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New MND - Anita Anand

daftandbarmy

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So I’m going to go out on a limb and say higher tech jobs pay better in the private sector. And honestly not a lot of women want to join either.

I've had a few (excellent) females in my rifle companies over the years.

I was somewhat dubious to begin with until that one time where a female Cpl brought her daughter in to parade night in the kid's car seat (no sitter available) and took her around all the stations in our Airborne Platoon PT test and knocked it out of the park e.g., doing situps with the baby seat at her feet going 'Boo!' to her daughter each time she crunched up.

I asked them why there weren't more women in the Infantry.

Their answer: no one invites women to join. All the advertising is fully 'Male WASP' targeted.

The women who figure it out say to themselves 'Hell, I can do that too, maybe even better', and most of them do just that.
 

Brad Sallows

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the more technical / greater education required trades

Yes, people have choices. I can guess that this is usually what's at the root of things that so many people are determined to chalk up to various other causes.
 

Kilted

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I've had a few (excellent) females in my rifle companies over the years.

I was somewhat dubious to begin with until that one time where a female Cpl brought her daughter in to parade night in the kid's car seat (no sitter available) and took her around all the stations in our Airborne Platoon PT test and knocked it out of the park e.g., doing situps with the baby seat at her feet going 'Boo!' to her daughter each time she crunched up.
There was a guy at my unit who use to bring his kids for whatever reason. He was told that he wasn't allowed to.
 

Halifax Tar

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I think family culture has a lot to do with it,......lots of folks think 'military' is what you do when you have no other options and are kinda failing at "life". Two of my three Sisters were in, but the military was celebrated in our upbringing, definitionally not so much in lots of families.

This 100%.

My parents were very disappointed in my joining th CAF. My actually asked why I was throwing my life away to become a drunken wife beater.

The irony was not lost on me as it was coming from a rank and file prison guard at the time. No offense intended.
 

Journeyman

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One of my female coworkers told me she was considering joining the CAF but her family pressured her not to. In their country of origin the military is not thought of fondly.
Born in Canada?
My parents were very disappointed in my joining th CAF.
I quit high school. My dad said 'get in the car' and took me to the Seafarers Union Hall. They were closed. He dropped me off at the CAF Recruiters, said "make your own way home," and drove off.

Best decision I never made.
 

lenaitch

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Realistically that is going to be a common issue with many cultures until they have been here for a couple generations.[/url]
Similar with law enforcement, where cops in the parents' country of origin aren't held in high regard.

The son of one of my former colleagues joined the Reserves while in college (I don't know which Res., it confuses me). At an 'old farts breakfast' one day he told the story of the son coming home for the weekend, in uniform, and his mother said 'go change first - I can't hug you wearing that'. The table went rather silent until the conversation moved on.

Harsh.
 

mariomike

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Realistically that is going to be a common issue with many cultures until they have been here for a couple generations.[/url]
That is a shame. Because I believe young people will have a greater sense of the value of Canadian citizenship if they are trained to defend it.
 

daftandbarmy

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That is a shame. Because I believe young people will have a greater sense of the value of Canadian citizenship if they are trained to defend it.

I disagree.

Anyone can be trained to be a soldier.

They don't have to care about anything except pleasing their section commander and not looking like a c*nt in front of their peers.

In fact, the 'overly patriotic' ones should be regarded with a deep suspicion bordering on paranoia. Luckily, if we need someone to move first because 'sniper' there will be someone who comes to mind pretty quickly ;)
 

mariomike

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I disagree.

Anyone can be trained to be a soldier.

They don't have to care about anything except pleasing their section commander and not looking like a c*nt in front of their peers.

In fact, the 'overly patriotic' ones should be regarded with a deep suspicion bordering on paranoia. Luckily, if we need someone to move first because 'sniper' there will be someone who comes to mind pretty quickly ;)
Guess I should have included, during peacetime - when more time is available - training could include more attention to citizenship and civic education than could be possible during hurried wartime training.

Maybe that education would give them a better appreciation of the significance of democracy in general, and Canadian democracy in particular.

Maybe be of value in teaching young people a sense of civic responsiblity.

Tell them exactly what it is they are defending.

Or, maybe not. 🤷‍♂️
 

HiTechComms

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mariomike

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In fact, the 'overly patriotic' ones should be regarded with a deep suspicion bordering on paranoia.

I'm not sugesting transforming women and minorities into CAF sniper fanatics.

I was thinking maybe a little less of this:

One of my female coworkers told me she was considering joining the CAF but her family pressured her not to. In their country of origin the military is not thought of fondly.
 

daftandbarmy

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I'm not sugesting transforming women and minorities into CAF sniper fanatics.

But that's one of my favourite things.

And it's a great motivator for teenagers of all shapes, sizes, colours and socio-economic levels, let me tell you! :)
 

Quirky

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......lots of folks think 'military' is what you do when you have no other options and are kinda failing at "life".

I get this a lot until I tell them I can 'retire' in my mid-40's with a pension that's greater than their current salary.
 
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