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Medical Assistant - Reserve

mariomike

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mariomike said:
You may wish to ask how likely it will be, and how long you will have to wait, for PRes Infantry TCCC.

PMedMoe said:
The chances of a reservist who is not deploying getting a TCCC course is slim to none and slim just walked out the door. 

JMei001 said:
Is there a link that points out the curriculum of Med A, showing what procedures they're taught?

Medical Assistant Questions and Answers are here,

Medical Assistant - Reserve 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/4238.0.html
10 pages.

 

MedCorps

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ModlrMike said:
In addition to the other answers, TCCC had for the most part been "just in time" training. Unless you were going to be deployed, you probably wouldn't get it as a reservist infanteer.

Also the target for those deploying with the training is 1 in 10.  As such, you roll the dice their also that you will not be the guy picked up for the specialty course.

The Med A's prehospital skill set is that of an Emergency Medical Responder with some additional military protocols that include such things like IV's, catheter insertion, supraglottic airway, epinephrine, needle decompression, haemostatic gauze, tourniquet, intraosseous insertion, pelvic binders, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, tetracaine, moxifloxacin, glucose gel and CBRN protocols.

They also gain skills in primary health care (clinic medicine) and in-patient care as well as medical service specific field skills and how to run / work in a medical clinic. 

MC


 

JMei001

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MedCorps said:
Also the target for those deploying with the training is 1 in 10.  As such, you roll the dice their also that you will not be the guy picked up for the specialty course.

The Med A's prehospital skill set is that of an Emergency Medical Responder with some additional military protocols that include such things like IV's, catheter insertion, supraglottic airway, epinephrine, needle decompression, haemostatic gauze, tourniquet, intraosseous insertion, pelvic binders, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, tetracaine, moxifloxacin, glucose gel and CBRN protocols.

They also gain skills in primary health care (clinic medicine) and in-patient care as well as medical service specific field skills and how to run / work in a medical clinic. 

MC
This is amazing, this is exactly the information I've been looking for for some time now that I feel the forums was lacking. Hopefully this helps future Med A's get answers.

Thank you so much.
Best regards,
J


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JMei001

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Hey guys, (I've used the search function already, past posts related to some of my questions are deleted or inaccessible)

I'm almost done the recruiting process as a Med A but a close friend who's ex military tells me that as a Med A in a Fd Amb unit, you unfortunately get a whole lot of nothing done in terms of clinical experience. He says I'm better off joining the infantry to focus my experience on leadership and communication, and applying to learn TCCC, rather than joining a Med A and not applying my skills ever. He says the only way I'll be useful is if I get attached to a combat arms unit.

I do believe that being a Med A in a fd amb will put me in a a good environment socially for networking (being surrounded by healthcare practitioners), health knowledge, and will still get the leadership?

I'm also applying to med school so as much as the military is something I really want to do wholeheartedly, I also would like to align it properly with future endeavours down the line.


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mariomike

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JMei001 said:
He says I'm better off joining the infantry to focus my experience on leadership and communication, and applying to learn TCCC, rather than joining a Med A and not applying my skills ever.


See,
Reply #232
OP: JMei001
http://milnet.ca/forums/threads/4238/post-1494199.html#msg1494199
JMei001 said:
I've also been told being in the infantry and doing TCCC is equivalent to being a Med A. My main interest is a medical based trade although I am also quite interested in infantry related business since it appeals to me as a more fulfilling 'army' experience. I'm trying to decide if it's worth it to stick with Med A and be surrounded in a medical network/clinical environment, which aligns well with my application to med school, or go with infantryman w/ TCCC.
 

JMei001

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mariomike said:
See,
Reply #232
OP: JMei001
http://milnet.ca/forums/threads/4238/post-1494199.html#msg1494199
Haha crap! You're right I forgot I posted about that. I guess I'm having difficulty finding a real answer about what it's going to be like once I start and if I'll actually use the stuff I learn on people


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kratz

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JMei001 said:
Haha crap! You're right I forgot I posted about that. I guess I'm having difficulty finding a real answer about what it's going to be like once I start and if I'll actually use the stuff I learn on people

Our volunteers belong to multiple sites. If, and when they want to reply to question(s), they will.
 

Loachman

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JMei001 said:
past posts related to some of my questions are deleted or inaccessible

Likely because threads have been merged.
 

JMei001

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Hey,

What courses are taken during QL4 of medical assistant?

Also, I'm not sure how it works in the military about getting loaded onto courses, but are there opportunities/courses to learn different forms of healthcare, in different environments and new techniques?


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mariomike

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JMei001 said:
Also, I'm not sure how it works in the military about getting loaded onto courses, but are there opportunities/courses to learn different forms of healthcare, in different environments and new techniques?

Medical Assistant
https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/services/caf-jobs/career-options/fields-work/health-care/medical-assistant.html
See "Specialty training".
 

MedCorps

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JMei001 said:
Hey,

What courses are taken during QL4 of medical assistant?

RQL4 Medical Assistant is a course unto itself. You will continue to learn the craft of being a Medical Assistant building on what you learned on RQL3 the summer or course before. More advanced pre-hospital care / combat medical skills, field skills and nursing skills are included in the RQL4 curriculum.

MC
 

JMei001

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MedCorps said:
RQL4 Medical Assistant is a course unto itself. You will continue to learn the craft of being a Medical Assistant building on what you learned on RQL3 the summer or course before. More advanced pre-hospital care / combat medical skills, field skills and nursing skills are included in the RQL4 curriculum.

MC
Very cool. Thanks. I found the site talks about 'specialty training", however those are QL5 options I believe since PCP training is included in the list, that's why I was wondering about QL4, don't see any info on that anywhwre


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MedCorps

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Medical Assistants do not do the PCP training, that is for Medical Technicians (who do it on their QL3) and the primary training differentiation between the two trades.

Not much medical specialty (specialty sub-specification) training for a Medical Assistant. 

Basic - International Trauma Life Support is one that jumps out as fairly common. Some non-medical SS training such as Basic Winter Warfare, Army Driver Wheeled, Army Dismounted Tactical Communication Course, Army mounted Tactical Communication Course, Unit Storesman Course are ones that come to mind that I have been seeing occasionally run by the Res F field ambulances.

MC
 

JMei001

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Awesome. Are there courses like winter medicine type stuff, the equivalent of winter warfare for medical trades?

Also on the DND website linked above by MarioMike, it says;
Medical Assistant training consists of six areas of practice, namely: Prehospital Care; Operational Casualty Care; Medical Service Specific Field Skills; Primary Care; Administration and Clinic Support; and In-Patient Care.

Med As may be offered the opportunity to develop specialized skills through formal courses and on-the-job training, including:

Primary Care Paramedic Course (qualified individuals will have an opportunity to be selected to take this training)
Medical Supply Training (order and maintain medical supplies within the CAF)
In-Patient Care Training (provide short-term care for patients in a holding facility)

-- What about the In-Patient care training, Medical Supply Training?
 

mariomike

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JMei001 said:
Also on the DND website linked above by MarioMike, it says;
Medical Assistant training consists of six areas of practice, namely: Prehospital Care; Operational Casualty Care; Medical Service Specific Field Skills; Primary Care; Administration and Clinic Support; and In-Patient Care.

Med As may be offered the opportunity to develop specialized skills through formal courses and on-the-job training, including:

Primary Care Paramedic Course (qualified individuals will have an opportunity to be selected to take this training)
Medical Supply Training (order and maintain medical supplies within the CAF)
In-Patient Care Training (provide short-term care for patients in a holding facility)

Paramedicine is provincially regulated. Requirements and issue of a licence to practice are set by the individual regulators.

In Ontario,
http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/public/program/ehs/qa/edu_qa.html

 

MedCorps

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The area of Prehospital Care; Operational Casualty Care; Medical Service Specific Field Skills; Primary Care; Administration and Clinic Support; and In-Patient Care are covered on the RQL3, RQL4 and RQL6A courses as sections within the course training plan.

Prehospital Cold Weather Medicine is a formal course, but seldom run, unfortunately as it is a really good course. More often than not, cold weather medicine will be covered in ad hoc lectures and training and not in a formal course.

Medical supply course is on the books, but never run.  Once again, unfortunately. Training in medical supply will be on-the-job. 

PCP training is a course, contracted to a civilian college (in New Brunswick) to teach and will convert a Medical Assistant RQL4 to a Medical Technician QL3 if one takes it. 

In-patient care training is also ad hoc after one gets it on the modules on the RQL4 and RQL6A. More in vogue now under the topic Prolonged Field Care (PFC).  No formal Specialty Specification course. There was hopes that the 1 Canadian Field Hospital - Bedside Care Program would go national and become a formal course, but that never happened. 

Other medical specialties found, like Forward Aeromedical Evacuation, Medical Evacuation Crew member, etc are generally only found in the Regular Force, but sometimes you will get a Res F Med A / Med Tech on them. 

MC
 

JMei001

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MedCorps said:
The area of Prehospital Care; Operational Casualty Care; Medical Service Specific Field Skills; Primary Care; Administration and Clinic Support; and In-Patient Care are covered on the RQL3, RQL4 and RQL6A courses as sections within the course training plan.

Prehospital Cold Weather Medicine is a formal course, but seldom run, unfortunately as it is a really good course. More often than not, cold weather medicine will be covered in ad hoc lectures and training and not in a formal course.

Medical supply course is on the books, but never run.  Once again, unfortunately. Training in medical supply will be on-the-job. 

PCP training is a course, contracted to a civilian college (in New Brunswick) to teach and will convert a Medical Assistant RQL4 to a Medical Technician QL3 if one takes it. 

In-patient care training is also ad hoc after one gets it on the modules on the RQL4 and RQL6A. More in vogue now under the topic Prolonged Field Care (PFC).  No formal Specialty Specification course. There was hopes that the 1 Canadian Field Hospital - Bedside Care Program would go national and become a formal course, but that never happened. 

Other medical specialties found, like Forward Aeromedical Evacuation, Medical Evacuation Crew member, etc are generally only found in the Regular Force, but sometimes you will get a Res F Med A / Med Tech on them. 

MC
You sir are amazing, once again thank you for your info!!


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Jiminito

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My apologies if this has already been answered.
What exactly is the difference between Medical Assistant and Medical Technician?
Is training the same? Is job the same?
This is what I understand so far, please correct me if I'm wrong:
-Med-Tech is a trade for Regular Forces
-You can be a Med-Tech in the Reserves only if you are licensed as a Civilian Paramedic
-Med-A is a trade for the Reserve Forces
-You do not need to be a paramedic or be licensed if you are a Med-A
-Both trades go through the same training in the CF, QL3, QL4, QL6A, QL6B?
I've also read somewhere that they're trying to merge the two trades into just Med-A, is this true?
 

mariomike

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Jiminito said:
What exactly is the difference between Medical Assistant and Medical Technician?

This may help,

Medical Technician ( Med Tech )
https://army.ca/forums/threads/28820.475.html
20 pages.

Jiminito said:
-Med-A is a trade for the Reserve Forces

Yes.
 
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