s divisional officer position at NRDs, the IntO training officer(s) at Fleet School, etc. However, there are no positions (yet) within the Naval Reserve where Naval Reserve Intelligence Officers will be asked to perform actual intelligence gathering and analysis, and production of intelligence products.

So, if you are an IntO working within the Naval Reserve (full time or part time), all you will be doing is administration, and lots of it, most having nothing to do with Intelligence. You’ll be a divisional officer responsible for junior officers or junior sailors (IntOps), and you’ll take on whatever projects your department head wants to send your way. You could be overseeing the construction/implementation of a new security network at your building, performing a research project on the acquisition of radars for the unit, developing a training plan for the Intelligence section, assisting the OpsO in designing whole unit/regional training exercises, etc…

Every now and then (6 weekends throughout the year) there will be Naval Reserve “Intelligence Officer Training Weekends” across the country that you can sign up for. I have no idea what happens at these weekends, but I hear there’s lots of beer and shenanigans. I believe the most “advanced” intelligence products that they produce over these “training” weekends is summaries on different nations, military equipment, and world leaders, all using open source intelligence. Whether these products actually get distributed for use, I have no idea (maybe someone can confirm?).

Now, that all being said, there ARE opportunities for a Naval Reserve IntO to work as an actual Intelligence Officer, but all of these jobs are outside of the Naval Reserve. You can go on overseas deployment in Bahrain or Iraq, you can sign up for exercises like RIMPAC, or you can take a long term contract working at TRINITY, which is the Maritime Operational Support & Intelligence Center (MOSIC) in Halifax. You’d be doing actual Intelligence Officer work, but TRINITY is a Regular Force unit, so not “within the Naval Reserve”.

Hope this helps.

It helps a lot. Thank you for the insight.
I think I understand the reality of trade as you described it, especially since I heard the trade was taken out and just recently reintroduced again in the NAVRES.
About those deployments or long term contracts, are there real chances of being able to do them after getting trade qualified? Do they require changing to the Regular Force?

Thanks again.
 

Lumber

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Jackal2018 said:
About those deployments or long term contracts, are there real chances of being able to do them after getting trade qualified? Do they require changing to the Regular Force?

Thanks again.

Nope. One thing you'll become quite familiar with is CFTPOs (basically short term taskings) and "REOs" (reserve employment opportunities - these are essentially job bulletins for reservists (not just naval reservists)).

In either of these cases, they will be advertising trying to specifically attract reservists (there will be other job postings/tasking opportunities aimed specifically at Reg Force IntOs). All you do is taken on a short term contract (1-6 month) or long term contract (2-3 years) for these exercises/units, but your status as a "reservists" does not change the entire time, which means at ANY point, you can simply say "screw this, I'm done, I'm going back to my old job".**

**Caveat: unless there's a war; then you're not going ANYWHERE! :D
 

Blackadder1916

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Jackal2018 said:
About those deployments or long term contracts, are there real chances of being able to do them after getting trade qualified? Do they require changing to the Regular Force?
Lumber said:
Nope. One thing you'll become quite familiar with is CFTPOs (basically short term taskings) and "REOs" (reserve employment opportunities - these are essentially job bulletins for reservists (not just naval reservists)).


Further to Lumber's explanation, Reserve Employment Opportunities are online if you want to see what is available.  http://armyapp.forces.gc.ca/reo-oer/en/index.aspx
 

Jackal2018

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Thanks to Lumber and Blackadder1916 for all the information. It's been very helpful. I'm very excited to get started in the CF.

Now all I need to do is wait and hope that everything goes well in my application.

Wish me luck.
 

polska

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Hi everyone,

Apologies for resurrecting a long dead thread, but I can't seem to find an answer.  Are Air Force and Navy Intelligence Officers still required to do CAP (BMOQ-L)?
 

Bushman242

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polska said:
Hi everyone,

Apologies for resurrecting a long dead thread, but I can't seem to find an answer.  Are Air Force and Navy Intelligence Officers still required to do CAP (BMOQ-L)?

I am wondering the exact same thing so thanks for asking! It doesn't specify on the site that only Land candidates need to complete the Common Army phase... it seems as though an Int Officer inherently needs the Land training, regardless of posted environment.
 

Jstock92

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Hey guys, Im looking for some information from past or present Intelligence operators.

I just put in my VOT last month. I would like to hear something from people with real experience, as after 6 years in my current trade I understand that the videos on the Forces website can be a bit misleading.

Cheers
 

doydeldog

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Hi, there! It's my first post so I'm sorry if it's not in the right place. I'm sure it's been asked a hundred times but most of what I searched is relatively dated information - so I was hoping for some fresh insight.

I've been considering a few trades, but the NCM Intelligence Operator has stood out to me so far. I've yet to ask the recruitment office about it yet but I was just looking to get a take from people who have a general idea about it. I'm mainly interested in knowing how competitive of a trade it is; how hard it is to get into and an estimation of how high I might need to score in the CFAT to be eligible. Any other information about the job, apart from what the video says on the career site, would also be greatly appreciated!
 

alwaysfresh

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Has anyone had any experience with IntOp reserves side? I’m just wondering about education standards. I failed out of my university a few years ago due to poor study habits and being young and stupid. I see that, I’ve worked to beat it, and I’m set to graduate next year from a CC. I know IntOp only requires grade 10, but will my university marks reduce my chances of getting in?
 

jaysfan17

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I was wondering if i could get some insight on how lengthy the process is of VOT’ing from Inf O to Int O. Specially, what does the whole “trades being red or green mean”. Does red mean they need more people?
 

PuckChaser

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If the trade you are leaving is red, they cap how many people can transfer out every year. If the trade you want to move to is red, they're have a low PML and accept more VOTs than a green trade. Green to red = "easier", Red to Green = difficult
 

jaysfan17

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If the trade you are leaving is red, they cap how many people can transfer out every year. If the trade you want to move to is red, they're have a low PML and accept more VOTs than a green trade. Green to red = "easier", Red to Green = difficult
Roger, thank you.

I suspect Inf O to Int O will be the ‘red to green’ scenario.
 

dapaterson

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Int is Red because of growing demand.

Inf trades are relatively easy to fill - training is inexpensive, and there's generally a solid number of Res to Reg CTs. So leaving Inf should not be a big issue.
 
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