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The "Nursing Officer" Merged Thread

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AbdullahD

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Sorry I can't help you there. I couldn't find anything.

Maybe call a recruiter and ask? I would guess they will have or be able to get the answer for you.

Abdullah
 

RubberTree

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BaneVincent...I'll try and answer some of your questions. The best thing you can do is ask a recruiter some questions...at least to find out how the nursing numbers stand and if they are looking for direct entry nurses right now.

BaneVincent said:
Hello all,

I'm glad I found this thread, I've read most of what's posted here and they are quite insightful. Thank you to those who keep this thread active.

I am looking in signing up for NO-full-time.

Here's my background:
I graduated BScN 2008, had experience with emerge(E)/critcal care(CC) for about 2 years before going into mental health(MH) for the rest of my practice up to recent because that's what I wanted at the time. Going on 2 years now I've been working as a MH consultant for Northern parts of Canada that serves marginalized communities so in a way I've experienced and seen some things and this has sparked my interest to shift into the E/CC world again but the civy side (being in the hospital all the time) no longer interest me, I know as NO you still have clinicals but in the forces you get deployed from time to time also it's just different than being civ nurse.

Also, I'm 32 fairly gym fit. cardio could use some work but that can be taken cared of. any other 30+ that signed up made it out of BMOQ? do peoeple fail BMOQ? or will I even get a response from recruiters esp that I'm older?
I'm very flexible with moving wherever province they'll send me so CPT is not a problem.
I plan to join as an NO and knowing that my E/CC is rusty is it recommended to take some courses before signing up or is training provided?
I know they have MH staff/ dept as well but that's not why I want to sign up, with my background, training, and various certs in MH and crisis managment any chance that they'll stick me in MH? if so can I leave? I know sounds extreme but I want to be in E/CC.

edit: ok say I was in MH, what are my chances to be deployed?

any information at all can help.

Thank you!

BV

1) 32...especially a relatively fit 32 is certainly not too old to either be considered as a candidate or pass the training. If you can go into it with a determined mind set and a moderately fit body you should be fine.

2) Most NOs join as Generalists and then specialize later. You could try and submit a prior learning assessment to become a Mental Health Nurse right away but you don't have to if you don't want to go into that field. Personally I think you have been out of ER/CC too long to just hop back into that specialty (especially if you have been away from the bedside for awhile) but it is certainly something you could apply for and become trained in after you get in. All that to say I don't think specific ER/ICU courses would really help your chances of getting in unless you have the bedside hours to back it up. Courses like ACLS/PALS/TNCC/BLS etc probably wouldn't hurt though.

3) If you sell yourself as a MH nurse, you may get steered towards that field. If you make it clear that it is a skill that you have but not one that interests you anymore, no one will force you into it.

4) Deployments come and go. There are quite a few nurses deployed right now but next year and 3 years from now that may be different. It is really hard to nail down those types of possibilities. If you really want to deploy and are thinking of making the CAF into a career I would say your chances of going somewhere eventually are probably pretty good. Higher if you are a Critical Care nurse.

Hope that helps a bit.
RT
 

BaneVincent

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Thank you both for your help.
I did schedule to take the emerge certs like ACLS/PALS/TNCC/BLS/ and ECG interpreting I know that's integral and have a hospital lined up to take me as casual, would be great for experience while waiting.
Will look further into it and call a recruiter for further down the line. will update as necessary. Cheers!
 

cuspborn

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Greetings.

I'm not exactly sure how to post questions on here or if this is the right thread to be posting my question in.
I understand that Nursing is a "Purple Trade" and can therefore serve in all of the elements (sea, land, air). My question is: what are the differences (advantages/disadvantages) for being a Nursing Officer (NO) for the Army vs. Navy vs. Air Force. I'm primarily interested in learning what NO's do when they are not actively deployed in theater.

I'm a relatively new BScN graduate with approximately 1000 hours nursing experience working as an RN in in-patient physical rehab. I understand I may be asked to work at a civilian hospital after Basic Military Officer Qualification to gain acute care experience. This is primarily why I want to join CAF - to gain work experience. I would like to eventually work in critical care nursing after the military.
 

RubberTree

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Cuspborn,
Being a purple trade means that despite wearing the uniform of one element, you function in all three. There is absolutely no difference between an army nurse, air force nurse or navy nurse beyond the colour and style of their uniforms. All three will receive the same training and work in the same places. Even very element specific positions like Aeromedical Evacuation (AE) have nurses from the army and navy as well as the air force.
When working on an army base vs an air force base or navy base you will obviously see patients from different trades (sailors vs airmen vs infanteers etc) but beyond that the job is the same.
What nurses do when they are not deployed depends on where they are. Some nurses will work in primary care seeing patients on "sick parade" while others will work in the same building but will handle the administrative side of things including leadership positions or operations and training positions. Other nurses will work in "High Readiness Detachments" and will spend a great deal of time working in a civilian hospital and participating in planned exercises. The idea is that these nurses will be always ready for deployment and will be called upon first when there is a need. Other nurses are more removed from the clinical side and will work in managerial roles, usually in Ottawa and steer the direction of nursing in the CAF as a whole. There are finally a few little pockets of nurses doing things like AE, living overseas in Germany or the US or working as instructors in training centers in places like Borden.
I hope this helps.
RT
 

mariomike

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cuspborn said:
I understand that Nursing is a "Purple Trade" and can therefore serve in all of the elements (sea, land, air). My question is: what are the differences (advantages/disadvantages) for being a Nursing Officer (NO) for the Army vs. Navy vs. Air Force.

To add to the above, see also,

ArmyDoc said:
Nursing Officer is a so-called "purple trade", which means that your environmental uniform has no bearing on where you may be employed. You are as likely to end up in Edmonton as Halifax.

RubberTree said:
Nursing is considered a "purple" trade meaning an army nurse can just as easily be posted to a naval base as an army one.

Nurses do not go on ships. 



 

cuspborn

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mariomike said:
Nurses do not go on ships.

My classmate is in week 5 of BMOQ. The Royal Canadian Navy offered him a position, will that mean we will most likely be posted in naval bases?
 

mariomike

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That was a quote from RubberTree,

RubberTree said:
Nurses do not go on ships.

cuspborn said:
The Royal Canadian Navy offered him a position, will that mean we will most likely be posted in naval bases?

Please see Reply #345.

Also Reply #344,

RubberTree said:
Being a purple trade means that despite wearing the uniform of one element, you function in all three. There is absolutely no difference between an army nurse, air force nurse or navy nurse beyond the colour and style of their uniforms. All three will receive the same training and work in the same places.

This discussion explains "Purple trades",

Purple Trades: Definition & Trg Discussion
https://army.ca/forums/threads/22558.175
11 pages.

Nursing is considered a "purple" trade.

 

KanD

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Could someone please share the 2020 in service selection numbers for ROTP Nursing Officers?

Any advice on the following would also be appreciated:

1. Currently serving my 5th year as a Class A Reservist;

2. Have already previously completed a Bachelors of Science and Masters of Science in another field and am looking to make a full-time career change to the CAF in a medical field, which will require me to go back to university (acceptance currently pending);

3. Is an in service ROTP application for a NO of PO the most logical route or should I: (i) stick with my current Class A trade and request education reimbursement over the next four years; or (ii) postpone my acceptance to a civilian university, release from the CAF, and attempt to reapply as a civilian ROTP applicant?
 

Blackadder1916

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KanD said:
Could someone please share the 2020 in service selection numbers for ROTP Nursing Officers?

In the absence of someone currently in the recruiting system, the only entry plans that are listed on the recruiting webpage (https://forces.ca/en/career/nursing-officer/) for Nursing Officer are:

Direct Entry Options
If you already have a university degree and licence to practise as a registered Nurse in a Canadian province or territory, the CAF may place you directly into an on-the-job training program following basic training. Basic training and military officer qualification training are required before being assigned.

Paid Education Options
Continuing Education Officer Training Plan (CEOTP) –  Nursing Officer

If you already have a Diploma in Nursing from an accredited Canadian college, a current active license to practise as a Registered Nurse from a Canadian provincial or territorial regulatory authority and have proof of good standing from that authority, the CAF may subsidize up to two years of full-time studies to complete an undergraduate nursing program. You must be able to provide proof of unconditional acceptance into as accredited Canadian nursing program.

For further information, please contact a Canadian Forces Health Services Recruiter: HealthSvcsRecruiting-RecrutementSvcsdesante@forces.gc.ca

So it would seem that the CAF is only taking already qualified and licensed nurses.  The only paid educational program is to enable diploma qualified nurses to get a degree.  So, no ROTP.
 

winds_13

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KanD said:
Could someone please share the 2020 in service selection numbers for ROTP Nursing Officers?

Any advice on the following would also be appreciated:

1. Currently serving my 5th year as a Class A Reservist;

2. Have already previously completed a Bachelors of Science and Masters of Science in another field and am looking to make a full-time career change to the CAF in a medical field, which will require me to go back to university (acceptance currently pending);

3. Is an in service ROTP application for a NO of PO the most logical route or should I: (i) stick with my current Class A trade and request education reimbursement over the next four years; or (ii) postpone my acceptance to a civilian university, release from the CAF, and attempt to reapply as a civilian ROTP applicant?

KanD,

ROTP is not an in-service selection program. However, reservists may still apply as Component Transfer ROTP applicants (CT-ROTP) and compete against regular civilian applicants. That being said, there have not been any ROTP positions for Nusing Officer in the past 2 years and I would be surprised if it is open for selection next year.

If you are looking specifically to enrol as a medical specialist, then perhaps you should consider the Medical Officer Training Program (MOTP) or the Dental Officer Training Program (DOTP). There are also programs for Subsidized Education of Entry-level Masters (SEELM) programs for Physiotherapy Officer and Social Work Officer.

Otherwise, you can apply as a Direct Entry Officer (DEO) in any officer trade that you meet the Entry Standards for. Already having a Bachelors degree, let alone a Masters, precludes you from being found suitable for RMC or Seneca College (CEOTP Pilot program).

In no situation would I recommend a reservist to release from the CAF to apply for ROTP as a civilian. There is zero reason to do so. If anything, CT-ROTP applicants may still be given the option to attend Civilian University (for specific trades) and receive much higher pay if selected (their pay does not drop from their current level for their rank). As well, these applications are easier/faster for the recruiting centre to process as they do not require additional medical (unless going aircrew trades) or security screening.

Also keep in mind that there is a $8000 career maximum to education reimbursement for Reserve members (see below link), in case you have made claims in the past.

Hope that helps.

https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/services/benefits-military/education-training/reimbursements-allowances/education.html#reserve
 

da1root

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winds_13 said:
ROTP is not an in-service selection program. However, reservists may still apply as Component Transfer ROTP applicants (CT-ROTP) and compete against regular civilian applicants. That being said, there have not been any ROTP positions for Nusing Officer in the past 2 years and I would be surprised if it is open for selection next year.

Just want to fix some information.

2 years ago there was Nursing Officer ROTP enrollments.

Last year there was intake numbers however because Nursing Officer, Pharmacy Officer and a select few others are Civilian University only and the funding was removed no outside CAF selections were made; however
there were some ROTP-CT's as the policy didn't extend to Reserve Members.

At current anyone asking about ROTP Nursing for this FY is being asked to contact the Health Services Recruiters again in July as the Health Services Branch has asked for ROTP Nursing to be funded again through DPGR; there is a potential intake for this year; however the final decision is likely to come in over the summer.
 

RubberTree

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Yes, there will be a very limited number of ROTP spots for nursing officers this year with more to follow in the next year as well.
RT
 

Fiji_Boy_

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RubberTree said:
Yes, there will be a very limited number of ROTP spots for nursing officers this year with more to follow in the next year as well.
RT

Thank you very much for your reply. I really appreciate it.
 

Fiji_Boy_

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RubberTree said:
Yes, there will be a very limited number of ROTP spots for nursing officers this year with more to follow in the next year as well.
RT

Hello. I spoke to a recruiter in Ottawa today and the sergeant told me there is 0 spot for ROTP Nursing next year (2021-2022). I am a bit sad to hear this..
 

RubberTree

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I'll reach out to the person I spoke with and confirm. Don't be discouraged, this kind of news can take time to travel.
RT
 

RubberTree

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Fiji_boy_,
This year started with 7 spots for ROTP nursing. It has since been increased by around 20.
Whether these spots have all been filled or not I cannot tell you.
 

Fiji_Boy_

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Hi RubberTree,

I directly talked to a health services recruiter in Borden today, and told was there were spots for this year's entry (2020) but they do not yet know whether there will be ROTP Nursing positions next year. The recruiter told me they will have that information earliest next January or February and told me to contact later next year.

Thank you for your guidance.
 

da1root

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Fiji_Boy_ said:
Hello. I spoke to a recruiter in Ottawa today and the sergeant told me there is 0 spot for ROTP Nursing next year (2021-2022). I am a bit sad to hear this..

Hi Fiji Boy - please reach out to me directly as I can tell you 100% that we have spots for ROTP Nursing for this year.  I'd also like to know which Sgt you were talking too so that I can ensure the proper education is reaching the recruiters.  Please send me a PM and I'll forward you my email and phone number.

Edit Note: Please check your spam email - I emailed you on 23 October 2020 and 10 November 2020 with information on ROTP Nursing - the email came from HealthSvcsRecruiting-RecrutementSvcsdesante@forces.gc.ca
 
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