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The Sleep Superthread- Apnea/ Disorders/ etc.

Adam

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Two years ago I was on a Base defence course, it consited of Army, Air and Navy.  The Troops were formed into sections for the final EX.  My section commander was Navy but some of the others were led by Army types. 
  Our section worked 1 in 2 shifts: 24:00 - 07:00 work, 07:00 - 12:00 sleep, 12:00 - 17:00 work, 17:00 - 24:00 sleep,  The day shift worked the opposite timings.  The schedule worked great we made it through the EX well rested and the timings kept us on track with meals!
  The Sections led by Army types worked 3 hours on 3 hours off, at the end of the Ex they were walking zombies. But now i realize that the Army types believe in walking zombie training.  :boring:
                                                    :boring:  :boring:
 

orange.paint

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Depends on the work really.

If its non strenious with good weather the navy guy may be right.
However if its hot weather,boring task i.e sitting on sentry or directing traffic shifts must be changed up to prevent sleeping and keeping them sharper.

heres one of the charts pretty neat I thought.

Rules of Thumb __
Mainly Physical work:
3 hours of uninterrupted
sleep per 24 hour period
for up to 9-14 days

Mainly Mental work:
4 hours of uninterrupted
sleep per 24 hour period
for up to 4-6 days

 

GO!!!

Fallen Comrade
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Adam said:
   The Sections led by Army types worked 3 hours on 3 hours off, at the end of the Ex they were walking zombies. But now i realize that the Army types believe in walking zombie training.  :boring:
                                                    :boring:   :boring:

It come as a shock to you, being a "medical type" but comfort and rest are not principles of war, nor are they helpful in simulating conditions in which the training you have learned will be used.

Training in which food, water and rest are at a premium is more accurate in terms of what you will encounter when deployed to our active theatres, and those who have had nothing but "good go" exercises will find themselves sorely tested when they are forced to endure these conditions.

I find that hard training helps to seperate those who really want to be there from those who simply show up. To better illustrate my point, several of the "medical types" on our last exercise became casualties themselves, requiring "army types" to carry their kit, weapons and eventually assist with their medevac because they had not sufficiently prepared themselves, and succumbed to exhaustion, dehydration or injury (blisters). Notably, none of the "army types" who had participated in plenty of "walking zombie" training had similar problems. Correlation? Who knows?

<puts head down and staggers back to work for more zombie trg>
 

orange.paint

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I really cannot see how someone becomes a "zombie sleeping 4x 3hr blocks during the day.That's a cakewalk,not a bagdrive.Personally I drive the body harder than that during a normal work night.Its 11:42 I just got back from a run a while back and I haven't slept all day! And I have to wake up in 6 hours.....the horror!

If these guys were actual zombies they were either really weak,or their superiors we not enforcing them getting sleep.After seeing troops so exhausted as you say I'm sure any leader who start telling them not to take a 3 hour smoke break and rack out.


Pity you guys with 80,000 angry Serbs instead of 300 fat Canadians trying to get to work.
 

Deck

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Just a few tricks I have learned along my way. I am currently on leave from BMQ for the Xmas season. Prior to enrolling and being accepted for a MSEop position I was a long haul owner operator (truck driver 18 wheeler ). Running east to west coast trips frequently. Often days would extend from one into another for a couple weeks on end and almost entirely consisted of random mundane mind numbing tasks. IE, sailing across the Nebraska flats or climbing the mountains of Colorado at 15 mph for hours on end. None the less the need to retain mental functionality is obvious. Coffee for the most part I found to be more of an accelerant  to wake me up instead of actually keeping me from dozing off. I ran on a ration of no more than 3 cups of coffee ever in a day. So for the most part I would have to say the most useful tool you have is mind over matter and natural stimulation. For example I would always keep one of the those thick elastic hair bands on my wrist, start to get a little fuzzy eyed, give your self a quick snap of the elastic on your bare arm or flesh of choice. Always carry one of those cheap grip strengtheners with you. Just a little bit of constant activity can buy your self a few hours. Keep your temperature as cool as you can. Now I am sure not every person will have an environment where the following is practical. Often when I would feel the fog setting in I would try to externalize emotion with the most vocal battle cry I could muster. I am by no means a psychologist but something about forcing your self to get angry and then yelling at the top of your lungs sparks a natural reaction of adrenaline and other fuzzy stuff that can keep you going for a bit. Last but not least is not what you do while your awake but what you do to ensure that every last second counts when you actually do receive that power nap.  Common sense things must become a priority, make sure you have eaten no sooner than 3 or 4 hours prior to shut eye. Make sure you're warm and dry. Make sure your not in the middle of a caffeine or sugar rush. Talk your self into a quick sleep state by using relaxation techniques or self hypnosis. Make stretching a part of your daily routine. Find your self getting bored, spend a 10-20min block of time properly stretching each major muscle group this can add up to an hour of physical activity that your body will actually learn to feel as though it needs to have in order to feel at ease.

Happy Holidays Folks 2008/09
Sharpe 462
R0203E
 

joonrooj

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Any form of hard candy, sucking on it gives you something to do, the sugar doesn't make you crash (well as bad as caffeine), and its good for morale.
And yes, chew is great too, one of the few times I will chew is to stay awake.
 

GUNS

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Switch a meal break for a catnap. you will be surprised what a 15 min. catnap will do.  :warstory:

If your eye lids feel heavy, get in a uncomfortable position, if you are in a static location. When you can not endure the uncomfortable position any longer change to a more comfortable one. You get that refreshed feeling every time. :warstory:

 

kkwd

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Why stand when you can sit?
Why sit when you can lie?
Why lie when you can sleep?
The first is a quote from Winston Churchill, the other 2 are unknown to me.
So take your rest whenever you can and don't waste time doing things that are unnecessary.
 

Greymatters

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Activity and keeping your face and eyes cool work very well, been doing it for years.

In addition I would suggest that during times when you are enduring lack of sleep, avoid eating any large meals, eat the same amount in small portions over time instead if you can.

 

geo

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Learnt a long, long time ago that, you grab a few ZZZs each & every possible moment you can get one.

Certainly - when I took my Junior leaders, 6A & 6Bs, all the instructors made a point of pushing us to an extreme - just to see how well we could cope with sleep deprivation & stress.  Those that couldn't just didn't complete the course.

Nowadays, I can drop into "power nap" mode at the slightest provocation - simply amaazes my wife.

Coffee / Cafeine & Tobaco chews.... just be prepared to pay the price for having abused your body
 

Rifleman62

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From an aide memoire:

SLEEP DEPRIVATION Sleep is a physiological need like food and water. No level of leadership, experience, or skill level can overcome sleep loss. You cannot train for fatigue or sleep loss.

FATIGUE


FATIGUE   IS   THE   STATE   OF   FEELING   TIRED/SLEEPY   THAT   RESULTS   FROM PROLONGED  MENTAL/PHYSICAL  WORK,  EXTENDED  PERIODS  OF  ANXIETY,  AND EXPOSURE  TO  HARSH  ENVIRONMENTS  OR  LOSS  OF  SLEEP.  FATIGUE  IMPAIRS ALERTNESS  AND  PERFORMANCE  OFTEN  WITHOUT  A  SOLDIER’S  AWARENESS. IT   PRODUCES   PERFORMANCE   PROBLEMS   SIMILAR   TO   THOSE   CAUSED   BY ALCOHOL. BORING/MONOTONOUS TASKS INCREASE THE FEELING OF FATIGUE.


SYMPTOMS
1.    Difficulty  in  attention  and  concentration. Poor, careless   performance, greater tolerance for error. Irritability, decreased motivation and conservation of effort.  Eyes go in and out of focus.
NOTE: Require brief backs when giving fatigued soldiers instructions or orders.


FIRST AID
1.    Alternating  soldiers  between  heavy and light  duty  tasks,  including  a  moderate work pace on heavy tasks.
2.    Enforce   a   good   rest   plan.   Provide breaks, naps or time off when task complete.
3.    Adjust the complexity of tasks and make changes   in   assignments   to   prevent boredom.
4.    Provide   high   protein   nutritional   food before/after and/or during task. Consume caffeine drinks

SLEEP LOSS

SLEEP-DEPRIVED  SOLDIERS  WILL  DISPLAY  MOST  OF  THE  FATIGUE  SYMPTOMS. SOLDIERS  MAY  TOLERATE  REDUCED  HOURS  OF  SLEEP  OF  4  HOURS  (7  DAYS). LONG TERM OPS (14 DAYS) REQUIRE AN ABSOLUTE MINIMUM OF 5 HOURS.

SYMPTOMS

1.    Increased  fatigue,  irritability  and  unreasonableness.  Mental  and  physical  performance deteriorates. Impaired speech and accuracy of skilled tasks. Confusion and   disorientation.   Occasional   visual and sense of touch hallucinations.
NOTE:  Require  brief  backs  when  giving sleep-deprived   soldiers   instructions   or orders.  Provide  information  and  instructions in written form.

FIRST AID

1.    Frequently  alternate  soldiers  on  tasks that  require  a  high  degree  of  vigilance. Postpone  difficult/complex  tasks  during early A.M.
2.    Enforce   a   good   rest   plan,   schedule forced rest (naps).
3.    Allow  soldiers  to  pace  themselves  so they  can  maintain  accuracy  by  slowing speed.  Closely  supervise  and  provide immediate feedback to increase motivation.
4.    Ensure   soldiers   get   the   nutrition   and fluids their bodies require.

NAPS

1.       Naps can sustain performance during continuous work periods and should be encouraged if the situation permits. The best time to nap is before a period of sleep loss to prevent subsequent performance impairment.
2.       Naps should be as long as possible. A single two-hour nap is very beneficial. Short naps of 30 - 45 minutes are better than none.
3.       Timing: 1400 - 1600 or 0300 - 0600 is best. Allow 15 - 20 minutes to become fully alert before starting/resuming task.
4.       Conditions: relatively quiet, cool, dark, comfortable place, if possible. Use ear plugs.
5.       Leaders must ascertain the reasons why soldiers are sleeping during normal duty hours before awaking them. Forced rest (naps) may have been ordered. Awaking the soldier unnecessarily will defeat the purpose of the forced rest and possibly lower morale.
6.       Never Sleep: in running vehicle or tent without a stove watch; close to tracks/roads; in front of/behind/on top of/under a vehicle; outside of designated sleep areas; in a location not known to the leader.

EFFECTS OF SLEEP LOSS

Reference: B-GL-332-001/FP-001

(see picture attached)








 
R

R. Jorgensen

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I am on a "Special Projects" program along with the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) at my High School and I basically go to school twice a week for 6 hours (two alternating classes - English/Science and Math/Social Studies; Tuesday will be Eng/Sci and Thurs will be Math/SS) and then I work the rest of the week. Well, since I took on a welder-machinist position I've been working some odd hours and had trouble falling asleep and remaining asleep and my supervisor (former MCpl of 12 RBC) recommended a naturally occuring sleep aid: Melatonin.

You can buy bottles of 90 tablets in the vitamin aisle at the local grocery store/drugstore-pharmacy and it says right on the bottle "recommended for shift work". It basically gets you to sleep faster and allows you to remain asleep throughout the duration (I am still able to wake up on time whether it's someone yelling at me before or after my alarm goes off or when the alarm sounds).

It helps eliminate sleep deprivation by making you sleep, however it doesn't keep you awake.
 

geo

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In the US of A....

The use of melatonin as a drug can entrain (synchronize) the circadian clock to environmental cycles and can have beneficial effects for treatment of certain forms of insomnia. Its therapeutic potential may be limited by its short biological half-life, poor bioavailability, and the fact that it has numerous non-specific actions. 

In recent studies though, prolonged release melatonin has shown good results in treating insomnia in older adults.

However, here in CANADA...

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=M1ARTM0010549
At times of high anxiety, Marie Pember takes a pill to help her get to sleep. A few years ago, it was a pill prescribed by her doctor - an addictive drug that made the 57-year-old sales consultant feel groggy and sluggish in the morning. Pember, who lives in the Vancouver suburb of Delta, stopped using it. She now takes melatonin, a naturally occurring hormone that is also available in pill form. Pember says that melatonin, which is non-addictive, gives her "a great night's sleep" and leaves her feeling "terrific" when she wakes up. But because of a recent federal ban on the substance, Pember, like thousands of other Canadians, is forced to buy her supply in the United States, where melatonin is freely available over the counter in health-food stores and pharmacies. "Everything I've read about melatonin says it is safe, and I think Canadians should have the freedom to choose," Pember insists. "This ban is stupid. All it means is that I drive 20 minutes to buy it across the border in Washington."
 
R

R. Jorgensen

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geo said:
In the US of A....

The use of melatonin as a drug can entrain (synchronize) the circadian clock to environmental cycles and can have beneficial effects for treatment of certain forms of insomnia. Its therapeutic potential may be limited by its short biological half-life, poor bioavailability, and the fact that it has numerous non-specific actions. 

In recent studies though, prolonged release melatonin has shown good results in treating insomnia in older adults.

However, here in CANADA...

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=M1ARTM0010549

I think that information is outdated because I just bought a bottle at Safeway in Cochrane, AB on Saturday. But on the other hand, it is amazing.
 

geo

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After looking up some more... yep - seems that Melatonin is now available in Canada.  Will have to look up this product for those days when a little bit of help is needed
 

ghyslyn

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If you can mix the Melatonin with Somatotropin, I don't know of the legality of this I only know it on a biological scale as I've been using this trick for ages by mixing a glass of milk with a banana(mixing somatotropin with melatonin) an hour prior to sleeping, works miracles on periods of my life where I had difficulty falling asleep.
 

Greymatters

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Rifleman62 said:
SYMPTOMS
1.    Difficulty  in  attention  and  concentration. Poor, careless   performance, greater tolerance for error. Irritability, decreased motivation and conservation of effort.  Eyes go in and out of focus. 

A good start!

I would add:

1.b. Soldiers may express denial of symptoms.
2.  Effects are magnified by mental states such as loss of willpower, depressed attitudes, or lack of morale/poor espirit de corps.
 

geo

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WRT melatonin.....

Drink warm Milk - something you probably instinctively knew (without the chemical analysis) :cheers:
 

AGuyWithAGun

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I find keeping the body/mind moving key during times of sleep dep, especially during those 0100-0400 hrs when the body naturally expects to be racked out. When in a leadership position I found this easy as there is always something to do. However, when rifleman #1 and the task is to staticly watch 10' to 2' I found sunflower seeds always worked for me. Just stick a big wad in one cheek and slowly work on wittling it down.
 

oldpond

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I have a problem falling asleep when I drive in the highway.  I find that nibbling on something prevents me from falling asleep.  Jelly beans or sunflower seeds work well.  You can't fall asleep while eating.
 
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