• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Operation Nanook 2010

tomahawk6

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
61
Points
530
Ran across some photos of Operation Nanook 2010. The SGT on Polar Bear watch should have one of those .303's. :)

Operation NANOOK is one of three major recurring sovereignty operations conducted annually by the Canadian Forces (CF) in Canada's Arctic.

Planned and directed by Joint Task Force North (JTFN) the whole-of-government operation highlights interoperability, command and control, and cooperation with interdepartmental and intergovernmental partners in the North.

Operation NANOOK 10 takes place in Canada's Eastern and High Arctic area from August 6 to 26 and includes two major exercises, Exercise NATSIQ, a sovereignty and presence patrolling exercise of military resources, and Exercise TALLURUTIIT a whole-of -government exercise that focuses on environmental containment and remediation resulting from a simulated fuel spill..Operation NANOOK 10, as a combined, joint and integrated operation engages personnel and resources (ships and aircraft) from: the Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army, Canada's Air Force and CF Special Forces; other federal government departments to include Public Safety, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canadian Coast Guard (central and Arctic region), Transport Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, Parks Canada, the Government of Nunavut; the municipal communities of Resolute Bay, Pond Inlet, Grise Fjord, Iqaluit and Arctic Bay; and internationally the US Navy's 2nd Fleet, the US Coast Guard and the Royal Danish Navy.

7d457254.jpg

Aug 15, 2010 Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada Soldiers of the Arctic Response Company Group prepare to fire the .303 Lee Enfield rifle during range day in Resolute Bay, Nunavut, for Operation Nanook 10 on 15 Aug 2010.

1f9b4de7.jpg

Aug 15, 2010 Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada Star Marualik, a Ranger with 1 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group, coaches a soldier from the Arctic Response Company Group's 2 Platoon during range day in Resolute Bay, Nunavut, for Operation Nanook 10 on 15 Aug 2010.

d65274be.jpg

14 August 2010 Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada 2 Platoon of the Arctic Response Company Group patrols during survival training held in Resolute Bay, Nunavut, for Operation Nanook 10 on 14 Aug 2010.

99c0135f.jpg


db0452f5.jpg

14 August 2010,Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada,Corporal Warner from 3 Platoon arrives to the overnight survival training site via CH-146 Griffon Helicopter during Operation NANOOK 10.

e57d9b43.jpg

14 August 2010,Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada,Master Corporal Christopher Banks, 3 Platoon, stands on polar bear watch on a hill overlooking the camp during overnight survival training.

bea39812.jpg

13 August 2010,Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada,Sergeant Robert Roper, Second In Command of 3 Platoon, stands on polar bear watch while troops practice survival training skills for Operation NANOOK.

a1d6c49e.jpg

13 August 2010,Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada,The Canadian Rangers teach members of 3 Platoon how to make fox traps out of rocks. By forming the rocks in a circle with a wide base growing narrower at the top the fox is able to crawl in to get the bait but once inside is trapped.
 

HavokFour

Full Member
Reaction score
0
Points
210
Possibly dumb question(s), but why are they using Lee Enfield's? Secondly, I think we need a better colour scheme for CADPAT for the northern regions if we don't already. (walking bushes comes to mind)
 

Ex-Dragoon

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
1
Points
0
HavokFour said:
Possibly dumb question(s), but why are they using Lee Enfield's? Secondly, I think we need a better colour scheme for CADPAT for the northern regions if we don't already. (walking bushes comes to mind)

Now do we really need to tell you to search as to why they are using SMLEs? As for CADPAT choices, was anything said that this was a tactical exercise?
 

Nemecek

Jr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
0
HavokFour,


The Lee-Enfields have a proven reliability in freezing conditions like one would experience in the arctic autumn/winter/spring. I completely agree with the CADPAT comment as well. It seems logical to recreate as many of the conditions as possible for an operation when conducting exercises.
I'm thinking that perhaps the monochrome white would have stood out more on the grey-ish rocks than the green disruptive pattern.


...Or maybe it was just an extraneous expense. Who knows, I'm sure they thought about it when putting the exercise together at least.
 

HavokFour

Full Member
Reaction score
0
Points
210
After many hours of researching on Google, Wikipedia, and the use of the Search function I now understand why the Lee Enfield is used.

On the topic of CADPAT, we don't really have anything that matches the terrain up there. We have CADPAT TW for the leafy areas and CADPAT AR, CADPAT W/A for the snowy regions and an upcoming (if it isn't already out) CUEPAT for urban operations. Since Canada is cracking down on Arctic sovereignty I would think they'd have something for those "in between" places.

But hey, I suppose CUEPAT will have plenty of grey for it.
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
2,989
Points
1,060
HavokFour said:
After many hours of researching on Google, Wikipedia, and the use of the Search function I now understand why the Lee Enfield is used.

On the topic of CADPAT, we don't really have anything that matches the terrain up there. We have CADPAT TW for the leafy areas and CADPAT AR, CADPAT W/A for the snowy regions and an upcoming (if it isn't already out) CUEPAT for urban operations. Since Canada is cracking down on Arctic sovereignty I would think they'd have something for those "in between" places.

But hey, I suppose CUEPAT will have plenty of grey for it.

Well, it's usually howling winds with rain and sleet up there in the summer anyways, so it's hard to spot even a bright orange survival suit at a moderate distance most of the time.
 

ArmyRick

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
68
Points
530
Havokfour, your comments, seriously? Mind you I have read your expirience and I see your a civilian.

Don't take this the wrong way but if camoflogue is really an issue than its a ghillie suit, custom made for the region. Otherwise our CADPAT TW is sufficient. We can't make a new type of CADPAT for the prairie, rocky desert, flat desert, pine forest, mountains, african savanah, etc, etc. If we did, the cost would be ridicolous!
 

SeanNewman

Banned
Banned
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Lee Enfields are what the CF Rangers use (for reasons already listed, among just being generally reliable and they were a free gift since they were just in storage).  I would rather have a LE than a C7 for shooting a Polar Bear running toward me, too.

As for the arctic camo issue, I have seen some CF-generated posters and other brochures that had what I would assume was a prototype design for acrtic cadpat; it was mostly white with I believe some grey and a light brown blends if memory serves.

Any "Clothe The Soldier" reps on here who can verify whether or not that's still in the works?

And George Wallace is correct, but I believe he is referring to the "winter whites" that are not clothes themselves but more like over-clothes that are very baggy and go over your legs, your torso, and rucksack (3 pieces).  Then you have the gloves, helmet cover, and mucklucks (sp?) that are actually white.
 

tomahawk6

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
61
Points
530
For the longest time the CF wore olive drab. You cant have camo for every environment and as George pointed out overwhites do nicely  for 9 months of the year.
 

vorden

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
0
The Lee Enfield is a beautiful weapon, I my brother's modified yesterday. That being said I'd rather have a .50 to put down a polar bear that wanted me for supper.
 

Tank Troll

Full Member
Reaction score
0
Points
0
vorden said:
The Lee Enfield is a beautiful weapon, I my brother's modified yesterday. That being said I'd rather have a .50 to put down a polar bear that wanted me for supper.

You can lug a .50 around all you want but a .303 works very well (seen one used on a polar bear) Our old FNs work well in that reguard all so. Plus not a lot of .50 to be had, and they just don't give them out to anyone.
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
2,989
Points
1,060
Since we're into kit 'train spotting' mode, I'm more interested in the boots they're wearing. What the heck are they? They don't resemble any issued boots I've seen before (but that doesn't count for much).
 

logmore

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
0
OP Nanook is a sovereignty operation, we want any one and every one to see the troops and to know that they are there, this is not a warfighting type situation. For the  uninformed, the Arctic is a very hotly contested area right now, it is believed that 40%+/- of the remaining natural resources are located there. Every one is trying to get a piece of the action including contries that don't border on the area(China). The Op is to put boots on the ground and show those who may be thinking undesirable thoughts that this is our land and it going to stay our land. There are those who still think it is the 1600's and by planting a flag they can lay claim(a Russian sub planted a flag on the seabed at the north pole, they also have icebreaker cruise ships that regularly take tourists to the pole and sometimes make stops at the remote northern communities on Canadian Soil where there are no customs or RCMP)So it is a deterrent, a show of force so visibility is a key component.

As for the .303 it is the weapon issued to the Canadian Rangers. The rangers are made up from the population of the remote northern communities, with the majority of them the people indigenous to the  region. Some have identified correctly that simplicity=reliability, they are some what correct and yes there are quite a few of them left from WWI and WWII, but they are also not a restricted or prohibited weapon in Canada and therefore require far less rules for the securement and storage. As most of the rangers are issued with their weapons upon enrollment or have ready access to them it only makes sense.

The Sgt on Bear watch is exactly that just a "Watch", if there is a problem or potential problem, the Rangers will deal with it.
 

dogger1936

Sr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Having pointed out the Sgt on polarbear watch...does anyone else get disturbed when people sling their weapons in positions they would never be able to use it? Or am I getting old and crusty/ anal?

For some reason that really bugs me. No matter the vaildity of what a .223 will do to a bear.
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
2,989
Points
1,060
George Wallace said:
SWATs, Daners, Oakleys, etc.

Of course, I forgot (smacks ample forehead), our new and unimproved issue boots don't work well in the 'temperate' arctic either...
 

ArmyRick

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
68
Points
530
That Sgt (I know him) is old and crusty too (something close to 30 years). BTW, its POLAR BEAR watch, its not like a bear is going to open up on him with a burst from an MG! He slings it that for that duty, so be it.
 

medicineman

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
161
Points
680
You don't see if his hand is on the pistol grip do you?  Maybe he's left handed and it's in a relaxed ready position for him - kinda sorta looks that way to me...

MM
 
Top