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OSI & VAC

TN2IC

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Too bad the OSI Client DENIED ME TREATMENT. Here some pills and leave us alone, speech. Things have been dark for a long time. And I think I hit a new low last weekend.

Thanks OSI for your amazing help. And VAC can blow me.
 

the 48th regulator

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Anna-da-Banana said:
Too bad the OSI Client DENIED ME TREATMENT. Here some pills and leave us alone, speech. Things have been dark for a long time. And I think I hit a new low last weekend.

Thanks OSI for your amazing help. And VAC can blow me.

Brother,

Talk to us, what happened.  Your message is a bit messed up.

If you can't in the open, PM me, and we can talk.

dileas

tess
 

TN2IC

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Last summer I seen the OSI clinic after my deployment. I didn't want to do anything with work. I blew all my annual leave then. I didn't even want to put a uniform on. I went to the clinic and after 3 appointments, they said for me to go to the psycho-social service.

Now I have a doctor that keep me on my happy pills. After the suicide attempt, I went to my GP, which he up my dosage. And now I have an appointment with a social worker to help me with stress. And continuing appointments with the quack doctor. I even ask my GP about leave, he just chuckle at me. I feel very dumb now.


I just find it a a major kick in the nuts when a eastern European lady at the OSI clinic telling me I'm not qualified for OSI clinlic. Yet, I show a lot of symptoms of PTSD. May be cause I'm on a retard base. A lot of people about here don't understand me. They think it is a game.
 

the 48th regulator

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Anna-da-Banana said:
Last summer I seen the OSI clinic after my deployment. I didn't want to do anything with work. I blew all my annual leave then. I didn't even want to put a uniform on. I went to the clinic and after 3 appointments, they said for me to go to the psycho-social service.

Now I have a doctor that keep me on my happy pills. After the suicide attempt, I went to my GP, which he up my dosage. And now I have an appointment with a social worker to help me with stress. And continuing appointments with the quack doctor. I even ask my GP about leave, he just chuckle at me. I feel very dumb now.


I just find it a a major kick in the nuts when a eastern European lady at the OSI clinic telling me I'm not qualified for OSI clinlic. Yet, I show a lot of symptoms of PTSD. May be cause I'm on a retard base. A lot of people about here don't understand me. They think it is a game.

Have been connected with your local OSISS rep?

dileas

tess


 

Wookilar

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Agree with Tess.

The OSISS guys are just that, normal guys. With some good training to boot and the experiences to back it up, not some 2nd year social worker that has no idea what the hell you are talking about. The ones I have spoken to here in Gagetown are excellent (Fred and ?? crap forget right now).

It really sucks going through the meds and it seems like jumping through useless hoop after useless hoop. More than a few of us on here have fought (ourselves and the system) for years. You've already done what I think is the hardest part, seeking help in the first place.


Maybe this all sounds hollow right now. What I went through was not the same that you are going through, but let's just say we all seem to share some similarities.

There is an OSISS office just about everywhere now, they are nowhere near the chain of command, and speak plain language. They themselves have fought with the CF and VAC (and Dr's and meds and everything else). If you do not feel comfortable going there, ask to meet someone over a coffee. I know the ones here do that.

I've never gone to one of the peer support group meetings, but I have made a few visits to their "office" if you can call it that. We sit in the living room and chat about just about everything. I was getting screwed around my Mental Health here and they were dancing around a diagnosis until Fred told me the magic words and phrases that would get them to listen. Now, I've been relatively stable for going on 2 years, things are only improving.

I know the whole looks deep, but you can get out of it.

Wook
 

Jimmy_D

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Wookilar said:
Agree with Tess.

The OSISS guys are just that, normal guys. With some good training to boot and the experiences to back it up, not some 2nd year social worker that has no idea what the hell you are talking about. The ones I have spoken to here in Gagetown are excellent (Fred and Jerry crap forget right now).

It really sucks going through the meds and it seems like jumping through useless hoop after useless hoop. More than a few of us on here have fought (ourselves and the system) for years. You've already done what I think is the hardest part, seeking help in the first place.


Maybe this all sounds hollow right now. What I went through was not the same that you are going through, but let's just say we all seem to share some similarities.

There is an OSISS office just about everywhere now, they are nowhere near the chain of command, and speak plain language. They themselves have fought with the CF and VAC (and Dr's and meds and everything else). If you do not feel comfortable going there, ask to meet someone over a coffee. I know the ones here do that.

I've never gone to one of the peer support group meetings, but I have made a few visits to their "office" if you can call it that. We sit in the living room and chat about just about everything. I was getting screwed around my Mental Health here and they were dancing around a diagnosis until Fred told me the magic words and phrases that would get them to listen. Now, I've been relatively stable for going on 2 years, things are only improving.

I know the whole looks deep, but you can get out of it.

Wook
 

Wookilar

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:facepalm: thanks Jimmy.

And a note: The OSISS guys are not the same as the OSI Clinic (at least not here). The clinic is in Freddie, but the OSISS office is right in the Q's in Oromocto.

Wook
 

Gunner98

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I am confused - are you Regular Force, Reserve Force or a VAC client.  There is a difference between the OSI clinic in Fredericton is normally for VAC clients and the OTSSC (Operational Trauma Support Services Centre) recently opened as part of the CF Health Services Centre is normally for serving soldiers (it is currently located in a PMQ on Base).  Either of these can be used for clients/soldiers in the case of longer wait times or special treatment modalities.
 

Jimmy_D

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The OSI clinic in Fredericton has been looking at anyone who has been deemed with an OSI from CFB Gagetown, in which there was a referral from one of the MO's. REG, RES, VAC does not matter. If they have the space, you have the referral, and you agree to go there. Then there you will go.
 

Gunner98

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JD,

Thanks for the clarification, I have an interest in this area and your reply helps. :salute:
 

kstart

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TN,

The social worker might be able to help you with the stress symptoms-- their job is not to push pills.  IME with a social worker, she listened and when I had experiences of getting more triggered from talking about stuff, venting-- she used those opportunities as "teachable moments', guided me into how to 'slow it down', re-ground brought me a lot of power over my symptoms, just from a few small moments of that.  There's also a normal process about anxiousness, trust, agitation and the challenge of learning, re-learning patience (which I found to be really hard-- friken 'control freak' I was, still have some of those tendencies, but not so intense, manageable).  IME, it's more challenging at the beginningn of things, earlier stages in recovery. Meds and getting the right ones, dosages can/do help and then can in turn, make it a little bit easier to deal with and learn new coping stuff/first aid management of OSI/ptsd symptoms etc.

Current treatment can tie you over as more is built into the treatment plan (sometimes there are small waitlists for other services)-- check out the resources others are suggesting here.  You do have back-up and it looks to me that you've got some good people here who've got your back.

I'm not a CF member, I only recognize some things of the 'ride' you're in for and you will get through it.  Believe it, if you don't, well sometimes it's a leap of faith (and no matter how reluctant you feel about that at this moment, now. . . ;)) and maybe that's all you need to know about that for now.  Stay the course, the rest will take care of itself, it's a process thing.  I bet you'll do a better job than I have, getting through it, coming to the other side of it.  For sure.  You have life of strengths and challenges and experiences  far; and you are getting earlier intervention-- and that's a really good thing.  Stay safe (no matter how frustrating or intense it gets or feels); Use your supports.  Have "Safety/Crisis Plan" and use that-- just have to survive these parts, rougher waters.

#1 Rule: "Don't let the bastards grind you down"-- U2  ;)  ;D  . . . and "no quarter to stand". . . remember there always is that quarter (when you feel backed into a corner), and that small space can become big, and you're a force to be reckoned with-- good outcomes with staying the course of doing what needs to be done to be well again and stay safe.
Cheers,
k
 

kstart

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Not sure how this will go over either, or if I'm out of line with this, but just exploring other ways of looking at things, using some imagination. . .

but I wonder about OSI-recovery, if it can be conceptualized as "warrior training: part deux".  Survived and coped with the chit from theatre, operations and then, being back, there's an opportunity for another level of training, healing, recovering that helps bring it all together.  There are some neat texts, ancient texts re: the warrior that are interesting for inspiration, contextualizing things. . .

I've used some 'metaphors', but I'm also told that 'healing metaphors' can have a practical and useful purpose along the way.  But really it comes down to whatever 'floats your boat', and what keeps you afloat safely is what matters.  You tend to find it when you need it and it can come from both familiar and surprising sources even. . . that's IME.  Hanging around the periphery here, I've found many sources of inspiration, strength (and even during or while, or whatever, being a pain in the butt-- it's all been good medicine from where I've stood, swallowing my pride at times, seeming like a shameless annoyance, the whole gambit, 9 yards ;-) )
 

Gunner98

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Excellent book if you get a chance borrow or buy it:

http://www.amazon.ca/Once-Warrior-Always-Warrior-Navigating-Home-Including/dp/0762754427
 

Pieman

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Excellent book if you get a chance borrow or buy it:

Looks like a good read. Is the book geared towards those who have returned and are still serving? Or is it for everyone?

Also, anyone here who is having problems with an OSI read this and find it helpful? Would like to hear your opinion.

 

Gunner98

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It is an excellent book, currently recommended by OSI medical practitioners in Canada and US.  I have read it, it is written in plain (non-clinical) soldier-friendly language and brings a different perspective on 'warrior thinking'.  Col Hoge is a retired US Psychiatrist who uses real situations to demonstrate the issues and assist people in overcoming them.  It is focused at soldiers coming back from deployment (but is applicable to soldiers regardless of their deployment experience) as well as their families and friends to understand the issues. 
 

wildman0101

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T/W
As simisn turner asked,,
are you Reg/Res/or a VAC client.
Believe it or not this is pertinent.
KSTART. You can voice an
opinion but
untillt you've walked  the walk or talked
the talk, your advise toTW is useless. Copy.
Stay in your lane Lass,
Cheer's and best Regard's. Scoty  B OUT
 
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