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Really quick question on PRK.

aigooomona

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I know there are million of posts about PRK or laser eye surgery, but all I need is the answer for a specific question. I talked to my recruiter but he refuses to give a precise answer (which is understandable) before conducting the medical exam. I see people say that if you chose LASIK, they will put your application on hold for 6 months. And yes, I am certain that I need eye surgery for my high prescription, and I want to enter as armored soldier.

My question: How long would the application be put on hold for PRK ? I know they would obviously ask to get a waiver signed by the doctor, but what is the minimum recovery time they ask (not the recovery time for PRK, I can search that)

Thank you, I don't need a specific answer, just someone who has done a PRK for the army application.
 

aigooomona

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I read the thread. I could not find my answer :( I just want to know if I have only myopia and the PRK surgery goes well, are they still going to hold my application like Lasik for 6 months after the surgery
 

DAA

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aigooomona said:
I know there are million of posts about PRK or laser eye surgery, but all I need is the answer for a specific question. I talked to my recruiter but he refuses to give a precise answer (which is understandable) before conducting the medical exam. I see people say that if you chose LASIK, they will put your application on hold for 6 months. And yes, I am certain that I need eye surgery for my high prescription, and I want to enter as armored soldier.

My question: How long would the application be put on hold for PRK ? I know they would obviously ask to get a waiver signed by the doctor, but what is the minimum recovery time they ask (not the recovery time for PRK, I can search that)

Thank you, I don't need a specific answer, just someone who has done a PRK for the army application.

Not sure why this is such a huge issue.  It's not hard to give you a copy of the "Guidelines" with regards to Laser Eye Surgery and how it applies to CAF applicants.  It would have been so simple, for your Recruiter, to refer you to the Medical Staff for a 1-2 minute chat and been given this info.

:dunno:
 

Pusser

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I had PRK done while serving.  I was placed on a medical restriction (T-Cat: effectively meaning I could not be deployed) for six months.  After six months, I had to go in for a check-up.  The doctor said he could see nothing to indicate that I had ever had surgery at all (i.e. no scarring or other indication).  The T-Cat was lifted and I have carried on with my career with the added ability to actually read my alarm clock without needing to first find my glasses (went from V4 (almost V5) to V1 - now, 15 years later, back to V2 :().

In short, I suspect the general medical opinion is that six months is the amount of time they feel is necessary to determine whether any kind of laser eye surgery will have an adverse effect on one's ability to serve.
 

Mediman14

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I had worked in the medical section in Recruiting within the past 10 years. I don't know if policies has changed all that much. But yes, any applicant getting lazer eye corrective surgery usually do have to wait several months, then has to be cleared by the physician, then the RMO will make his decision.
 

DAA

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Non-Aircrew

Preferred Procedures
9. Photo Refractive Keratectomy (PRK) and Laser Epithelial Keratomileusis (LASEK) are the two laser procedures currently recommended by the CF. Laser-Assisted in-Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) even though not encouraged, is acceptable.
Restricted Procedures
10. Due to the lack of predictability or lack of structural maintenance of the eye, RK (Radial Keratotomy) INTACS (Stromal Rings), Phakic Implants, Phakic IOL and Orthokeratology are not permitted. These procedures are considered incompatible with the safe performance of military duties.
Enrolment Candidates
11. Candidates for enrolment who have received laser eye surgery must report so during the enrolment medical process. A final report from the Ophthalmic Surgeon or consultant optometrist must be made available as evidence of the candidates fitness and that no further follow-up is required. Restrictions for the procedures detailed above also apply to candidates for enrolment. Candidates treated for Ortho-K will be disqualified until the practice has been stopped for a period of six months. A letter from the caregiver is also required to confirm this period.

Aircrew

Recommended Procedures
6. Acceptable refractive surgery procedures for serving CF pilots are as follows: Wavefront Guided (WFG) Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK), WFG surface ablation procedures such as LASEK and Epi-LASIK and WFG Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK). The best options for creating the flap should be discussed with the surgeon, including current generation mechanical keratome, the use of a femtosecond laser and the use of IntraLase SBK (Sub-Bowman's Keratomileusis) that is a hybrid procedure that employs an infrared beam to make an ultra-thin flap.
7. Conventional (non WFG) refractive surgery and LASIK using a mechanical keratome are not recommended for pilots but may be acceptable for non-pilot aircrew.
Non-Approved Procedures
8. Radial Keratotomy (RK) is not approved for entry to, or transfer within, the CF.
9. Corneal reshaping with contact lenses is not a form of refractive surgery, however it has been addressed in this directive as it may be offered as an alternative to refractive surgery. Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) and corneal refractive therapy (CRT) are procedures using special rigid gas permeable contact lenses to reshape the cornea for the temporary reduction of myopia. Ortho-K and CRT are not acceptable procedures for any CF Aircrew

The CF tends to lean towards the side of caution on this topic, so they will most likely use the higher standard (ie; Aircrew Standards) when assessing you.  Follow-up varies depending on the reason for treatment but expect to wait for at least "6-months" afterwards and before being processed further.

*****  -  I'm not a member of the CF Health Services, so the information above is to be considered as a "GUIDELINE ONLY" and something that can/should be discussed with the Medical Staff at your local Recruiting Detachment.  If someone from CFHS sees any "bad" information in this post, please PM me and I will remove/clean it up for accuracy.
 

CombatDoc

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If you're looking at enrolling as an armoured crewman, then the non-aircrew standards listed above would apply during enrollment. As per all recruiting questions, though, only the RMO can determine your medical fitness from a recruiting standpoint.
 

DAA

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ArmyDoc said:
If you're looking at enrolling as an armoured crewman, then the non-aircrew standards listed above would apply during enrollment. As per all recruiting questions, though, only the RMO can determine your medical fitness from a recruiting standpoint.

:goodpost:        :goodpost:


Thanks ArmyDoc!
 
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